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    • Food and Mental Wellbeing: The Gut-Brain ConnectionChoosing healthy whole foods and nutrients can improve mental health, but a holistic approach including mindfulness of the gut-brain connection is crucial for overall wellbeing. Dr. Uma Naidoo's book explores the link between specific foods and mental health issues.

      Dr. Uma Naidoo, a pioneer in nutritional psychiatry, explains that food plays a vital role in improving mental wellbeing. She emphasizes the importance of healthy whole foods and nutrients and believes that one can control emotions through food choices that they make daily. It is, however, not the only lever to pull for mental health, as a holistic and integrated approach works best for mental wellbeing. Dr. Uma Naidoo's book, 'This Is Your Brain on Food: An Indispensable Guide to the Surprising Foods that Fight Depression Anxiety, PTSD, OCD, ADHD and More,' explores how specific foods can have specific effects on mental health issues. Overall, we need to be mindful of the gut-brain connection or the food mood connection, and make conscious food choices to improve our mental health.

    • The Power of Food as Medicine for Mental WellbeingNutritional psychiatry highlights the importance of clean eating, nutrient-rich foods, and mindfulness practices for improved mood and mental health. With fewer side effects than medications, adopting a healthier lifestyle can be a complementary treatment.

      The food we eat directly affects our mental wellbeing. Nutritional psychiatry is a developing field with immense scientific knowledge about the gut microbiome and its impact on our mental health. Dr. Uma Naidoo emphasizes the power of food as medicine, and how clean eating can nourish both our mind and body. While medications have detrimental side effects, healthy food and lifestyle changes can significantly improve our mood and mental health. However, nutritional psychiatry is not a diagnostic approach but rather a complementary treatment. Therefore, one should incorporate healthier food patterns, eat nutrient-rich foods, and practice mindfulness to reduce stress for better mental wellbeing.

    • Using Nutrition as a Tool for Treating Mental HealthNutrition, exercise, and meditation can be used alongside medication to treat mental health. Patients should not rely solely on medication and should communicate with doctors about alternative solutions. Doctors can ask lifestyle questions to find an integrated solution.

      Nutrition can be a powerful tool to stave off medication with side effects in treating mental health issues. However, there is a need for more tools in the toolbox when diagnosing mental health issues as patients do not fall into checklists. Patients should not also solely rely on medication as the solution. It is important to consider lifestyle changes such as nutrition, exercise, and meditation alongside medication. Despite the short visit time with doctors, patients should open up a line of questioning and not expect medication as the only solution. Doctors can dig into a patient's lifestyle information through surveys or short questions before the visit to help find a more integrated solution.

    • The Pressure to Prescribe Medication in Psychiatry and the Importance of Exploring Other Therapy OptionsPatients should have open discussions with their psychiatrists about alternative therapy options for mental health, including exercise and building a sense of community. Nutrition and the gut-brain connection also offer insights into mental well-being.

      Medical insurance often pressures psychiatrists to prescribe medications rather than explore other therapy options for patients. Patients should advocate for themselves and discuss other tools beyond medication with their doctors, such as exercise and building a sense of community. Nutritional psychiatry and the gut-brain connection is one mechanism showing how what we eat can impact our brain. The gut and brain rise from the same cells and are connected by the vagus nerve, allowing for chemical communication. Psychiatrists should explore therapy options beyond just medication and patients should ask what else can be done for their mental well-being.

    • Gut Health and its Impact on Mental HealthA healthy gut-microbiome can positively impact mental health by producing short-chain fatty acids, while unhealthy food causing inflammation can lead to depression and anxiety. Being strategic about what we eat is crucial for a healthy gut-brain connection.

      What we eat is important for our gut microbiome, which affects our overall health and mental health. Healthy foods interact positively with gut microbes to produce short-chain fatty acids while unhealthy foods cause inflammation, leading to mental health conditions like depression and anxiety. The gut and brain are connected in an ecosystem, and inflammation in the gut can lead to the brain. The gut-brain connection is also known as the food mood connection, and what we eat sends signals to the brain, affecting our mood. Therefore, it is crucial to be strategic about what we eat to send the right signals to our brain to be in a reasonably happy place.

    • How Diet Affects Mood: Tips for Better Mental HealthEating high fiber plant-based foods, fermented foods, minerals like magnesium and potassium, tryptophan, spices like turmeric, and calming teas can help lower anxiety levels. Tailoring your diet to your specific needs, in addition to breathing and meditation, is essential for proper mental health.

      What you eat can have an impact on your mood. Research has shown that stressful emotions affect gut microbes, which in turn affect how they interact with our food. High fiber plant-based foods like beans, berries, nuts and seeds, legumes and healthy whole grains are good for anxiety. Fermented foods, minerals like magnesium and potassium, tryptophan, spices like turmeric and calming teas can also help lower anxiety levels. Eating a healthier whole food diet is helpful in fending off symptoms, but tailoring your diet to your specific needs is important for proper mental health. An integrated approach that includes proper diet, breathing, and meditation is essential.

    • The Benefits and Considerations of Incorporating Beans, Chocolate, and Intuitive Eating into Your DietIncorporating nutrient-rich beans and reducing lectin levels with SOLEC can improve gut health. Including a variety of foods and avoiding orthorexia is key to a nutritional psychiatry eating plan, and practicing mindful intuitive eating can help with portion control.

      Incorporating beans into your diet can be a great choice as they are rich in nutrients and fiber. SOLEC method, soaking beans overnight to reduce lectin level, can reduce discomfort from canned organic beans. A nutritional psychiatry eating plan is about including more foods and varying options, rather than excluding them. Dark natural chocolate can be helpful for mood and anxiety, but people with sensitive microbiomes may want to replace or avoid it. Orthorexia, fixation on certain foods, can be counterproductive, and it's better to focus on tweaking lifestyle changes and eating habits rather than going to extremes. Intuitive eating allows people to eat what they want, when they want, but with the important caveat of being mindful of portions and food choices.

    • The Importance of Intuitive Eating and Understanding Nutrition.Listen to your body, avoid demonizing foods, and find a healthy balance by making conscious decisions about what you eat and how it affects your physical and mental health.

      Intuitive eating and a gentle understanding of nutrition are key. It's important to listen to your body about when you're hungry and what foods make you feel good or bad. Avoid demonizing foods and instead find your own level of comfort with what you want to eat, while being mindful of the effects certain ingredients may have on your physical or mental health. Finding balance and knowing what works for you is important, and it's okay to make conscious decisions to have certain foods sometimes, while also being aware of how they may make you feel.

    • Balancing Healthy Eating and Indulgence, Mood-Boosting Foods, and Considering SupplementsFinding a healthy balance between indulgent foods and healthy eating is important. Incorporating mood-boosting foods like omega-3s, plant-based sources, fermented foods, and spices can help. Consider vitamins and supplements after consulting with a clinician. A food-first approach is preferred.

      The 80/20 rule suggests eating healthy for around 80% of the time and indulging occasionally. It's important to find what works for you instead of feeling like you have to give things up. To improve mood, omega-3 fatty acids, plant-based sources like chia and flax seeds, fermented foods, probiotics, prebiotics, low folate foods like leafy greens, and spices like saffron can help. Vitamins and supplements can also be beneficial, but it's important to discuss them with a clinician and find well-made supplements since they're not as regulated as prescription medications. A food first approach is preferred, but supplements may be necessary based on clinical assessment or symptoms noticed by a doctor.

    • Expert Advice on Supplements, Vitamins, and SleepAlways seek advice from a doctor before taking supplements and test your vitamin and mineral levels. Spend time outdoors for natural Vitamin D, but practice sun safety. Certain foods can aid in sleep regulation, but sleep hygiene is critical. Consider intuitive eating for melatonin supplements.

      Consulting with a doctor before taking supplements is crucial as they can advise on the quality of the supplement. It's always a good idea to test your vitamin or mineral levels before taking any supplement. Spending 10 minutes outdoors can provide 80% of your Vitamin D requirement, but putting on sunscreen is important as well. Foods like eggs, fish, oats, walnuts, sunflower seeds, tart cherries, and cherry juice can help regulate sleep disorders, along with chamomile tea, soybeans, quinoa, and tryptophan in Turkey or chickpeas. However, sleep hygiene is equally important, like avoiding bright lights, shutting off electronic devices, and following a healthy sleep schedule. Intuitive eating can help in regulating melatonin supplements based on how one feels.

    • Nutritional Psychiatry for Cognitive HealthEat whole foods, limit processed and sugary foods, and follow anti-inflammatory diets such as the mind diet to fend off cognitive issues and improve overall health. Consult a doctor before taking high doses of Melatonin.

      Melatonin can be a short-term sleep supplement, but taking high doses without consulting a doctor can be problematic and lead to negative impacts. Nutritional psychiatry can offer guidelines to help improve cognitive function, such as the mind diet that emphasizes leafy green vegetables, nuts, olive oil, whole grains, and beans while limiting coffee intake. Anti-inflammatory Foods can also help fend off neuroinflammation, which can exacerbate cognitive disorders. While specific conditions have their recommended Foods, a broad commonality is to eat whole Foods and limit highly processed and sugary Foods. Lifestyle changes and mindful eating can also stave off cognitive issues and improve overall health.

    • How Slow Changes in Your Diet Can Benefit Your Mental HealthBy following a nutritional psychiatry plan, including the Mediterranean diet and avoiding certain foods, such as glutamate-rich foods and A1 milk protein, individuals can improve symptoms of mental health conditions. Simple changes, such as eating breakfast and consuming natural sugars, can also help.

      Making slow and steady changes in your diet can significantly improve your mental health and reduce symptoms of various conditions such as PTSD, ADHD, and OCD. Nutritional psychiatry plans that focus on eating patterns such as the Mediterranean diet, along with foods rich in polyphenols, omega-3 fatty acids, vitamin E, and vitamin C are helpful. It's important to avoid glutamate-rich foods like Parmesan cheese, miso, and oyster sauce, as they can worsen symptoms of trauma and OCD. A1 milk protein found in certain types of dairy can also potentially worsen symptoms of ADHD. Eating breakfast and consuming natural sugars instead of processed sugars are also beneficial for mental health.

    • The Six Pillars of Nutritional Psychiatry for improved Mental HealthBy following the six pillars of nutritional psychiatry, including whole foods, leafy greens, body intelligence, balance, and avoiding anxiety-triggering foods, individuals can positively impact their mental health. Including glycine and Sistine-rich foods can be helpful, but it's important to tailor dietary choices based on symptoms.

      The six pillars of nutritional psychiatry include being whole and eating whole, eating the rainbow, incorporating leafy greens, tapping into your body intelligence, maintaining consistent balance, and avoiding anxiety-triggering foods like refined sugars, processed foods, industrialized seed oils, and trans fats. These pillars can guide individuals in making dietary choices that can positively impact their mental health. It's important to include glycine-rich foods like meat, fish, legumes, spinach, and cauliflower and Sistine-rich foods like cold grains, eggs, broccoli, red pepper, and onion. Dr. Uma Naidoo emphasizes the importance of using the guide to determine the foods to include and avoid based on one's symptoms rather than being fixated on it.

    • Dr. Uma Naidoo promotes knowledge on improving gut health through online training and social mediaClinicians can incorporate gut health principles into their practice to improve patient care. Sensible food choices are crucial in improving overall health, and educating people on this relationship can help them develop healthier eating habits.

      Dr. Uma Naidoo sees a growing interest among clinicians to learn techniques to work with patients on improving gut health. She has developed an online training program at Mass General to help clinicians incorporate these principles into their practice. By growing the number of practitioners and clinicians in this field, more people will have access to care. As a nascent field, Dr. Naidoo acknowledges that not many psychiatrists practice this way. To further educate people, she uses social media platforms and has upcoming book releases on the relationship between diet and mental health. There is a lot of emotional attachment to food, likely due to its primitive nature. Sensibility and guidance around healthy food choices is key to improving overall health.

    • Changing the Perception of Diets and Precision Medicine for Mental Health through Food.Negative cultural messages around food and a restrictive perception of diets have led to eating disorders. Precision medicine can provide personalization and better solutions for mental health through food. Ongoing research on the gut microbiome can help us understand food better.

      The negative cultural messages around food and body image have led to the prevalence of eating disorders, even among men who often disguise it as biohacking. Dr. Naidoo emphasizes the need to change our perception of diets as a restrictive entity and focus on overall guidelines that can make us feel more free. She believes in precision and personalized medicine which is backed by science and would ultimately lead to better solutions for mental health through food. While the field is still new, ongoing research on the gut microbiome can help us understand food better. People should check out her book, website, social media, and training course for a better understanding of this emerging field.

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    • And she describes a tool for understanding your emotions called, “The 90-Second Rule”



    Full Shownotes: https://www.tenpercent.com/podcast-episode/jill-bolte-taylor-552

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    Does Mindfulness Actually Make You Happier (or Better) at Work? | Prof. Lindsey Cameron

    Does Mindfulness Actually Make You Happier (or Better) at Work? | Prof. Lindsey Cameron

    People have mixed feelings about the popularization of mindfulness and meditation over the last 10 or 15 years with some referring to it as “McMindfulness.”


    The critiques can be worthy and the mainstreaming of meditation and mindfulness also have helped millions of people upgrade their lives. One of the many areas where mindfulness and meditation have made inroads of late is the workplace. 


    All sorts of employers are offering their teams access to meditation via apps or in-person training. But does this stuff actually work? Does it really make you happier at work or better at your job? And what techniques produce which benefits?


    Professor Lindsey Cameron is an Assistant Professor at the University of Pennsylvania's Wharton School of Management. Her research focuses on mindfulness as well as the future of work. She has a 20 year practice, having studied and taught primarily in the Vipassana and non-dual traditions. In her prior career, Professor Cameron spent over a decade in the US intelligence and in diplomatic communities serving the Middle East, Africa, and Europe.


    In this episode we talk about:

    • What companies mean when they talk about mindfulness at work
    • What the mindfulness at work research says and how Prof. Cameron parses the results
    • The ways mindfulness helps us counteract our inherent biases and stereotypes
    • Which specific practices are most beneficial, depending on the situation 
    • Prof. Cameron’s tips for integrating small mindfulness moments into our everyday routines 
    • Where she stands on the whole “McMindfulness” debate
    • Prof. Cameron’s research into the gig economy — and how, paradoxically, an Uber worker can feel a sense of autonomy and freedom even though the work is ultimately being dictated by an algorithm



    Full Shownotes: https://www.tenpercent.com/podcast-episode/lindsey-cameron-577

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    Meditation Party: The “Sh*t Is Fertilizer” Edition | Sebene Selassie & Jeff Warren

    Meditation Party: The “Sh*t Is Fertilizer” Edition | Sebene Selassie & Jeff Warren

    Today’s episode is the first in an experimental new series called Meditation Party. 


    Dan takes listener calls with fellow meditators Sebene Selassie and Jeff Warren and get candid about their practices and dealing with life


    Sebene Selassie is based in Brooklyn and describes herself as a “writer, teacher, and immigrant-weirdo.” She teaches meditation on the Ten Percent Happier app and is the author of a great book called, You Belong. Jeff Warren is based in Toronto and is also a writer and meditation teacher who co-wrote the book, Meditation for Fidgety Skeptics with Dan Harris. Jeff also hosts the Consciousness Explorers podcast.


    Call (508) 656-0540 to have your question answered during the Meditation Party!



    Full Shownotes: https://www.tenpercent.com/podcast-episode/sebene-selassie-jef-warren-553

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    Jerks at Work | Amy Gallo

    Jerks at Work | Amy Gallo

    This is the third installment in our Work Life series. In other episodes, we cover topics like imposter syndrome, whether mindfulness really works at work, and whether you should actually bring your whole self to the office.


    Today's episode is one that many of us struggle with: interpersonal conflict at work. Our guest is a true ninja on this topic. Amy Gallo is a workplace expert who writes and speaks about interpersonal dynamics, difficult conversations, feedback, gender, and effective communication.


    Gallo is a contributing editor at Harvard Business Review and the author of a new book, Getting Along, How to Work with Anyone, Even Difficult People. She's also written the The Harvard Business Review Guide to Dealing With Conflict, and she cohosts the Women at Work podcast.

      


    In this episode we talk about:


    • Why quality interactions at work are so important for our professional success and personal mental health
    • Why Gallo believes one size doesn’t fit all when it comes to dealing with difficult people in the workplace 
    • Why avoidance isn’t usually an option 
    • What the research tells us about work friendships
    • Why we have a tendency to dehumanize people who have more power than us
    • Why passive aggressive people can be the most difficult to deal with
    • The provocative question of whether we are part of the problem when work conflict crops up
    • And, a taxonomy of the eight different flavors of difficult coworkers, including the pessimist, the victim, the know-it-all, and the insecure boss — with tactics for managing each. 




    Full Shownotes: https://www.tenpercent.com/podcast-episode/amy-gallo-576

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    How the Science of Attachment Can Help You Make and Keep Friends | Dr. Marisa G. Franco

    How the Science of Attachment Can Help You Make and Keep Friends | Dr. Marisa G. Franco

    Did you know that having friends can make you less depressed? One survey found that the average American had not made a new friend in the last five years but 45% of people said they would go out of their way to make a new friend if they only knew how.   


    Our guest today, Dr. Marisa G. Franco, has written a bestselling book about how understanding your own psychological makeup and attachment style can help you make and keep friends. Franco is a psychologist and a professor at the University of Maryland. Her book is called Platonic: How the Science of Attachment Can Help You Make–and Keep–Friends.


    This is episode three of a four part series in which we are doing some counter programming against the typical Valentine's Day fair. 


    In this episode we talk about:

    • Why friendship is undervalued in our society (while romantic love is overvalued) and why this is damaging on both a societal and individual level
    • The impact of technology on our relationships as explained by something called “displacement theory”
    • The biological necessity of social connection and the devastating physiological and psychological impacts of loneliness 
    • Attachment style and its relationship to our friendships
    • What you can do to make friends, including being open or vulnerable (without oversharing)
    • How to reframe social rejection
    • The importance of generosity
    • How to handle conflict with your friends
    • The difference between flaccid safety and dynamic safety in your friendships
    • When to walk away from a relationship 
    • How to make friends across racial, gender, and socioeconomic lines
    • How to deal with social anxiety
    • And how our evolutionarily wired negativity bias can impact the process of making friends



    Full Shownotes: https://www.tenpercent.com/podcast-episode/marisa-g-franco-561

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