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    47. Wildfires, Cops, and Keggers

    en-usNovember 02, 2011

    Podcast Summary

    • The Unintended Consequences of ElectionsElections can have unexpected effects, such as deforestation, increased crime rates, and delayed beer tax increases. Off-year elections give individuals more influence on policy outcomes and special interest groups can have a disproportionate impact.

      Elections can have unintended consequences, including deforestation, wildfires, and even crime rates. Incumbents may delay beer tax increases before elections in order to appeal to beer-drinking voters. Off-year elections with lower voter turnout can have a disproportionate impact, allowing special interest groups like teachers' unions to achieve pay increases. These side effects of elections are rarely discussed on official political platforms, but academic research is shedding light on their existence. While voting generally matters less than people think, off-year elections present an opportunity for individuals to have a greater influence on policy outcomes. And if you're throwing a keg party after an election, make sure it's not during the year after an election, as beer tax increases may have kicked in.

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