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    • Change equals opportunityFormer CEO Jim Keyes saw change as an opportunity rather than a threat, embracing it throughout his career, from growing up facing adversity to leading companies like Blockbuster and 7-Eleven.

      Change, rather than being a negative force, can equal opportunity. This perspective was shaped by Jim Keyes, the former CEO of Blockbuster and 7-Eleven, who grew up facing adversity but went on to attend college and climb the ranks of top organizations. Despite the challenges of dealing with rapid change at 7-Eleven, Keyes embraced it and came to see it as a source of opportunity. This mindset was reflected in his phrase "change equals opportunity," which he applied to the role of a CEO. Interestingly, Blockbuster itself had an opportunity to embrace change when it partnered with Enron in the early 2000s to develop streaming video capabilities, but the story is often oversimplified as one of failure to keep up with technology. Keyes' varied career and experiences have shown him the importance of education as an enabler of opportunity, and he now advocates for micro rewards in education to help students overcome financial barriers.

    • Embracing change leads to growth and opportunityChange can be daunting but embracing it can lead to growth and improvement through continuous improvement approaches like kaizen.

      Change, no matter how daunting or unexpected, can lead to growth and opportunity. This was a valuable lesson learned by the speaker during a company crisis in the late 1980s. Instead of giving in to despair, he chose to work harder and adapt, ultimately leading to a better outcome for both the company and himself. This experience also introduced him to the Japanese business philosophy of kaizen, or continuous improvement, which he observed in action through his Japanese partners. Kaizen, based on the scientific method, involves making small, data-driven improvements to processes and products. The speaker was initially skeptical of this approach, but he soon realized its potential when he saw how effectively it was being applied by his Japanese partners. The Slurpee, a product that had been struggling in the US market, was transformed through this approach into a popular item by focusing on quality and innovation. The speaker's experience demonstrates that change, whether personal or professional, can be an opportunity for growth and improvement, and that adopting new approaches and perspectives can lead to unexpected success.

    • Continuous improvement and diversity at 7-Eleven7-Eleven's success stemmed from continuous improvement and the diverse perspectives of franchisees, leading to stronger brand strength.

      Continuous improvement and diversity were key elements to the success of 7-Eleven and played a significant role in the lessons learned during the author's tenure there. Regarding 7-Eleven, the company's approach to kaizen, or continuous improvement, involved making hypotheses, implementing actions, testing with customers, and reinventing products. This process led to stronger brand strength due to the diversity of franchisees, who embodied the American dream and brought unique cultural perspectives. Moving on to Blockbuster, it's essential to look beyond the simplistic narrative of Netflix outpacing Blockbuster due to technology. The truth is more complex, and the Blockbuster story holds valuable lessons if explored further. Contrary to popular belief, Blockbuster's downfall was not solely due to its inability to keep up with technology. The situation was far more nuanced, and understanding the intricacies of the Blockbuster story can provide valuable insights.

    • Timing and economic factors matter in technological shiftsBeing ahead of the curve in technology is crucial, but timing and economic stability are equally important for success. External factors like economic crises can impact progress even for well-positioned businesses.

      Being ahead of the curve in technology is crucial, but the timing is equally important. Blockbuster, once a leading video rental company, partnered with Enron in 2004 to explore streaming video capabilities, which was too early for the market. Netflix attempted to acquire the company in 2000, but streaming was not yet on anyone's radar. Blockbuster spun out of Viacom in 2004 with a significant debt load, which they managed until the financial crisis of 2008. They were unable to refinance the debt, leading to a restructuring and eventual sale to DISH Networks. The lesson here is that even when a business is well-positioned and knows it's early in a technological shift, external factors like economic crises can still derail progress. Cash flow management is essential, especially during times of financial instability. This historical example can serve as a lesson for businesses today, as they navigate the rapidly changing technological landscape and potential economic uncertainty.

    • Leading Through Criticism and Business ChallengesMaintain focus and confidence during criticism and challenges, recognize false information, and stay focused on the right path. Excite about AI's potential to revolutionize learning, but don't dismiss traditional education entirely.

      As a leader, it's crucial to maintain focus and confidence during times of criticism and business challenges, understanding that it's not personal but rather part of the business landscape. The speaker shared his experience of facing media scrutiny during Blockbuster's struggles, emphasizing the importance of recognizing false information and staying focused on the right path. Regarding AI and traditional education, the speaker expressed excitement about the potential of technology to revolutionize learning opportunities, especially in areas where resources have been limited historically. However, it's essential not to dismiss the value of traditional education entirely, as critical thinking and problem-solving skills remain vital in the age of AI. Ultimately, the integration of technology and education can lead to a more well-rounded and effective learning experience.

    • Revolutionizing Education with AIAI personalizes learning experiences, addresses concerns about human connection, and enhances human intelligence in education

      AI has the potential to revolutionize education by personalizing learning experiences based on individual preferences and learning styles. Instead of the traditional one-size-fits-all approach, AI can help tailor lessons to students who learn better through videos, written materials, or even live classes with top professors. However, it's important to address concerns about the lack of human connection in remote learning. The early stages of digital learning during the pandemic were challenging, but with advancements in technology, platforms will improve, and learning experiences will become more engaging. Providing incentives and creating a fun learning environment can also help keep students engaged and motivated. Ultimately, AI is not replacing human intelligence but rather enhancing it by enabling continuous improvement and personalization in education.

    • Technology's Impact on EducationTechnology offers opportunities for improved engagement and enhanced teaching in education, but personal investments and formal recommendations from The Motley Fool should be considered before making investment decisions.

      Technology is poised to revolutionize education in the same way it has transformed industries like retail and automobiles. The potential for improved engagement and enhanced teaching and learning is immense. However, it's important to remember that people on the program may have personal investments in the stocks discussed, and The Motley Fool may have formal recommendations. So, while the potential for educational transformation is exciting, it's crucial not to make investment decisions based solely on this program. Stay tuned for more insights tomorrow.

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    #176 - HigherEd & Tech in 2019 and beyond

    #176 - HigherEd & Tech in 2019 and beyond

    What's in this episode?

    Hello everyone and welcome to the fourth episode of our "The Edge" series, supported by Salesforce.Org. This series is all about new ways of doing things in Higher Education leadership and this week's episode is all about HigherEd & Tech in 2019 and beyond.

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    You can follow the conversation using #EdtechEdge and #edtechpodcast

    Happy listening and have an excellent week!

    People

    Show Notes and References  

    Check out https://theedtechpodcast.com/edtechpodcast for the full show notes 

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    We'd love to hear your thoughts. Record a quick free voicemail via speakpipe for inclusion in the next episode. Or you can post your thoughts or follow-on links via twitter @podcastedtech or via The Edtech Podcast Facebook page or Instagram.