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    Aden + Anais: Raegan Moya-Jones

    enJuly 17, 2017

    About this Episode

    Cotton muslin baby blankets are commonplace in Australia, where Raegan Moya-Jones grew up. But when she started a new life and family in NYC, she couldn't find them anywhere. She was sure Americans would love muslin blankets as much as Australians. So in 2006, she started the baby blanket company Aden + Anais, which now makes more than $100 million in annual revenue. PLUS in our postscript "How You Built That," how Sam Boyd created Guided Imports, a middleman business to help entrepreneurs find manufacturing and production solutions ... in China. See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

    🔑 Key Takeaways

    • Incorporating leisure into work trips leads to increased productivity and happiness. Personalized services and empathy can make insurance more appealing. Determination and resilience are key to entrepreneurial success.
    • Staying active and open to new opportunities can lead to discovering purpose and success in unexpected places.
    • Starting a business involves overcoming challenges, learning new skills, and forming strong partnerships to turn an idea into a successful reality
    • A working mother turned her passion for baby clothing into a successful business by focusing on product quality and securing a major order from Target.
    • Having a solid financial plan, clear communication, and a strong support system are crucial for successful business partnerships. Utilizing advanced technology can improve team efficiency and effectiveness.
    • Starting a business with a partner can lead to unexpected outcomes, including the loss of friendship and emotional toll. However, with perseverance and belief in the business, success can still be achieved.
    • Determination and a clear vision can help overcome obstacles and achieve great success, even when faced with limited resources and skepticism.
    • Regan Moya-Jones grew her business into a half-billion-dollar brand through a significant investment, allowing her to cash out while staying CEO, acknowledging the challenges of managing a large business and the benefits of experienced leadership, and remaining committed to growing the brand and addressing prediabetes.
    • Devices with real-time glucose monitoring and AI-driven apps improve health and weight management. Business tools like Grammarly prevent miscommunication and save time and resources.
    • A determined 22-year-old moved to China, started small, and grew a business from his kitchen table to employing 15 people and making nearly half a million dollars.
    • Former SportsCenter anchors launch new weekly sports podcast on Wondery discussing alternate outcomes in sports and providing unique insights

    đź“ť Podcast Summary

    Balance, personalization, and determination

    Finding balance in work and leisure can lead to increased productivity and happiness for business travelers. This was emphasized by the speaker's personal experience of incorporating leisure activities into work trips. Additionally, companies like Amica aim to make insurance more personal and human, prioritizing customer needs and empathy. Lastly, opportunities exist for individuals to make a difference and advance their careers through innovative organizations like the National Security Agency. Moreover, the story of Aiden and A showcased the determination and resilience of an entrepreneur, Regan Moyajones, who built a successful baby blanket company despite facing challenges such as the recession and a business partner breakup. Her company, now generating over $100 million in revenue, began when she and her husband moved to New York in 1997 and she couldn't find the right blanket for her newborn. Overall, the discussion highlighted the importance of balance, personalized services, and determination in various aspects of life, from business travel to entrepreneurship.

    Finding Meaning in New Experiences

    Finding meaning and productivity in new experiences can be a challenge, but it's important to stay active and engaged. Reagan, a woman who moved to New York without a job or a working visa, initially planned to fill her time with volunteering and learning Spanish. However, she soon found herself falling into a rut and becoming depressed due to the lack of structure and purpose in her daily life. Her husband encouraged her to find work, and she eventually landed a job as a sales rep for the Economist magazine. Although she was successful, she felt unfulfilled and frustrated with her lack of opportunities for growth. It wasn't until she had her first child and discovered the need for muslin blankets in the US market that she found her entrepreneurial spark. The experience of struggling to find meaning and purpose in a new environment, and eventually discovering a successful business idea, highlights the importance of staying active and open to new opportunities.

    Bringing a business idea to life: Persistence, clear vision, and the right partnerships

    Starting a business requires determination, clear vision, and the ability to find the right partners and resources. The founders of Aiden and Danae, who had the idea for a Muslim cotton blanket company in 2003, faced numerous challenges in making it a reality. With no operational or supply chain experience, they had to learn the ropes and find a way to produce the blankets that met their standards. They started by considering becoming distributors for an existing company but decided instead to create their own brand. For the design aspect, they hired freelance designers, while the manufacturing facility was discovered at a textile sourcing trade show in New York City. The first potential manufacturer was found at the last booth before leaving, and despite initial challenges with quality, they ended up working together for 10 years. This story highlights the importance of persistence, clear vision, and the right partnerships in bringing a business idea to life.

    A Working Mother's Secret Success Story: Starting Aiden and Anay

    The speaker, a working mother and former salesperson, started a successful baby clothing business called Aiden and Anay in secret while continuing to work full-time at The Economist. She focused on perfecting the fabric and ensuring it was free of harmful chemicals. The business took off when Target placed an order for all six of their initial SKUs. Initially, they funded the orders with their savings, but financial differences led to the demise of her partnership. Despite the challenges, she made it work by prioritizing her time and maintaining focus on her goals.

    Starting and growing a business requires investment and perseverance, especially during economic downturns

    Starting and growing a business involves significant investment and perseverance, even during challenging economic times. Markos and the speaker faced financial struggles during the worst recession since the Great Depression, leading them to borrow money from friends and family to keep their business afloat. However, the business partnership ultimately dissolved when one partner demanded repayment, leaving the speaker to run the company alone. This experience highlights the importance of having a solid financial plan, clear communication, and a strong support system in business partnerships. Additionally, the use of advanced technology, such as Atlassian's AI-powered software, can help teams work more efficiently and effectively, leading to greater success.

    The Emotional Toll of Buying Out a Business Partner

    Starting a business with a partner can be ideal at the beginning, but the introduction of money and tension can lead to unexpected outcomes. The speaker's experience of buying out her business partner, Claudia, was heartbreaking and resulted in the loss of their friendship. Despite the emotional toll, the speaker continued to believe in the business and grow it, ultimately reaching her goal of breaking a million dollars in revenue and leaving her previous job to focus on it full-time. This story highlights the challenges and pressures that come with business partnerships and the importance of perseverance and belief in one's venture.

    8 words: Proving self-doubters wrong leads to success

    Determination and the desire to prove self-doubters wrong can lead to great success. The speaker, who started a business selling swaddle blankets, was motivated not by money but by a need to prove to himself and others that he was capable of more than what was expected of him. He faced challenges in scaling the business due to limited resources, but once he received outside investment, he was able to hire more staff, buy more inventory, and meet the growing demand. A turning point came when celebrities began using the blankets, leading to a surge in sales and global recognition. Despite the challenges, the speaker remained focused on his goal of making other mothers aware of the product's benefits. The story serves as a reminder that with perseverance and a clear vision, one can overcome obstacles and achieve great success.

    From small business to global brand with a significant investment

    The CEO and co-founder of Aiden and A, Regan Moya-Jones, transformed her small business into a global brand worth over half a billion dollars by the age of 40. This was made possible through a significant investment from Swonder Paste Capital in 2013, which allowed her to cash out some of the company's value while retaining her position as CEO. Although she enjoys entrepreneurship and building companies, she acknowledges the challenges of managing a $100 million business and the benefits of bringing in experienced leadership. Regan expressed her desire to continue growing the brand to make her daughters proud and noted the importance of addressing prediabetes through her company's technology, Cygnos. Despite her success, she remains humble and committed to her role as a mother and CEO.

    Revolutionizing personal health and business communication

    Technology is revolutionizing personal health and business communication. For those at risk of diabetes, devices like Cygnos with continuous glucose monitoring and AI-driven apps offer real-time insights for optimal health and weight management. Meanwhile, tools like Grammarly help businesses avoid miscommunication and save time and resources by ensuring clear, concise, and on-brand writing. In China, entrepreneurs like Sam Boyd are leveraging their unique experiences and opportunities to bridge the gap between Western businesses and Chinese factories, acting as middlemen and streamlining the production process. These technological advancements and entrepreneurial mindsets are transforming industries and improving lives. To learn more about these innovations and how they can benefit you, visit Cygnos.com and Grammarly.com.

    An American's journey to start a business in China

    Starting a business from scratch can be a daunting and uncertain journey. Sam Boyd, a 22-year-old American, moved to China with the goal of becoming a middleman for English-speaking entrepreneurs looking to manufacture products. He started small, working from his kitchen table and relying on Reddit and blogs to find clients. Over time, his business, Guided Imports, grew, and he now employs 15 people in Shenzhen. Despite initial challenges and doubts, Sam's determination and hard work paid off, and his company made almost half a million dollars last year. The story of Sam's entrepreneurial journey serves as a reminder that with perseverance and a clear vision, even the most uncertain and daunting endeavors can lead to success.

    Exploring the 'what if' questions of sports with Trey Wingo and Kevin Frazier

    Trey Wingo and Kevin Frazier, two former SportsCenter anchors and current sports enthusiasts, are launching a new weekly sports podcast on Wondery called Alternate Routes. They aim to explore the "what if" questions that make being a sports fan exciting and agonizing. Listeners who share their passion for sports and enjoy dissecting every detail of games, including drop passes and play calls, will find this podcast engaging. The hosts' expertise and enthusiasm promise to provide unique insights and perspectives on the world of sports. So, mark your calendars and join Trey and Kevin as they delve into the intricacies of the sports world and explore the alternate routes that could have changed the game.

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