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    Consider This from NPR

    The hosts of NPR's All Things Considered help you make sense of a major news story and what it means for you, in 15 minutes. New episodes six days a week, Sunday through Friday.

    Support NPR and get your news sponsor-free with Consider This+. Learn more at plus.npr.org/considerthis
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    Episodes (1324)

    Russia is Top of Mind at NATO summit

    Russia is Top of Mind at NATO summit
    Four years after World War II, leaders from Europe and North America formed an alliance largely aimed at deterring Soviet expansion — the North Atlantic Treaty Organization — NATO.

    Seventy-five years later the member states of that organization have come together in Washington to celebrate NATO and plan for its future.

    As they did in 1949, the NATO allies believe Russia presents the largest security threat to their world order. The immediate threat is Russia's war with Ukraine, but the allies also worry about the future of America's leadership.

    Eight diplomats from the nations closest to Russia weigh in on the threat the country poses to them and the world order.

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    en-usJuly 10, 2024

    Gretchen Whitmer supports Biden. Some think she should run instead.

    Gretchen Whitmer supports Biden. Some think she should run instead.
    Former President Trump derided Michigan Governor Gretchen Whitmer as "the woman in Michigan," when the two publicly clashed in 2020 during the coronavirus pandemic.

    A Detroit rapper once put out a song about her called "Big Gretch" praising her handling of the pandemic.

    Whitmer's star soared during the pandemic with people being attracted to her human, pragmatic style.

    These days she's a national co-chair of the Biden-Harris campaign while simultaneously being touted a possible replacement for Biden on the ticket. Whitmer herself says that's not happening.

    As Democrats scramble to figure out a way forward this election year, Whitmer talks about her new memoir "True Gretch", and what the future may hold for both her and her party.

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    en-usJuly 09, 2024

    Support is eroding. Can President Biden hang onto the nomination?

    Support is eroding. Can President Biden hang onto the nomination?
    On June 27th, long-simmering concerns about President Biden's age – and whether he's fit to serve a second term – exploded after a disastrous debate performance.

    Biden has been trying to clean up the mess ever since. First at a fiery rally in North Carolina. And some ten days after the debate in a one-on-one interview with ABC's George Stephanopoulos.

    Neither event accomplished the goal of shoring up support for Biden, and now members of Congress are questioning whether the 46th President should remain the democratic nominee.

    Evan Osnos, New Yorker staff writer and author of a biography on Joe Biden, weighs in on the Biden campaign at a crossroads.

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    en-usJuly 08, 2024

    California is trying to lead the way on reparations but not clear on the path to take

    California is trying to lead the way on reparations but not clear on the path to take
    California recently allocated $12 million for reparations for the state's Black residents as a way to compensate them for the harm caused by the legacy of slavery and current discrimination.

    Although it's not clear what the money will be spent on, it is clear it won't be directed toward cash payments at the moment, which many in the reparations movement say is the best way to atone for the legacy and harm of slavery.

    NPR's Adrian Florido speaks with NPR race and identity correspondent Sandhya Dirks about the latest on California's attempts to lead the way on reparations.

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    en-usJuly 07, 2024

    Disabled students are struggling to get what they need at school

    Disabled students are struggling to get what they need at school
    Students with disabilities often face a tough time getting the services they need at school. When they can't get them, many families seek help from the federal government. And, right now, the Department of Education is swamped with a record number of discrimination complaints. The backlog is leaving families across the country waiting months, even years, for help.

    NPR's Jonaki Mehta visited one such family, in central Georgia

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    en-usJuly 05, 2024

    Wildfires are getting more extreme. And so is the need for more firefighters

    Wildfires are getting more extreme. And so is the need for more firefighters
    Extreme wildfires doubled worldwide over the last two decades, according to a new study of NASA satellite data.

    You'd think, if the wildfire crisis is getting worse, there'd be more and more firefighters in place to meet that demand. But at agencies like the U.S. Forest Service, adequate staffing has been a huge challenge.

    But as organizations like the Forest Service raise alarm about firefighter shortages, there's also a whole group of people who are trained to fight fires and are struggling to get jobs in the field: formerly incarcerated people.

    We hear from Royal Ramey, a formerly incarcerated firefighter who started an organization to help others build firefighting careers once they're released from prison.

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    en-usJuly 04, 2024

    Supreme Court rules Trump is immune from prosecution for certain official acts

    Supreme Court rules Trump is immune from prosecution for certain official acts
    On Monday the Supreme Court issued its most anticipated decision of the term — expanding the power of the presidency, and calling into question whether former President Trump will ever face a trial in federal court for allegedly attempting to overturn the 2020 election.

    In a 6-to-3 decision, along ideological lines, the Court ruled that presidents have absolute immunity for their core constitutional powers, and are entitled to a presumption of immunity for other official acts.

    But the Court ruled that presidents do not have immunity for unofficial acts.

    Host Ailsa Chang speaks with constitutional law expert Kim Wehle about the legal issues raised by the ruling and with NPR Senior Political editor and Correspondent Domenico Montanaro about how this decision could impact the election.

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    en-usJuly 01, 2024

    The evolution of Pride

    The evolution of Pride
    More than 50 years of Pride marches, parades, festivals, and now partnership deals with major brands has increased LGBTQ visibility and community. And as a result, it's also made Pride the target of a backlash.

    Host Scott Detrow speaks with Eric Marcus, the creator of the podcast "Making Gay History" about how Pride has evolved into what it is today.

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    en-usJune 30, 2024

    Biden tries to reassure voters after a shaky debate performance

    Biden tries to reassure voters after a shaky debate performance
    The day after a debate in which he faltered many times, President Joe Biden hit the campaign trail to try and reassure supporters that he is still up for the job and capable of beating former President Donald Trump in November.

    His performance in the CNN debate on Thursday led many Democrats to panic about his chances of winning reelection. Some commentators who have long supported Biden even called for him to step aside.

    NPR's Scott Detrow speaks with NPR Senior White House Correspondent Tamara Keith and Congressional Correspondent Deirdre Walsh about what happens next and whether Biden can quell Democrats' fears.

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    en-usJune 28, 2024

    Gun violence is getting worse. Is this the solution?

    Gun violence is getting worse. Is this the solution?
    The surgeon general's office has declared gun violence a national public health crisis.

    It's the first time the body has ever issued a public health advisory about firearms, and for Surgeon General Vivek Murthy, it's a step in reframing the conversation about death by gunfire.

    According to the CDC, more than 48,000 Americans were killed by gun violence in 2021, and over half of those deaths were by suicide.

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    en-usJune 27, 2024

    Biden's executive actions on immigration send mixed signals

    Biden's executive actions on immigration send mixed signals
    In early June, President Joe Biden severely restricted asylum requests from migrants attempting to cross the U.S.-Mexico border without authorization.

    Two weeks later, the President struck a more welcoming tone, saying he'd protect hundreds of thousands of undocumented immigrants married to U.S. citizens.

    Immigration has become a big issue, for both parties. Policy experts say Biden hopes that in a close election year, these executive actions will sway voters to his side.

    But will that strategy pay off and how will it affect migrants?

    NPR's Adrian Florido speaks with immigration correspondent Jasmine Garsd who is reporting from the San Diego border with Mexico.

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    en-usJune 23, 2024

    The U.S. election results will reverberate around the world

    The U.S. election results will reverberate around the world
    Polls – and NPR's own reporting – tell a story of many Americans fatigued by the upcoming presidential race. They're not satisfied with the choice between two men who have both already held the office of President.

    But American allies and partners are watching the race intently, including South Korea, Japan, Ukraine and Israel. The fates of those countries are closely tied to whether Donald Trump or Joe Biden ends up sitting in the White House next year.

    The NPR correspondents who cover those countries, Anthony Kuhn in South Korea, Joanna Kakissis in Ukraine, and Daniel Estrin in Israel, discuss the stakes each of those countries have in the outcome of America's presidential election.

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    en-usJune 20, 2024

    Federal student aid still up in the air for many

    Federal student aid still up in the air for many
    This year's college application process was supposed to get easier.

    That's because last year, the U.S. Department of Education announced changes to the Free Application for Federal Student Aid, or FAFSA.

    The problems with the FAFSA form began last fall.

    And with August and September around the corner, some applicants continue to experience technical issues.

    Before this year, students would already know how much aid they're getting. But in 2024, not knowing, which is the case for many, could mean they can't go to college.

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    en-usJune 19, 2024

    And the nominee is...? Who will Trump Pick for V.P.?

    And the nominee is...? Who will Trump Pick for V.P.?
    We are just weeks away from one of the biggest political events of the election campaign season: the Republican National Convention in Milwaukee.

    Former President Donald Trump is, of course, the party's presumptive nominee, but he's yet to announce his running mate.

    The list is long, but the candidates all have one thing in common — they're being considered because they could help Trump get elected in November.

    NPR's Franco Ordoñez and Jeongyoon Han break down which candidates are rising to the top and why it matters.

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    en-usJune 18, 2024

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