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    #366 How Your Brain Creates Your Reality: A Neuroscientist’s Take On Consciousness, Near Death Experiences & What it Really Means to be You with Professor Anil Seth

    Mindfulness meditation creates a gap between our thoughts and experiences, allowing us to recognize their grip on us. It changes the brain and helps us gain perspective and distance from our thoughts.

    enMay 30, 2023

    About this Episode

    What does consciousness mean to you? It’s something that’s fundamental to who we are as humans. And yet it’s a concept that many of us would struggle to define – scientists and philosophers included. But today’s guest is someone who has spent many years and countless hours studying it, and is keen to share what he has learned.

     

    Anil Seth is Professor of Cognitive and Computational Science at the University of Sussex and Co-director of the Sackler Centre for Consciousness Science. He is a globally respected neuroscientist and author of the Sunday Times bestseller Being You: A New Science Of Consciousness. And he is someone who excels at making complex ideas simple as evidenced by the fact that his TED talk has been viewed over 12 million times to date.

     

    After 20 years researching the brain, Anil’s ideas on perception, reality, and what it means to be you, will have you reconsidering everything you’ve taken for granted about your experience of the world. And if that sounds scary, it really isn’t. You don’t need any prior knowledge of neuroscience, philosophy, or spirituality to enjoy this episode – but it will leave you feeling enlightened in all three areas.

     

    During this conversation we consider death, ritual and the cultural idea of reincarnation. We talk about Near Death Experiences and what we can potentially learn from them and we dive into what consciousness and the self really mean. Anil also sets out his theory that our brains don’t read the world, they write them – all of life is a controlled hallucination.

     

    The way we encounter reality, he asserts, is a construction. Our thoughts and perceptions are merely interpretations of external and biological cues. We’re all hallucinating, all the time. It’s just that when we agree on those hallucinations, we call it reality.

     

    Anil’s work is fascinating and I’m convinced it could pave the way for a humanity that’s more connected, considerate, and humble. This is a conversation that I think will have you reflecting and thinking deeply about the world and your place within it. I hope you enjoy listening.


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    DISCLAIMER: The content in the podcast and on this webpage is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Always seek the advice of your doctor or qualified healthcare provider. Never disregard professional medical advice or delay in seeking it because of something you have heard on the podcast or on my website.



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    🔑 Key Takeaways

    • Our consciousness constructs our reality, and death is the end of a process. General anesthesia offers a sense of oblivion, which can reduce fear and anxiety about death. Believing in nothingness can be comforting.
    • Consciousness is a natural process that disintegrates the brain into little functional islands, resulting in the loss of self-awareness and becoming an object. Though anesthetics work reliably, we still have a lot to learn about consciousness.
    • Anesthesiologists strive to balance anesthesia to prevent risks and patients may recall experiences due to slight threshold slips. Near death experiences may hold significance, but interpretations are not always true, as rituals don't always align with scientific understanding.
    • Incorporating rituals and beliefs, even without scientific backing, can provide comfort and aid in managing the emotional impact of death. It's important to have open conversations and acknowledge diverse cultural practices surrounding death.
    • Our consciousness is dependent on the brain and body, but the self is not a unitary thing and can exist even after death. The death of a loved one can be a powerful experience, and the way they die and the moments leading up to it can be significant.
    • Defining death varies over time and can be subjective. Cherish the final moments with loved ones as understanding consciousness leaving the body is difficult.
    • Our brain creates a subjective experience of reality rather than objectively perceiving it. Our perception is a result of the brain's predictive abilities, leading to a constructed reality that may differ from objective reality.
    • Our perception of color and reality is constructed by the brain, influenced by perspective and state of mind. Recognizing this controlled hallucination helps us appreciate diverse viewpoints and explanations for the same thing.
    • Our interpretations of subjective experiences can differ due to individual differences in color perception and context. Being mindful of this can help us understand ourselves better and make better decisions.
    • Recognizing our individuality in perception can bridge gaps, increase empathy, and lead to a more unified future. It's crucial to acknowledge and embrace diverse viewpoints to create a more compassionate world.
    • Recognizing that our beliefs and perceptions are shaped by biases and interpretive processes can lead to greater empathy and humility. Mindfulness and meditation can help us develop the psychological distance needed to observe multiple interpretations. By being aware that our perceptions are constructions, we can better contextualize them and communicate more effectively with others.
    • Mindfulness meditation creates a gap between our thoughts and experiences, allowing us to recognize their grip on us. It changes the brain and helps us gain perspective and distance from our thoughts.
    • Meditation can break negative thinking patterns and improve mental health by changing our experience of reality. By being aware of our mind's power to shape our experiences, we can gain fresh perspectives and improve our mental well-being.
    • Our brains assign meaning to sensory signals received and create perspectives based on past experiences, enabling humans to recognize and harness this process for cognitive advantage.
    • Attention control and altering brain templates can change sensory perceptions. We create our own experiences of the world and need to interpret perceptual events accordingly, as they do not fully represent the external world.
    • Our brains have evolved to perceive the world in ways that help us survive, but recognizing our individual perspective can improve communication and relationships with others. Being mindful of past experiences can also improve present interactions.
    • By recognizing and challenging the brain's perception of the world and our bodies, we can improve our interpersonal relationships and develop a stronger sense of self-awareness. Training our interception can aid in this process.
    • Disconnecting from external distractions and practicing meditation can improve our mental health by dissolving negativity. Recognize the uniqueness of the brain and the integral role of the body in our emotions.
    • By paying attention to our bodily sensations and interpreting them consciously, we can control our responses and behavior, instead of letting external factors or automatic reactions dictate our actions.
    • Our emotions control our body and the brain assigns meaning. Psychedelic-assisted psychotherapy, with proper set, setting, and ritual, can help explore perception and settle into more helpful ways of perceiving the self, body, and world.
    • Consciousness encompasses our subjective experience of the world, and the Dream machine offers a unique intervention for exploring it. Consciousness is as difficult to define as life, but it shapes our reality and understanding of ourselves.
    • Our consciousness is not isolated to our individual brain but also depends on the interaction between our brain, body, world, society, culture, and the universe, highlighting the importance of external factors in shaping our experiences of the world.

    📝 Podcast Summary

    Understanding Consciousness, Death, and Oblivion.

    Consciousness is the process that allows us to experience the world around us and makes us more than just biological beings. It is a controlled hallucination, as our brains use external and biological cues to construct reality. Death is the end of a process, not an essence, and our loved one's personality does not disappear forever. General anesthesia can help us face death as it offers a type of oblivion that there is nothing to be frightened of. Believing that there is no pain, no suffering, and no anything after death can be reassuring.

    The Mysterious Process of Consciousness

    The end of consciousness is a natural process and similar to anesthesia, where the brain stops talking to each other in the ways they normally do in waking consciousness, and the brain disintegrates into little functional islands. Any kind of experience is consciousness, and when that's selectively turned off, then you just become an object. We know that anesthetics work, they're very reliable and if used properly, they're very safe, but the deep reasons how and why things work are often still a little bit mysterious. Although there is a way to understand how the various experiences like near-death experiences might come about, we still don't fully understand consciousness.

    Balancing Anesthesia and Near Death Experiences: Exploring Rituals and Interpretations

    Anesthesiologists have a challenging job of maintaining the balance of anesthesia to prevent dangerous situations for patients. Patients may remember things under anesthesia due to the threshold slipping slightly. Near death experiences can be meaningful for the individuals, but the interpretations of these experiences may not be true. What we experience is the brain's interpretation of what's going on. Rituals can be helpful in providing a frame and a sense of doing the right thing during difficult times but do not necessarily come from a scientific worldview.

    The Power of Rituals and Beliefs in Coping with Death

    Rituals can be helpful even without a scientific basis. People have managed to deal with death for thousands of years without modern neuroscience. Sometimes beliefs may conflict with science, but it's worth doing the work to align the different ways of understanding what's happening in life. Understanding more about how things are will in the long run always enable us to live a better life and manage better, but it depends on who you are and how you choose to live it. Death is a big thing and different cultures approach it differently. We should talk more about death and remove the taboo around it.

    The distributed self and the illusion of death

    The self is not a unitary thing, but is distributed across many, and even after death, parts of the self that were distributed, still exist. Consciousness is dependent on the brain and body, as changes in the brain are instantly reflected in changes in experience, and it is hard to reconcile that consciousness persists for an individual when the brain stops entirely, which is medically when we say death happens. Death may be an illusion, but the flow of consciousness is what makes us human. The death of a loved one can be a powerful experience, and the way they die and the moments leading up to it can be significant.

    The Complexities of Defining Death and Consciousness

    Understanding the moment of consciousness leaving someone's body is complex and subjective. It is difficult to know when exactly it happens or when death occurs, as definitions have changed over the years from when breathing stops to when the heart stops to now when the brain stops. Near-death experiences could be a result of a burst of activity in the brain as death approaches. While death may be an illusion, it depends on how we define it. The final moments before death hold significant meaning, and it is essential to cherish these moments with loved ones as they gradually slip away.

    Our Perception of Reality is a Controlled Hallucination

    The concept of self and free will being an illusion assumes a definable ground truth that we are not perceiving accurately. The exact moment consciousness starts is not fully known, but we do know that consciousness develops in stages, and the world of a newborn might be this undifferentiated massive sensory impressions. Our experience is the brain's prediction of what's out there in the world, and the brain writes our reality instead of reading it out. The brain's prediction of what's out there is what we experience; hence our experience is a controlled hallucination. Colors are not present objectively in the world; they are a construct of the brain's wavelength interpretation.

    The Deconstructed Perception of Color and Reality

    Color isn't there in the world, it's a construction of the brain. The brain conjures millions of different colors out of a thin slice of reality, making our perception of color simultaneously less and more than what's really there. Perspective and state of mind shape how we perceive the world, causing us to perceive the same thing differently over time. Our reality is a controlled hallucination, where the mind is not making up reality but constructing it. Understanding this controlled hallucination can help us interact with the world and realize that there can be different viewpoints and explanations for the same thing.

    The Subjectivity of Interpretation and Its Impact on Perception.

    Our brain creates subjective experiences, and interpretation plays a critical role in it. Context affects interpretation, as seen with the color constancy concept. It explains why some people see the dress as white and gold while others see it as blue and black. The brain controls for ambient light, indicating that individual differences in color perception can happen. Thus, recognizing the subjectivity in interpretations of experiences can help us understand ourselves better. We need to be mindful of how our interpretations can influence our perspectives in different contexts and ultimately impact our decision-making process.

    Understanding Perception Diversity for a Compassionate World

    Our perception of the world is unique to us, and the differences in perception can lead to confusion and misunderstandings. The dress episode showed that recognizing our own point of view is important to understand our differences. Anil Seth's perception census project aims to understand the hidden landscape of inner diversity in how we perceive things, which is important for social and scientific reasons. Knowing this can lead to a more compassionate world with less tribalism, more forgiveness, more understanding, and more empathy. We need to recognize that not everyone sees things the way we do, which is the hope towards a better world.

    Cultivating Humility and Empathy Through Understanding Our Perceptions

    Understanding that our perceptions and beliefs are based on interpretations and perspectives can help cultivate humility and empathy. Biases and interpretive processes shape our perceptions, and it's important to recognize that we have them. Mindfulness and meditation can be helpful in developing psychological distance and observing multiple interpretations. Cultivating humility about our beliefs and perceptions can lead to better communication and empathy, and recognizing that our perceptions are constructions but not totally arbitrary helps us put a higher level of context on top of them.

    Mindfulness Meditation: Changing the Way We See Ourselves and Our Thoughts.

    Meditation helps in opening a gap between how things seem and how they are, allowing thoughts, experiences, emotions, moods to just pass by without buying into them. Our thoughts, emotions, and perceptions are creations of the brain, and meditation trains our attention to step outside of these habits just for a little while. This way, we can recognize the grip they have on us in our everyday life and make changes. Meditation is not about having an empty mind but about changing the relationship we have with ourselves and our thoughts. Studies show that meditation changes the brain, and these differences accumulate over time. Practicing mindfulness can help us gain multiple perspectives and a little bit of distance from our thoughts and experiences.

    The Power of Meditation in Shaping our Experiences

    Meditation can be helpful in breaking the cycle of negative thinking and interpreting events in a dysfunctional way, which can contribute to mental health issues like depression. It doesn't solve everything, but changing your experience through meditation can be valuable. The brain is a predictive organ that generates our reality internally through electrical and chemical reactions. We actively create our experience of the world, making us all artists in a sense. Getting fresh perspectives can help break the cycle of hearing or seeing things in a particular way, and editing or typos can be improved. Our brains and minds have the power to shape our experiences, which underlines the importance of being aware of this power.

    The Brain's Active Generation of Experience

    Our brains actively generate our experience of the world by interpreting and assigning meaning to the sensory signals they receive. This is not limited to humans, but is a deeply evolutionary conserved principle shared by many organisms. Our ability to recognize and harness this process may be what makes us human. An example of this is sine wave speech, where the brain's interpretation can change what we consciously experience of a sound. Our brains create a perspective and expectation about what a sound means based on previous experiences. This can also be seen in the way our brains are primed to notice certain things, like red cars after buying one.

    How our Brain Shapes Perceptual Experience

    Our brain selects tiny bits of information from the environment and changes our perceptual experience based on selective attention. Attention control can change the way our brain makes predictions and alters our sensory experience. Anil Seth's 'sine wave speech' example showed that altering the brain's template can change the sensory perceptions without depending on selective attention. Experiments like Perception Sensor study at Anil Seth's website showcase how individuals have distinctive perceptual experiences using interactive visual illusions. These experiments help individuals recognize that they're creating their own experiences of the world. Our brain determines what information it thinks we need consciously to interact with the world. However, we need to recognize that our perceptual experiences are not fully representative of the external world and interpret perceptual events accordingly.

    Understanding the Brain's Role in Perception and Communication

    Our brain creates our own unique subjective world, but it isn't arbitrary. Evolution has designed our brains to see the world in ways useful for survival, behavior, and daily activities. Recognizing our individual perspective allows us to better communicate with others who also have their own creative acts of perception. We should be aware that our preconceptions from past interactions may color our present experience and try to interact with people as if it is the first time we've met them for a liberating and enjoyable experience. Our brain has evolved for safety, not harmony, so we should be mindful of this in relationships.

    Understanding the Brain's Impact on Relationships and Self-Awareness.

    The brain's evolutionary wiring, which has not adapted to the modern world, can affect relationships. The sense of self is not fixed; it is constantly changing and is a creative act. The brain generates perceptions of both the world and our body and its internal workings. The perception of internal bodily sensations, known as interception, can be trained. Along with the five senses, interception is an essential sense that helps the brain understand the world around us. By recognizing the habits and perceptions created by the brain, we can challenge them and adapt to the modern world, leading to harmonious relationships and better self-awareness.

    The Importance of Paying Attention to Our Internal State

    In our modern culture, there is a lack of attention given to paying attention to ourselves and our internal state. While technology and external distractions have made it easier to disconnect from our bodies and emotions, it is essential to learn to pay attention to what's happening inside us. Meditation and paying attention to the breath can help us achieve this. By paying attention to our bodies and emotions, we can dissolve the negativity of our emotions and improve our mental health. While there is a popular belief that the brain is like a computer and a thinking machine, it is essential to realize that the brain is a unique entity, and the body plays an integral part in our emotional responses.

    Mindfulness through Minimalism

    Walking in minimalist shoes promotes mindfulness as it allows you to feel the interaction of your feet with the ground. An experiment from the 1970s showed that the interpretation of our emotions depends on the scenario and context, rather than only on our feelings. Men who walked on a rickety bridge called an attractive woman more often, thinking that their physiological arousal was due to sexual attraction rather than fear. This study reveals that the meaning we give to our bodily sensations can shape our emotions and behavior. We can use mindfulness to pay attention to our bodily reactions and choose how to interpret them, rather than letting external factors or automatic reactions dictate our responses.

    The Power of Psychedelic-Assisted Psychotherapy in Exploring Perception.

    Our body picks up signals and our brain puts meaning to it. Our emotions control our body, and our brain interprets the meaning of that change. Psychedelics may reveal how indirect and constructed our perceptions can be, but they are not a magic bullet. Psychedelic-assisted psychotherapy shows promise to explore ways to perceive the self, body, and the world for resettle in different, more helpful ways. Set, setting, and ritual attached to it are necessary for psychedelics to do its work. Ritual provides the context in which we experience events like death happening to somebody else.

    Understanding the Definition and Exciting Aspects of Consciousness

    Consciousness is what defines our human experience. It's not just the biological functioning but also the subjective experience of the world from our senses. Though it's difficult to define consciousness, different disciplines converge in this topic, making it exciting to study and write about. The ritual and structure around experiences can give the brain existing predictions and interpretations to understand the world and the self in daily life. An interesting intervention is the Dream machine, which uses fast flickering light on closed eyes to provide people with unique visual experiences and potential benefits without the reliance on psychedelics. The definition of consciousness is like defining life, it's many things that share the feeling of something.

    Consciousness as a Product of Interaction.

    Consciousness is the medium through which we experience everything. It's out there because we experience something external to ourselves. The mechanism of consciousness is in our brain, but the contents, which are important to each of us, are a result of the interactions between the brain, the body, the world, society culture, and the universe. The world itself, emotions, color, beauty--these are not purely within the brain. We need the body, the world, and other people to get our brain in particular states, enabling us to experience. Therefore, consciousness doesn't only exist within us, but it also exists outside of us, in the world around us.

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    #452 The Science of Rituals & How They Can Transform Our Health, Happiness and Relationships with Professor Michael Norton

    Have you ever thought about the role that rituals play in our health and wellbeing? Whether it's a morning routine, a pre-game warmup, or a cultural tradition, rituals can provide us with structure, meaning, and connection.

     

    Today’s guest is Professor Michael Norton, Professor of Business Administration at Harvard Business School and author of the brand new book, The Ritual Effect: The Transformative Power of Our Everyday Actions, which delves into the science and psychology behind, why turning everyday habits into rituals can improve our work, our relationships and our lives.

     

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    Find out more about my NEW Journal here https://drchatterjee.com/journal


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    Show notes https://drchatterjee.com/452


    DISCLAIMER: The content in the podcast and on this webpage is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Always seek the advice of your doctor or qualified healthcare provider. Never disregard professional medical advice or delay in seeking it because of something you have heard on the podcast or on my website.



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    #451 BITESIZE | A 103-year-old Doctor’s #1 Secret to Health and Happiness | Dr Gladys McGarey

    #451 BITESIZE | A 103-year-old Doctor’s #1 Secret to Health and Happiness | Dr Gladys McGarey

    Today’s guest is the oldest person I’ve ever welcomed onto my show, and what a great pleasure it was for me to do so. 


    Feel Better Live More Bitesize is my weekly podcast for your mind, body, and heart. Each week I’ll be featuring inspirational stories and practical tips from some of my former guests.


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    She’s 103 years old, co-founder of the American Holistic Medical Association, and author of the fantastic book, The Well-Lived Life: A 102-year-old Doctor’s Secrets to Health and Happiness at Every Age.


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    Show notes and the full podcast are available at drchatterjee.com/394


    DISCLAIMER: The content in the podcast and on this webpage is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Always seek the advice of your doctor or qualified healthcare provider. Never disregard professional medical advice or delay in seeking it because of something you have heard on the podcast or on my website.



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    We also talk about the practical steps we can all take immediately, when it comes to choosing foods that will enhance both our short term and long-term health.

     

    We cover so many different topics today, including:  

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    Show notes https://drchatterjee.com/450

    DISCLAIMER: The content in the podcast and on this webpage is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Always seek the advice of your doctor or qualified healthcare provider. Never disregard professional medical advice or delay in seeking it because of something you have heard on the podcast or on my website.



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    #449 BITESIZE | The Simple Habit to Manage Daily Stress and Overwhelm | Tony Riddle

    #449 BITESIZE | The Simple Habit to Manage Daily Stress and Overwhelm | Tony Riddle

    Today’s guest shares a simple daily habit that can help us calm the fight-or-flight system and manage the build up of daily stress.


    Feel Better Live More Bitesize is my weekly podcast for your mind, body, and heart. Each week I’ll be featuring inspirational stories and practical tips from some of my former guests.


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    Tony believes that through connecting with nature and our natural state, we can experience greater health and happiness.


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    Support the podcast and enjoy Ad-Free episodes. Try FREE for 7 days on Apple Podcasts https://apple.co/feelbetterlivemore. For other podcast platforms go to https://fblm.supercast.com.


    Show notes and the full podcast are available at drchatterjee.com/278


    DISCLAIMER: The content in the podcast and on this webpage is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Always seek the advice of your doctor or qualified healthcare provider. Never disregard professional medical advice or delay in seeking it because of something you have heard on the podcast or on my website.



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    #448 A Proven Prescription for Health and Happiness: Why Being Able To Forgive Improves Your Physical & Mental Wellbeing with Dr Fred Luskin

    #448 A Proven Prescription for Health and Happiness: Why Being Able To Forgive Improves Your Physical & Mental Wellbeing with Dr Fred Luskin

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    Fred explains how our past hurts are stored in our bodies. People who are able to forgive are physically more relaxed. Their blood pressure and central nervous system normalise, their perception of pain lowers, their risk of depression and anxiety goes down. Crucially, their relationships are more open and trusting, so they feel less alone.


    This is such powerful knowledge to have. Most of us can probably think of an example where we’ve allowed something that’s happened in the past to sabotage our present. Not letting go of old hurts can be a way of trying to protect ourselves and control the future. But Fred points out this is a coping mechanism to stop us acknowledging when we are vulnerable. True resilience means sitting with that discomfort and learning that it will pass.


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    If that sounds easier said than done, rest assured that Fred has plenty of inspiring examples and practical suggestions to help you forgive. He is adamant that forgiveness is a choice and a skill anyone can learn. And you start by giving yourself permission to enjoy your present and future, unbound by the past.


    I really enjoyed my conversation with Fred and completely agree with him that forgiveness is an undervalued human skill. It may feel hard to access, but it is a brave choice and one that in any given situation will trigger a cascade of rewards. I hope this conversation prompts you to reconsider some of your past hurts and move forwards with self-compassion and freedom.


    Dr Chatterjee's Journal https://drchatterjee.com/journal


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    Show notes https://drchatterjee.com/448


    DISCLAIMER: The content in the podcast and on this webpage is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Always seek the advice of your doctor or qualified healthcare provider. Never disregard professional medical advice or delay in seeking it because of something you have heard on the podcast or on my website.



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    #447 BITESIZE | How To Heal Chronic Pain | Dr Howard Schubiner

    #447 BITESIZE | How To Heal Chronic Pain | Dr Howard Schubiner

    CAUTION: This podcast episode contains swearing.


    Headaches, migraine, back, neck or joint pain, irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), fibromyalgia – they’re just some of the common causes of chronic pain, which is estimated to affect between a third to half of all UK adults, or just under 28 million of us.


    Feel Better Live More Bitesize is my weekly podcast for your mind, body, and heart. Each week I’ll be featuring inspirational stories and practical tips from some of my former guests.


    Today’s clip is from episode 310 of the podcast with Director of the Mind Body Medicine Center in Michigan and author of Unlearn Your Pain, Dr Howard Schubiner.


    Emerging neuroscience tells us our brains actually create what we experience in our bodies, through a process called predictive processing. Pain doesn’t come from the body part where it’s felt, it’s created by our brain, signalling that something needs attention.


    Howard believes that in many cases of chronic pain your brain has created a neural pathway which remembers the pain and keeps you trapped in a vicious cycle. 


    In this clip he explains why it’s not ‘all in your head’, your pain is real. And there is something you can do about it. 


    Thanks to our sponsor https://www.drinkag1.com/livemore


    Support the podcast and enjoy Ad-Free episodes. Try FREE for 7 days on Apple Podcasts https://apple.co/feelbetterlivemore. For other podcast platforms go to https://fblm.supercast.com.


    Show notes and the full podcast are available at drchatterjee.com/310


    DISCLAIMER: The content in the podcast and on this webpage is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Always seek the advice of your doctor or qualified healthcare provider. Never disregard professional medical advice or delay in seeking it because of something you have heard on the podcast or on my website.



    Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.


    #446 Why Better Conversations Will Improve Your Health, Essential Skills To Enhance Your Relationships & Why Men Struggle To Open Up with Nihal Arthanayke

    #446 Why Better Conversations Will Improve Your Health, Essential Skills To Enhance Your Relationships & Why Men Struggle To Open Up with Nihal Arthanayke

    Today we’re going meta, as they say. Because this is a conversation about…conversation. More than that, it’s a deep and meaningful exchange about why effective, authentic dialogue is so important to humankind – and yet seemingly in decline. And who better to exchange words with on this topic, than my fellow ‘professional conversationalist’, Nihal Arthanayake.

     

    You may know Nihal as an acclaimed broadcaster and TV presenter. He presents a national daytime show on BBC Radio 5 Live, which has over 1.2 million regular listeners, and his unique style recently won him Interviewer of the Year at the BBC Radio and Music Awards. Nihal is a good friend, so I can testify to his ability to ‘give good chat’. But he’s also brilliant at having public conversations that are bold, thoughtful and honest. Guests from the world's biggest stars to leaders of inner-city gangs have lauded his ability to stimulate positive discussions without the need for confrontation. 

     

    In his wonderful book, Let’s Talk: How To Have Better Conversations, which has recently been released in paperback, Nihal explains that all the scientific evidence points towards us now sharing fewer conversations than we ever have done before. We may have hundreds of connections on social media, but fewer than ever in our daily lives. So, could learning the art of conversation be an antidote to loneliness?

     

    In our conversation, we discuss the importance of empathy and active listening, with your heart and mind as well as your ears and eyes. Are you listening to understand, says Nihal, or simply to respond? We talk about vulnerability in conversation, why men in particular find that difficult, and why it feels so hard for male friends to exchange words like ‘I miss you’ or even ‘I love you’.

     

    Nihal shares his personal experience and advice, such as how he’s approached conversations with friends who are going through tough times, or why he went to couples’ therapy with his wife on realising their interactions had become more transactional than conversational.

     

    He also explains the evolution and psychology of dialogue, as well as the neuroscience of what’s happening in the brain during meaningful discourse. And he shares some powerful, high-profile case studies who’ve proved that it is possible to find common ground with anyone, even those who are your sworn enemies, by finding your common humanity.

     

    I really think that the skills Nihal is encouraging us all to cultivate are essential if we are to live happy and contented lives, but also essential when it comes to our physical and mental wellbeing. This conversation was relaxed and light hearted but at the same time, powerful and provocative. As Nihal says, great conversation is the glue that binds us all together.


    Find out more about my NEW Journal here https://drchatterjee.com/journal


    Thanks to our sponsors:

    https://drinkag1.com/livemore

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    Show notes https://drchatterjee.com/446


    DISCLAIMER: The content in the podcast and on this webpage is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Always seek the advice of your doctor or qualified healthcare provider. Never disregard professional medical advice or delay in seeking it because of something you have heard on the podcast or on my website.



    Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.


    #445 BITESIZE | The Simple Habit That Can Transform Your Life | Robert Greene

    #445 BITESIZE | The Simple Habit That Can Transform Your Life | Robert Greene

    So many of us struggle to make change in our lives, and each of us has our own journey ahead of us, but, as today’s guest highlights, life is short; all of us have less time than we think to make the changes we want to make.


    Feel Better Live More Bitesize is my weekly podcast for your mind, body, and heart. Each week I’ll be featuring inspirational stories and practical tips from some of my former guests.


    Today’s clip is from episode 320 of the podcast with best-selling author and speaker, Robert Greene.


    In this clip he shares how meditation can help us gain a better understanding of who we really are, and why self awareness is key to creating lasting change in our lives.


    Thanks to our sponsor https://www.drinkag1.com/livemore


    Support the podcast and enjoy Ad-Free episodes. Try FREE for 7 days on Apple Podcasts https://apple.co/feelbetterlivemore. For other podcast platforms go to https://fblm.supercast.com.


    Show notes and the full podcast are available at drchatterjee.com/320


    DISCLAIMER: The content in the podcast and on this webpage is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Always seek the advice of your doctor or qualified healthcare provider. Never disregard professional medical advice or delay in seeking it because of something you have heard on the podcast or on my website.



    Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.


    #444 The New Science Of Memory, How to Remember What Matters & Why We're Designed To Forget with Dr Charan Ranganath

    #444 The New Science Of Memory, How to Remember What Matters & Why We're Designed To Forget with Dr Charan Ranganath

    We often think about our memories as a record of the past – but what if they’re only a selective and evolving version of it? Today’s guest is a world-leading memory expert who has a surprising message: we’re not supposed to remember everything. In fact, our brains are designed to forget. And much of what you experience today will be lost by tomorrow.

     

    Dr Charan Ranganath is Professor of Psychology and Neuroscience and Director of the Dynamic Memory Lab at the University of California at Davis.  For more than 25 years, he has studied the mechanisms in the brain that allow us to remember past events, using brain imaging techniques, computational modelling and research on patients with memory disorders. The occasion for his appearance on my podcast is the publication of his wonderful new book, Why We Remember: The Science of Memory and How it Shapes Us, which challenges, educates and enlightens, on so much of what we thought to be true about memories.

     

    In this fascinating conversation, he explains that the seemingly selective and unreliable nature of human memory doesn't reveal laziness, distraction or early dementia. Instead, it shows that our brains have not evolved to keep a comprehensive record of events. Rather than live in the past, the brain’s job is to extract the information it needs, to guide our futures.

     

    We also discuss how memories create our sense of self. We learn that our memory is an unreliable narrator but that we can use this to our advantage. By changing our perspective on traumatic experiences, we can feel differently about them in the present – a theory on which many forms of therapy are based.

     

    We also discuss our brain’s ability to change – its plasticity – and how we’re most likely to remember life’s emotional experiences as well as its new and surprising ones. Charan explains why music and smells are evocative cues, why it’s never too late to learn new skills, and why forgetting is a sign of an efficient brain - in fact, one of Charan’s key insights is that we shouldn’t strive to remember more, but to remember better

     

    This is a fascinating conversation, full of fresh ideas, wisdom and practical advice about a topic that deeply matters to all of us.


    Find out more about my NEW Journal here https://drchatterjee.com/journal


    Support the podcast and enjoy Ad-Free episodes. Try FREE for 7 days on Apple Podcasts https://apple.co/feelbetterlivemore. For other podcast platforms go to https://fblm.supercast.com.


    Thanks to our sponsors:

    https://boncharge.com/livemore

    https://drinkag1.com/livemore


    Show notes https://drchatterjee.com/444


    DISCLAIMER: The content in the podcast and on this webpage is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Always seek the advice of your doctor or qualified healthcare provider. Never disregard professional medical advice or delay in seeking it because of something you have heard on the podcast or on my website.



    Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.


    #443 BITESIZE | Avoid These 3 Foods For Better Brain Health | Max Lugavere

    #443 BITESIZE | Avoid These 3 Foods For Better Brain Health | Max Lugavere

    Today’s guest shares evidence-based principles that will help all of us protect our brain health.


    Feel Better Live More Bitesize is my weekly podcast for your mind, body, and heart. Each week I’ll be featuring inspirational stories and practical tips from some of my former guests.


    Today’s clip is from episode 330 of the podcast with science journalist and New York Times bestselling author, Max Lugavere.


    Max is on a mission to help people feel better, live longer, and maximise their brain health by optimising their diet.


    In this clip he shares the three food types that we should think about cutting out of our diet – and why. 


    Thanks to our sponsor https://www.drinkag1.com/livemore


    Support the podcast and enjoy Ad-Free episodes. Try FREE for 7 days on Apple Podcasts https://apple.co/feelbetterlivemore. For other podcast platforms go to https://fblm.supercast.com.


    Show notes and the full podcast are available at drchatterjee.com/330


    DISCLAIMER: The content in the podcast and on this webpage is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Always seek the advice of your doctor or qualified healthcare provider. Never disregard professional medical advice or delay in seeking it because of something you have heard on the podcast or on my website.



    Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.