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    64: Tom Scott, Human Acceleration, and Failed Videos

    enJune 06, 2024

    Podcast Summary

    • Orbital mechanics and accelerationUnderstanding orbital mechanics and acceleration necessitates an open mind and willingness to learn new concepts, as it defies our everyday understanding and requires a different perspective.

      Understanding orbital mechanics is a complex task that challenges our intuition and requires a different perspective. Orbital mechanics defies our everyday understanding of coordinate systems and altitude changes. It's a topic that even experienced educators find challenging. Despite its complexity, it's important to remember that it's not impossible to grasp. In fact, many people have created educational content to help others understand it. For instance, Tom Scott, a prolific educational video maker, has explored the topic on his Lateral Podcast. The process of creating these videos has helped Tom think more laterally, and he encourages others to do the same. While discussing various topics, the conversation veered off to the topic of acceleration, specifically how fast a regular person can go from 0 to 60 miles per hour. The answer is not straightforward, as there are many factors to consider, such as the type of vehicle and the driver's ability to shift gears quickly. The standard test for performance cars is to measure their acceleration from a standing start to 60 miles per hour. Ultimately, understanding orbital mechanics and acceleration requires an open mind and a willingness to learn new concepts.

    • Velocity vs AccelerationVelocity doesn't always lead to a noticeable sensation unless significant acceleration occurs. Regular people can experience acceleration through activities like running or driving high-performance cars.

      The discussion revolved around the concepts of velocity and acceleration, specifically focusing on the difference between the two and how they apply to a regular person's experience. The speakers explored the idea that velocity, or speed, doesn't necessarily equate to a noticeable sensation unless a significant acceleration occurs. They also touched on the distinction between regular and irregular people, defining it as an average person in the street without special access or extraordinary means. The conversation led to the conclusion that running, despite not reaching 60 miles an hour, could still provide an acceleration experience, and cars, specifically high-performance ones, were also considered as possibilities. The fastest production car, the Rimac Nevera, was mentioned, capable of reaching 60 miles an hour in just 1.74 seconds, providing an average of 1.6 g's of force. Overall, the conversation highlighted the importance of understanding the relationship between velocity and acceleration and how it impacts everyday experiences.

    • Extreme accelerationHigh-performance cars reach record-breaking acceleration using fan technology, but the experience is often inaccessible to the general public due to high cost. Military personnel can experience extreme acceleration through steam catapults on aircraft carriers.

      The fastest acceleration currently known to man is achieved by some high-performance cars, with the McMurtry Spearling reaching 1.95 g's (nearly 2 times gravity) and naught to 60 in 1.4 seconds. These cars use fan technology to increase drag and improve grip, enabling quicker acceleration. Despite the incredible experience, these cars are often not accessible to the general public due to their high cost. Another way to experience extreme acceleration is through a steam catapult on an aircraft carrier, which uses compressed air and steam to launch planes, reaching impressive speeds. However, this experience is limited to military personnel. Overall, the pursuit of faster acceleration pushes technological boundaries and offers thrilling experiences, even if they are not easily accessible to everyone.

    • Extreme AccelerationRoller coasters currently provide the fastest acceleration, with some reaching over 2 g's, but the fastest is still debated due to varying conditions and unconfirmed claims

      The fastest acceleration a normal person can experience is a subject of debate, with various methods such as military jet launches, bungee jumping, and roller coasters being suggested. The Nevis catapult in New Zealand claims to launch people at 60 miles an hour, but this is yet to be confirmed. Roller coasters, specifically Stealth at Thorpe Park, are currently the fastest operating rides, with accelerations reaching over 2 g's. However, these statistics may vary depending on the weight of the train and other conditions. Tom Scott, the speaker in the discussion, has experienced faster accelerations, but not on the Nevis catapult or any of the mentioned roller coasters. The thrill of experiencing extreme acceleration can be found in various ways, but it's important to consider the risks involved.

    • Roller coaster vs. carsRoller coasters can offer intense acceleration, but the fastest ones can be uncomfortable and potentially dangerous, while cars provide a smoother ride experience.

      The experience of riding a roller coaster, such as the Stealth at Thorpe Park, can provide an intense and exhilarating sensation, similar to that of high-performance cars like Tom Scott's electric vehicle. However, the fastest roller coaster experiences, like Dododonpa in Fuji Q Highland, can reach higher acceleration levels (3.2 g's) but may come with the drawback of being uncomfortable and potentially dangerous due to the rattling and harshness of the ride. The historical limit for roller coasters has been around 3.2 g's, but the Stealth at Thorpe Park still outperforms most cars in terms of acceleration. It's important to note that safety regulations and rider compliance play a significant role in ensuring enjoyable and safe experiences.

    • Drag Racing RecordsDrag racing holds the record for the fastest acceleration a regular person can experience, with Top Fuel dragsters reaching an average of 3.5 g's and 259 mph in 3.34 seconds, but this experience is not publicly available. Other ways to experience extreme acceleration exist, but none can currently match a dragster's speed and power.

      While drag racing involves dangerous speeds and physical strain, it currently holds the record for the fastest acceleration a regular person can experience, with the Nitro X2 Top Fuel dragster reaching an average of 3.5 g's and 259 miles per hour in 3.34 seconds. However, this experience is not currently available to the public. The conversation also touched upon the various federations and regulations surrounding drag racing, as well as the potential health risks and required preparation for such high-speed experiences. Additionally, it was mentioned that there are other ways to experience extreme acceleration, such as through certain roller coasters or technological innovations, but none can currently match the speed and power of a Top Fuel dragster. Overall, the discussion highlighted the thrill and danger of drag racing, as well as the ongoing pursuit of breaking records and pushing the limits of human experience.

    • Roller coaster fearMindset and past experiences can influence our fear of roller coasters. Some people overcome their fear by changing their mindset, while others grow to love the rides.

      Our fear of roller coasters and the physical sensations we experience on them can be influenced by our mindset and past experiences. Some people, like Tom, were initially scared of the drops and the feeling of falling, but once they changed their mindset and embraced the ride, they no longer felt that fear. Others, like Caroline, were initially scared but later grew to love roller coasters. The discussion also touched upon the role of evolution in our fear response and how our brains perceive falling or the anticipation of falling. The conversation was filled with personal stories and anecdotes, making it an engaging and informative exploration of the topic.

    • Overcoming FearEmbracing fear and trying new experiences can lead to enjoyment and personal growth. Habituation and repetition can help alleviate fear, and the fear of the unknown can sometimes prevent us from fully experiencing new places or situations.

      Pushing past fear and trying new experiences, even if initially met with dread or apprehension, can lead to enjoyment and personal growth. The speaker shares their own experiences with roller coasters and trying new things, noting that habituation and repetition can help alleviate fear. Tom Scott's video on fear was also mentioned as a catalyst for self-reflection and overcoming fears for both the speaker and viewers. Additionally, the discussion touched on the idea that the fear of the unknown can sometimes prevent us from fully experiencing and appreciating new places or situations. The failed video idea about the Afslut Dijk in the Netherlands was an example of this, as the speaker was unable to effectively capture the story on camera despite its historical and engineering significance.

    • Engaging content creationBalancing substance and style, experimenting, learning from failures, and continuous improvement are crucial elements in creating engaging content. Collaboration and fresh ideas from team members are essential to maintain audience interest and stay competitive.

      Creating engaging content, whether it's a music video or a podcast, requires a balance between substance and style. The content itself must be worth the audience's time and investment, but the presentation also plays a crucial role in keeping them engaged. The speaker in this conversation references Okay Go's music videos as an example, emphasizing that people don't attend their concerts solely for the music. Instead, they're drawn to the innovative visuals that complement the music. Moreover, the creative process involves experimentation and learning from failures. The speaker mentions that their team has had to raise their standards over time, leaving behind ideas that once seemed viable but no longer meet their current expectations. This continuous improvement is essential for maintaining the audience's interest and staying competitive in the content. Lastly, the speaker acknowledges that creating engaging content can be challenging and time-consuming, but the process itself is a rewarding experience. They emphasize the importance of collaboration and the role of team members, such as question producers, in bringing fresh ideas to the table. Ultimately, the goal is to create content that challenges and delights the audience, leaving them with a sense of discovery and learning.

    • Adapting to change in historyHistory shows us that staying flexible and open to change is crucial in both physical and digital realms, as evidenced by the evolution of a circular elevator shaft and YouTube.

      History, even in the digital world, is constantly evolving and adapting. The discussion touched upon the story of a New York City building with a circular elevator shaft, which became obsolete when elevators became rectangular. Similarly, YouTube, which started as a free video hosting platform, has evolved over the years to include monetization, mobile access, and openness to a wider audience. The importance of adapting to change was also emphasized, as Tom Scott shared his experiences with evolving content and technologies over the years. Overall, the conversation highlighted the importance of staying flexible and open to change in both physical and digital realms.

    Recent Episodes from Let's Learn Everything!

    64: Tom Scott, Human Acceleration, and Failed Videos

    64: Tom Scott, Human Acceleration, and Failed Videos

    How fast can a regular human accelerate from 0-60? How can you learn to love roller-coasters? And is there a terrifying experience Ella's done that even Tom Scott hasn't?? After having us on his show for so long, it's finally time for Tom Scott to join us on our show!

    Videos we Talk About:
    Tom Scott's Amazing Roller Coaster Video
    Tom Scott's Failed Video Video

    Timestamps:
    (00:00:00) Intro
    (00:04:15) Human Acceleration
    (00:50:03) Roller-coasters and Failed Videos
    (01:18:05) Outro

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    Join our Discord!

    We also learn about: herding cats and children, Thanks for the compliment you can leave now, UK metric is a mess, milk is just a blur cause it’s PastYourEyes, both Tom’s can’t be like this, stopping the angular velocity pedants, what’s so hard about orbital mechanics it’s not rocket science, this is a question full of "um actually"s, the longest second of Tom Scott’s life in the Mythen car, “would you do it again” “oh in a heartbeat”, just frame cars as IRL speedrunning, “oh my god she got sub 1 second”, please prove me wrong so I can ride it, steam catapulting a plane, the Nevis Catapult might win if you believe the hype, all politely saying roller coasters, “roller coaster nerds are like train nerds but worse”, running coasters at 100%, calibrating the weights of cars, British politeness way under-markets stealth, “I’ve done something Tom Scott hasn’t done??”, the experimental Nürburgring coaster that only operated for 4 days, Do-Dodonpa the “rattly bastard” that broke bones, dragsters going 0-60 in half a second stunned us to silence, you could buy the nitro X2 for less than a tesla but you do get to drive a tesla more than twice, “I reserve the right to turn this into a video essay”, our roller coaster journeys, dread and expectation, Ella loves the fear, “this is the worst thing I’ve ever done, YES”, LLE live episode on a roller coaster, Dick & Dom in da Bungalow sounds like a parody of something british, only americans will remember Raccoon Barrel from the Barrell Brothers! “It has been a metaphor which is possibly the highest priase I can give something like that”, making a video about failed videos “you only get to pull that trick once”, Tom’s one shot Netherlands drone video, “it was a Look How Clever I Am video”, ideally it’s both clever content and cleverly shot, “the content has to be worth it”, it’s like OKGO - matching content with production, the ratchet of quality, “the frustration I feel is a compliment to David”, “i left everything on the table”, 3 of us just mimed sword swallowing, "not a great mime"

    63: Biomimicry & The Evolution of Chess

    63: Biomimicry & The Evolution of Chess

    What can we learn by mimicking animals in nature, and more importantly, what can we learn about the nuance behind the buzzword of biomimicry?  And just how many wild facts are hidden in a simple chess set?

    Images we Talk About:
    One of the Oldest Shatranj Sets

    Timestamps:
    (00:00:00) Intro
    (00:03:26) Biomimicry
    (00:50:25) Chess Chess Evolution
    (01:33:41) Outro

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    Join our Discord!

    We also learn about: So nice to have a topic taken, biomemetics, the spider grabber is more like bio-stealing, “nature is a giant pool of ideas”, “nature is the OG and does it best, organism level, lily leaf umbrella, who remembers davinci? none of his flying machines even worked, a quick lesson on flying, biomimcry was only coines in the 1950s and only become trendy in the 90s, gecko feet, spinning the biomimicry slot machine, sheep wool antidepressants, a biomimicry quiz, oh right we want fewer train sonic booms, whale flipper tubercles, whale power turbines, Ella biomimics Caroline, termite AC, destroying nature to recreate nature, biomimicry 3.8, the ickyness of corporate biomimicry, we’re an organic sustainable biomemetic podcast, a person after our hearts critizing a ted talk, you can biomimic like davinci or the wright brothers, nature is not infallible, pitching our own biomimetic ideas, bumble bees saying oops, ripple, chess chess evolution you know like that game, can’t stop thinking about those anal beads, everything Caroline’s learned about chess is against their will, Tom learns about himself by talking about chess camp, scachs d’amor was so nerdy, the hornets nest of chess historians, chess comes from the indo-persian area, borders are weird why do I need so many modifiers to describe this area, calling it a horsey is more historically accurate, a chariot makes so much more sense than a castle moving across the board, oh wait does no one else call this piece a religious figure? the knight has been unchanged for 1300 years, the chad knight vs the virgin bishop, we codified white goes first after discovering quantum physics, do you want to play a game of king? Your king is in king, shah mat - the king is dead, people say check because “I won’t let you do the silly thing, we’re gonna keep playing for a little bit”, checkered comes from chess not the other way around, cheque -> exchequer -> checkered -> chess -> shah, why aren’t we talking about this more! Ella’s very good biomimicry review corner 

    Sources:

    Biomimicry as a Sustainable Design Methodology
    How Biomimicry is Inspiring Human Innovation
    Types of Biomimicry
    History of Biomimicry
    Velcro
    Biomimicry in Flight and Wing Design
    NASA Wing Morphing
    NASA Successfully Tests Shape-Changing Wing
    Japanese Bullet Train
    Whale Turbines
    WhalePower
    Soft Tobotics
    Tentacle Robot
    The Planned City of Lavasa
    Eastgate Centre
    Biomimicry 3.8
    The Limitations of Biomimentic Architecture
    The Ripple Device
    Mosquito Inspired Needles
    ---
    Davidson's Incredible "A Short History of Chess"
    Scachs Damor
    The Beginnings of Chess
    Oldest Shatranj Set
    The MET "Chessmen and Chess"
    Wired: The Game of Chess had Patch Notes Too
    White and Black in Chess
    The MET "Shah Mat!"
    gov.uk on The Exchequer
    Encyclopedia Britannica Chess History

    62: False Memories & House Plants

    62: False Memories & House Plants

    How much real science is there to the Mandela Effect, and how much should we be worried about our faulty memories?  And what's the science and history behind our long love for house plants?

    Timestamps:
    (00:00:00) Intro
    (00:03:31) False Memories
    (00:57:30) 
    (01:37:47) Outro

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    Yes Ella my favorite host of Let’s Learn Everything, Fiona Broome - Paranormal Researcher, Ella is shocked to learn the Mandela Effect was a conspiracy first, repressed memories, the McMcartin Preschool Trial again, the concept of memories at all is bonkers, we shoudl do more experiments, flashbulb memories aren’t as “unchanging as the slumbering rhinegold”, the original study didn’t even check if the memories were accurate they just assumed, flash bulb memories only Feel more accurate, the concept of false memories can make people believe in the mandela effect MORE, don’t have an existential crisis, rebunking your memories, most memory recalls aren’t adversarial like mandeal effect questions, Metamemory effects, just like memory isn’t so simple false memories aren’t so simple either, “I wish I hadn’t said yay when you said racism”, does anyone remember the 2 president Obamas? we gave false memories to bees, having false memories makes bees MORE complex not less, false memories aren’t flaws they’re just part of memory, classic meatbrain, “my brain is a beautiful and complex thing”, movies can exist, The Four Legged Chairs, the art of putting a plant into a pot, egyptians used plants for a ton of stuff, portable plants, gillyflowers for bad breath and paying rent, peppercorn payment, (ayyy), Wes Anderson’s The Winter Hotel for Plants, renting plants for a party, the illegal orchid trade, plant hunters, pteridomania, the World War 2 potted plant boom, the millenial urge to care for plants is more of a historic urge, guilting your cohosts into talking about your plants, you’d need 10 potted plant per square foot in the home to clean the air, just imagine yourself as a Sim you need art and plants, hot or not for plants, there aren’t really huge health benefits from plants, it feels like studies are asking “why do we like plants so much??”, just enjoy plants for the sake of enjoying them, office plants are nice but I feel like work life balance will do better for my health, I just think they’re neat! 

    Sources:
    Snopes: The Mandela Effect
    The Wiley Handbook on The Cognitive Neuroscience of Memory
    Ethan Watters: The Forgotten Lessons of the Recovered Memory Movement
    The False Memory Syndrome: Experimental studies and comparison to confabulations
    The Fallibility of Memory in Judicial Processes
    UCLA Med on Memory
    Implanting False Memories
    Hirst and Phelps Amazing Review of Flashbulb Memories
    Predicting Confidence in Flashbulb Memories (re: Michael Jackson)
    Fiona Broome: The Mandela Effect is Not False Memories
    False memory and COVID-19: How people fall for fake news about COVID-19 in digital contexts
    BBC on Mandela Effect
    False Memory in Bees Study
    Analysis of False Bee Memory Study
    Don Hertzfeldt On Memory
    ---
    National Museums Liverpool: Gardens in Ancient Egypt
    Britannica: Houseplants
    National Trust: A Potted History of Houseplants
    Horticultural Reviews, Volume 31, The Foliage Plant Industry
    Grace and Thorn: The History of Houseplants
    Cobham Museum: Windlesham- Peppercorn Payment
    The Plant Runner: A History of Houseplants
    The Scotsman: Our Fascination With Indoor Potted Plants has a Long and Colourful History
    Architectural Digest: The Most Iconic Houseplant Trends Through the Decades
    The Guardian: Indoor Plant Sales Boom, Reflecting Urbanisation and Design Trends
    The Telegraph: Houseplant Sales Soar
    2019 Paper: Potted Plants Do Not Improve Indoor Air Quality: A Review and Analysis of Reported VOC Removal Efficiencies
    University of Reading: Owning Houseplants Can Boost Your Mental Health – Here’s How to Pick the Right One
    2022 Paper: The Appearance of Indoor Plants and their Effect on People's Perceptions of Indoor Air Puality and Subjective Well-Being
    RHS: Houseplants: To Support Human Health
    2022 Paper: Effects of Indoor Plants on Human Functions: A Systematic Review with Meta-Analyses
    BBC: Are Your Houseplants Bad for the Environment?

    61: Whale Fall Ecology & Jury Duty

    61: Whale Fall Ecology & Jury Duty

    What happens when the largest living animal becomes the largest dead animal?  Just how complex could a dead whale be?  And what are the differences, flaws, and nuances of the jury system, and can we be studying it better?

    Images we Talk About:
    The Zombie Worm

    Timestamps:
    (00:00:00) Intro
    (00:03:59) Whale Fall Ecology
    (00:52:52) Jury Duty
    (01:32:41) Outro

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    Join our Discord!

    We also learn about: A bucket of mice, when whales die the people who love them will miss them, a jury of your cohosts will decide if your topic is boring, Tom stretching his arms to measure a 34 meter long whale, marine snow and whale falls, gettin ghastly gassy, a new mussel told us to go check out the whale fall, whales are mortal, deep sea mussel delicacy, how hard could it be to find a whale over 70% of the earth’s surface? let’s just wait for the carcass to come to us… wait actually?? welcome to our automatic zoo of dead things on the beach brought to you by the crown, sinking beached whale carcasses, the 3 stages of whale fall, Denial/Mobile Scavenger Phase can take 2 years, scavengers eat about one (1) Caroline of whale per day, Enrichment Opportunist Phase, Sulfophilic Phase, 7% of a whale is bone lipid, a sulfur bacteria carpet. did we walk into Caroline’s trap? This final phase can last 100 years! It’s not a trap if I’m asking you a question! 690,000 whale falls at any time, never in my wildest dreams would i be so lucky as to know the 12km distance from fall to fall statistic, whaling is deforestation for bacteria, Osedax or the zombie worm or the bone devourer or snot flower, there’s Drama in this whale fall ecosystem, dinosaur fall ecosystems, fossilized bones with fossilized deep sea snails, we got picked to talk about jury duty, UK US differences, a 900 day trial, there’s something wrong with Ella, the US is the only country to have so many civil juries, this topic has become a US UK debate, only the US requires unanimity, juror selection bias, racially diverse juries do a better job, I wish we could be surprised peremptory challenge is biased against women, oops it’s a british colinization topic, you could literally say too many asians, semi-jural systems, is this a philosophy topic about human nature?? our various biases, the confirmation bias against tom’s bad jokes, can we study jury bias? there hasn’t been any research on live jury deliberation.

    Sources:
    NatGeo: Dead whales are washing up on the East Coast.
    NHM: Whale Fall: What Happens When Whales Die?
    Review of the Impact of Whale Fall on Biodiversity in Deep-Sea Ecosystems (2022)
    The Discovery of a Natural Whale Fall in the Antarctic Deep Sea (2013)
    NPR: What Happens After A Whale Dies?
    Scientific American: Life at the Bottom: The Prolific Afterlife of Whales
    Fish Food in the Deep Sea: Revisiting the Role of Large Food-Falls (2014)
    NatGeo: Making a Home on Plesiosaurs
    Chemosynthesis-Based Sssociations on Cretaceous Plesiosaurid Carcasses (2008)
    ---
    Cornell Law: What is Jury Duty?
    Jury Law UK
    Magna Carta
    538: Jury Duty is Rare
    Jury Service in the UK
    Juror Exemptions and Exclusions USA
    Differences between US and UK Legal Systems
    Jury Duty in UK vs USA
    UK Civil Case Info
    "Justifying Prohibited
    Peremptory Challenges (2007)"
    Jury Under Fire: Jury Selection Can Effectively Identify Biased Jurors
    NACDL: Bias in Jury Selection
    EJI: History of Bias in Jury Selection
    Comparison of Juries in Democratic Countries (2007)
    Jury Trial in different countries
    World Jury Sytems: Exporting the English Jury System (2000)
    Monash Law: Do we need juries?
    Cognitive and Human Factors in Legal Layperson Decision Making: Sources of bias in Juror Decision Making (2022)
    Thomas Lecture on Jury Bias
    The Curious Case of the Jury-Shaped Hole (2023)

    60: Near Earth Objects & Guitar Tabs

    60: Near Earth Objects & Guitar Tabs

    What are all these rocks hurtling through space? Do we need to worry about them, and what can we learn from them? And what are guitar tabs, why don't people take them seriously, and why does Tom love them so dang much?

    Videos we Talk About:
    Osiris Boop Gif

    Timestamps:
    (00:00:00) Intro
    (00:03:54) Near Earth Objects
    (00:56:58) Guitar Tabs
    (01:47:55) Outro

    Support us with a Max Fun Membership!

    Join our Discord!

    e|-----------------|-----------------|-----------------|-----------------| B|-----------------|-----------------|-----------------|-----------------| G|-----------------|-----------------|-----------------|-----------------| D|-----------------|-----------------|-----------------|-----------------|
    A|---------------2-|-----------4-6-4-|-----------6-7-0-|-----------6-7---| E|-0---------2-4---|-----------------|-----------------|---------------0-|

    (tabs via lucamashup)

    e|----------------
    B|----------------
    G|----------------
    D|-8888-10-10-333-
    A|-8888-10-10-333-
    E|-6666-8--8--111-

    We also learn about:

    I thought you were just going to just teach us guitar, still on course to learn everything in a few months! everyone’s favorite part: semantics and exceptions, Tom is a perfectly unmovable object, it’s doxxing myself if people know I’m the center of the universe, the great attractor was my nickname in high school, “naturally occurring objects traveling through our solar system which are smaller than planets and aren’t moons”, you must be 1 meter tall to be an asteroid, asteroids are metally comets are icy, a song of rock and metal dust and ice, asteroid/comet -> meteoroid -> meteor -> meteorite, 1.3 million known asteroids and only 3,800 comets in our solar system, within 50 million km it becomes a near earth object, obviously we’re all thinking about the Tunguska asteroid asteroid, 80 million trees felled and it didn’t even hit the Earth, one of the oldest meteors we know is from 2 billion years ago, the vredefort dome, 2 billion year old nuclear weapon testing??? the only time the earth makes Shatter Cones is meteors and nuclear explosions, if the meteor had hit the water it might not have been so catastrophic for dinosaurs, but it was going 20 kilometers per SECOND, a force 10,000 times the world nuclear arsenal, the crater has to be DISCOVERED, what does it mean for 50% of species to go extinct, the asteroid also vaporized the ground and water, impact winter, stopping photosynthesis kicks out the base of the foodchain, the meteor that broke the camel’s back, land animals over 25kg went extinct, there were a few lucky ducks, LLE Meteor Insurance, as long as Aerosmith is alive we’re fine, Asteroid Watch via the Center for Near Earth Object Studies, people listening 100 years from now hope you don’t have any asteroids (sucks to suck), Planetary Defense Coordination Office, Double Asteroid Redirct Mission, I cheered when we smashed into that asteroid, activating asteroids, asteroids are loose remaining legos from the formation of the solar system, OSIRIS-REx sample return, a kid named Bennu, tom loses his mind at the video of Osiris booping Bennu, personifying Rex, OSIRIS APEX, Apophis will be closer than some satellites, POV Apophis shots, Astroid Quakes, “cute is a weird way to describe a spacecraft touching an asteroid”, casual Caroline classical guitar lore drop, Tom learns guitar by accident, “too bad I picked this up so late”, Ella’s youtube ukulele era, don’t stop believing, tabs aren’t shittier sheet music, Van Halen didn’t invent tabs, tabs feel modern but also obvious, just because words are more efficient doesn’t mean diagrams aren’t useful, I’m just trying to play Don’t Stop Believing I have to worry about context? Guqin tablature dates to the 7th century! music has a lot of racism, rockin out those lute tabs, I knew this was secretly a font topic! monospace fonts revitalized tabs, sheet music software is garbage, god did not want me to use LaTeX they wanted me to use my mortal hands, OLGA, reading Beyonce tabs is not the same as listening to Beyonce, Paul McCartney’s the one who plays Blackbird wrong, let the philosophy professor enjoy his guitar! why punish the people who love your work, tabs are in a gray zone still, ultimate-guitar has a monopoly, the gray zone may benefit publishers, thanks swifties, Thomas Chesney’s tab research, it’s not a million miles away but it’s not right, ooh this song’s so commercially viable! Polphia’s tabs, Pinegrove’s tabs released before the songs, Tom’s guitar tabs, being a part of someone’s music journey in a little way, this could have been a guitar tab podcast, a cozy review corner.

    Sources:
    The Structure of the Milky Way
    The Great Attractor
    Nasa on Orbital Debris
    Asteroids vs Comets vs Meteors
    Nasa on Asteroids
    Notable Asteroid Impacts
    Tunguska Event
    Atomic Asteroid Blasts
    Vredefort Impact Structure
    NASA on the Dinosaur Extincting Asteroid
    NHM: Why did the dinosaurs die out?
    Near Earth Objects
    DART
    Asteroid Watch
    Asteroid Watch Dashboard
    DART results
    Nasa Data on Bennu
    OSIRIS REx Touch Down
    Bennu Sample Analysis
    Nasa Data on Apophis
    ESA's Possible RAMSES Mission
    ---
    NPR on Online Tabs
    Van Halen Tab Interview
    Mick Goodrick's The Advancing Guitarist
    Yang Yuanzheng on Ancient Guqin Tablature
    Solitary Orchid on the Guqin
    Tantacrul's Critique of Sheet Music Software
    Laura Gary's Amazing Legal Analysis of Tabs
    Paul McCartney on Blackbird
    NYTimes on Guitar Tab Legal Troubles
    Ultimate-Guitars Licensing
    Chesney's Paper Studying Guitar Tab Authors
    Polyphia Tabs
    Pinegrove Tabs NPR Interview
    Tom's Habanero Tabs
    Newspeak Dictionary

    59: Quantum Physics & Gossip

    59: Quantum Physics & Gossip

    Can Tom finally take on his science communication white whale: Quantum Physics??  And what is gossip, what did it mean in the past, and could it actually be... good??  Find out on a very special MaxFunDrive episode!

    See all the MaxFunDrive events, pins, and links here!

    Timestamps:
    (00:00:00) Intro
    (00:06:29) Quantum Physics
    (01:00:14) MaxFunDrive!
    (01:09:08) Gossip
    (01:44:14) Outro

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    Join our Discord!

    We also learn about:

    One minute of self indulgence, another bit?? when bugs gossip, Moby Dick was warning about the perils of teaching quantum physics, the word quantum is boring,  every grocery list is quantum (except Ella’ infinite and continuous grocery list), Ocean’s 11 is a quantum movie, quantum physics is 100 years old, why doesn’t my toaster blast me with radiation, Lord Rayleigh is literally the why is the sky blue guy, Planck really didn’t want to be right, “an act of desperation”, you’re taught quantum physics in high school chemistry, Heisenberg v Pauli v Schrodinger beef, fully just saying jackass, even smart people hate quantum physics, “nobody feels perfectly comfortable with it”, YOU ALREADY KNOW QUANTUM PHYSICS, Newton has been redeemed! we almost called photons “quantums”, some of quantum physics is bullshit but not all of it is, what has quantum physics ever done for us? we do actually have a quantum phone and quantum machines at the hospital, Quantum Nuclear MRI machines, sometimes it’s nice to remember that, Schrodinger's Cat is the worst first thing to learn, “not a real experiment, does not prove anything, does not match physical reality, and was intentionally designed to be absurd”, it’s like learning about vision through only optical illusions, “but where’s the weird?”, making peace with your whale, as long as you support us we will live forever, no Ella, there’s nothing wrong with you, “debrief”, gossip can be positive! GODSIB MEANT GOD SIBLING, you wouldn’t bang your godbrother, Tom you don’t have kids, in the 12th century you could leave your kids to watch Dune 2 whenever you wanted, a gossip is someone you can tell anything to, gossips were backup for lecherous men, gossip was a neutral term for an essential supportive community, gossiping about witches gossiping “that’s gossip as well babe”, spoiler for most social issues it’s about class and power,  scold’s bridle, “I love idle talk, I’m a witch”, coffee houses are just gossip houses, “oooh yeah, evolution and gossip, this is good stuff”, we wouldn’t be humans if we weren’t sociable and idle talking, gossiping is like primate grooming, animals would LOVE to gossip if they had language, I don’t care what you think as long as it’s about me, work stopping gossip seems neutral but isn’t, I’m not gossiping I’m receiving evaluative information about a colleague, it’s good the science doesn’t show bullying is cool actually, most gossip is neutral gossip, I wouldn’t compliment my boss - only in gossip, you think it’s not gossip cause it’s about Tom Brady?? It is!! it’s all preamble for review corner.

    Sources:
    Melville's Book on Quantum Physics
    Dan Styer's Amazing Brief History of Quantum Physics
    Dan Styer's Textbook "The Strange World of Quantum Mechanics"
    Futurama Quantum Joke
    Chad Orzel on the Origin of Quantum Physics
    Helge Kragh's History of Planck as "The Reluctant Revolutionary"
    Heisenberg's Letter to Pauli (s/o to u/restricteddata)
    Gilbert Lewis' Naming of the Photon
    Chad Orzel "What Has Quantum Mechanics Ever Done For Us?"
    Old Computers
    Nobel Prize Committee on Bloch's Work
    Dr. Baird's Great Analysis of Schrodinger's Cat
    ---
    Gossip and Resistance Among the Medieval Peasantry
    From the Whisper Network to #MeToo—Framing Gender, Gossip and Sexual Harassment
    Envy, Poison, and Death: Women on Trial in Classical Athens, Chapter 3.2
    The Psychological Anatomy of Gossip
    Tell Me the Gossip: The Self-Evaluative Function of Receiving Gossip About Others
    BBC Worklife: The Surprising Benefits of Gossip
    Gossip in Evolutionary Perspective
    How the “Gossip” Became a Woman
    Gossip and Gender Differences: a Content Analysis Approach
    BBC Worklife: Why Gossiping at Work is Good For You

    Go Fact Yourself MaxFunDrive Kick-off Spectacular featuring Ella Hubber, Tom Lum, Teresa McElroy, Ross Blocher, and Jordan Morris

    Go Fact Yourself MaxFunDrive Kick-off Spectacular featuring Ella Hubber, Tom Lum, Teresa McElroy, Ross Blocher, and Jordan Morris

    IT'S THE MAXFUNDRIVE!!!  And we're kicking it off with a network-wide trivia competition with other MaxFun hosts!

    You can see all our upcoming events during the drive and become a member at www.LetsLearnEverything.com

    This special network wide event is a celebration of the MaxFunDrive! If you’d like to support podcasts you love for just $5 a month and get bonus gifts in the process, go to maximumfun.org/join.

    J. Keith van Straaten and Helen Hong from “Go Fact Yourself” are joined by:
    Teresa McElroy - “Shmanners”
    Ross Blocher - “Oh No, Ross and Carrie!”
    Ella Hubber & Tom Lum - “Let’s Learn Everything!”
    Jordan Morris - “Jordan, Jesse, Go!” and "Free With Ads"

    If you’d like to hear more hosts competing for trivia supremacy, visit Maximumfun.org for the full version of this show.

    58: Kelly & Zach Weinersmith, Mars Ecology, and Space Communes

    58: Kelly & Zach Weinersmith, Mars Ecology, and Space Communes

    What would a man-made ecosystem look like on mars?  Just how complicated could it possibly be?   And are the human and societal issues just as complicated?  Science communicators and authors Zach and Dr. Kelly Weinersmith ask and answer all of these questions and more!

    Check out: 

    A City on Mars!
    The Weinersmith's article on Frontier Mythology and Space
    The Weinersmith's paper in the journal Space Policy on Space Communes
    BeaWolf
    Saturday Morning Breakfast Cereal

    Timestamps:
    (00:00:00) Intro
    (00:05:30) Marts Ecology
    (00:47:28) Space Communes
    (01:11:59) Outro

    Support us with a Max Fun Membership!

    Join our Discord!

    We also learn about: The superior Weinersmith, we almost have a Doctorate majority but not quite, having a PHD doesn’t make you smarter it just makes you poor and willing to suffer, back in my day Comic-Con was only 2 pence, we only just learned about high perchlorates on mars soil, all those images of glass habitats on mars would be SO DEAD, “this doesn’t sound appealing to me… to live under the dirt”, just rinse off all your dirt how hard could it be, the engineer brain thinking “if a problem is solvable then the problem is solved”, apologies to the rotating space colony community, space waste is a pain in the ass, cows aren’t efficient but BUGS are, Biosphere 1 is Earth, Lunar palace, there aren’t many experiments and we don’t really know how this all scales, if Sarah goes we’re fine and if I go I destroy the colony by BREATHING TOO MUCH, everything’s more complicated in space, Lungs help your facility PVNRT, humanity needs a plan B but “a backup that loses that much ground on human rights is not a backup i want!”, historiography of space: history of how we think about the history of space, being a wet blanket about frontier mythology - you are speaking to the right people, “there are beautiful dreams, but I feel like the beautiful dreams tend to crack when you look at them with a little more detail”, “cows are just a nonstarter in space”, goat cheese pizza was great for morale, finally we can stop poisoning ourselves with taro, vegans are great on mars, the only life threatening scorpion you can find the US makes it onto Noah’s ark, solar is great but not when there’s dust storms, we have dormant nuclear reactors in space, Simpson reactors, in conclusion: we’re not ready, it’s not as easy as making a terrarium, closed loop ecologies are not normal, who knows what happens 10 years in, “this is the problem with talking to Zach and I”, the superior Weinsersmith has subsumed the other in a violent coup, this isn’t a hypothetical: “there’s answers to these questions”, mars religion, you can’t take your barbies and go home on mars, literally no one wanted to do dish duty, SELL THEIR HOUSES TO WHO BEN FUCKING AQUAMAN, “being able to leave is HUGE for so many reasons”, “so Zach and I are both cowards”, speculating is good to imagine problems to avoid them which is maybe the least funny answer I’ve given, “you can’t jump back to roman law”, “I think the book is much better because of our conflicts”, going on research walks,  we don’t have time for space law, “that’s not a common response Tom”

    Sources:
    A City on Mars!
    The Weinersmith's article on Frontier Mythology and Space
    The Weinersmith's paper in the journal Space Policy on Space Communes