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    406. Can You Hear Me Now?

    en-usFebruary 20, 2020

    Podcast Summary

    • The FCC's Evolving Role in Technology & CommunicationThe FCC oversees communication technologies beyond just economics, with decisions impacting society, security, and politics. Current issues include net neutrality and combating robocalls, making the FCC's regulatory role crucial for all.

      The Federal Communications Commission (FCC) is a vital government institution that has evolved over time as technology and communication have advanced. Although its jurisdiction covers radio, TV, satellite, wire, and cable communication, its scope is beyond just economic implications. Its decisions affect society, security, and politics too. The most contentious issue currently is net neutrality. Led by FCC Chairman Ajit Pai, the fight questions if the internet should be governed by engineers or bureaucrats. Another issue that FCC is dealing with is the massive number of robocalls made every year. The FCC is working to combat this problem as it poses a risk to the American consumer. As such, the FCC's role in regulating communication impacts everyone and should be closely watched.

    • Ajit Pai's Commitment to Consumer Protection and Fighting RobocallsAjit Pai, Chairman of the FCC, supports consumer protection by enforcing laws like the TRACED Act, which prosecutes robocallers and requires phone providers to update their caller I.D. frameworks.

      Ajit Pai, Chairman of the FCC, has made consumer protection a top priority through regulation and enforcement of laws like the TRACED Act. This legislation extends the statute of limitations for the FCC to prosecute robocallers and mandates that phone providers update their caller I.D. authentication framework, which can block robocalls by default. Pai recognizes that rampant robocalls not only harm consumers, but also undermine public confidence in the phone system. Pai's philosophy as a regulator walks the fine line between what's bad for consumers and what's bad for business, though he has shown a commitment to protecting consumers through measures like the TRACED Act.

    • The Free-Market Approach of Ajit Pai to Regulation at FCCAjit Pai, FCC Chairman, supports open market innovation and removal of regulatory underbrush. His policy positively affects consumers by encouraging investment in broadband and streamlining wireless infrastructure deployment.

      Ajit Pai, the current chairman of the Federal Communications Commission, is known for his free-market approach to regulation. He opposes highly regulatory practices and finds opportunities for innovation in the open market. Pai was appointed to the commission during President Obama's term and became chairman under President Trump. He has since worked to remove regulatory underbrush that was created during the Obama administration, such as prioritizing fiber over copper telephone networks and streamlining the process for deploying wireless infrastructure. Pai's approach has had a positive impact on consumers, encouraging investment in high-capacity, high-quality broadband and making it easier to deploy wireless infrastructure. Additionally, he has abolished archaic regulations, such as the requirement to maintain a hard copy of broadcast licenses, which is readily available online.

    • The Debate Over Net Neutrality and Ajit Pai's Stance on the IssueAjit Pai repealed the net neutrality ruling, choosing to regulate the internet through market-based approaches. However, those in favor of net neutrality argue that consumers could be hurt without regulation. The importance of informed debates is crucial to make the best decision for the Internet economy.

      Ajit Pai's repeal of the net neutrality ruling was met with intense blowback, with legal and internet scholars criticizing the move. Pai defended his decision, stating that he believes net neutrality involves the question of how the government should regulate the internet. He argued for a more market-based approach, allowing the internet to develop organically and regulate any competitive conduct through competition laws administered by the FTC and DOJ. However, those in favor of net neutrality argue that consumers would be hurt if phone companies shut down copper-wire networks without providing an alternative. Pai's decision to repeal the ruling, but institute a much stronger transparency rule highlighted the importance of informed debates to ensure the best decision for the Internet economy.

    • The Repeal of Net Neutrality: Uncertainty, Arrogance, and LoopholesThe repeal of net neutrality laws created uncertainty, discouraged investment, and gave the F.C.C. excessive authority. Loopholes, like zero-rating, remain a concern for consumer and company alike. The debate and its impact are ongoing.

      The decision to repeal net neutrality laws raised consternation and even personal threats, reflecting a lack of civility and respect in American democracy. Despite the forbearance of some Title II regulations, the uncertainty of future forbearance and the catch-all general conduct standard created doubts among banks and discouraged those requiring capital expenditures to build broadband networks. Furthermore, the F.C.C. arrogated to itself more authority to address problems that hadn't even materialized yet, potentially causing problems for consumers and companies alike. The loophole of zero-rating, which allows internet providers to designate certain websites as not counting towards a customer's data usage, was one example where wireless companies were targeted. It remains to be seen how the net neutrality debate and its impact will continue to unfold.

    • The Controversy Surrounding the Repeal of Net-Neutrality in 2018The repeal of net-neutrality has created controversy with opponents claiming it will favor large corporations and harm consumers. Despite ongoing litigation, the F.C.C. Chairman believes technology advancements will negate the need for regulation by 2030.

      The repeal of net-neutrality by the F.C.C. in 2018 has created controversy, with opponents arguing that it favors large corporations and hurts consumers. While some tech companies and consumer-advocacy groups sued the F.C.C. for overreach, the U.S. Court of Appeals for the D.C. Circuit ruled that states should be allowed to impose their own net-neutrality laws. However, F.C.C. Chairman Ajit Pai believes that net-neutrality will be viewed as a thing of the past by 2030. He is optimistic that innovations in technology such as 5G and satellite connectivity will provide a competitive alternative to fixed broadband and negate the need for regulation. The outcome of ongoing litigation related to the T-Mobile and Sprint merger is uncertain, with the F.C.C. hoping for a win against a minority of partisan state attorneys general.

    • The Benefits and Conditions of the T-Mobile-Sprint MergerThe merger created a stronger competitor with the capital to build 5G infrastructure and promises to deploy it to nearly all Americans within six years. Dish was created as a fourth competitor, and the FCC is enforcing strict conditions to ensure compliance.

      The T-Mobile-Sprint merger was necessary because a combined competitor would be stronger and better equipped to handle the capital required to build the small-cell infrastructure for 5G. Different companies also have spectrum assets that are worth more together. The merger ensures that consumers will benefit with promises of deploying 5G to 97 percent of American consumers within three years and 99 percent within six years. Dish has been created as the fourth wireless competitor, divested from Sprint, and given network access with T-Mobile. The FCC has enforced aggressive steps to ensure that the merger conditions are met to avoid penalties in the billions of dollars.

    • The Importance of Monitoring Market DynamicsRegulators must adapt to the constantly changing market to avoid outdated regulations. While free markets are generally preferred, market power can create imperfections. Government involvement may be necessary for public interest.

      The market is very dynamic and changes quickly, with articles from 2001 and 2007 discussing potential monopolies in instant messaging and social networking no longer relevant today. Regulators should not have a static view of the market, as it rapidly becomes outdated. While economists generally argue for free markets, there are cases where market power creates an imperfect competitive market. In terms of wireless competition in the U.S., there are four national carriers, regional carriers, cable companies, and new companies entering the market, leading to improved competition and lower prices. However, building a wireless network is expensive, and spectrum availability is essential. The government may need to get involved in certain areas, such as upgrading the 9-1-1 system, to further the public interest.

    • The Challenges of Building a Reliable 5G NetworkBuilding a 5G network requires a massive physical buildout, lots of power, and access to limited mobile spectrum. The F.C.C. faces challenges in freeing up more spectrum, and must determine the most valued uses for that spectrum.

      The rollout of 5G is the next generation of wireless connectivity that will be 100 times faster and more responsive than 4G. However, a reliable 5G network requires a massive physical buildout, tremendous amounts of electrical power, and a significant amount of 'harmonized mobile spectrum,' a limited resource overseen by different government agencies. The F.C.C. oversees the commercial spectrum but faces the challenge of freeing up more spectrum for consumers with other agencies holding it. The highest and best use of the spectrum has been a longstanding question for the F.C.C., with conventional wisdom dictating that the chairman or a majority of the F.C.C. should choose winners and losers in terms of deciding the most valued uses.

    • National Priority: The Auctioning of Spectrum for 5GThe deployment of 5G is a crucial goal for the US, as it will revolutionize various sectors of the economy. However, the risks associated with cybersecurity must be addressed for safe and secure communication.

      The auctioning off of spectrum without restrictions on how companies can use it, in line with the private sector's highest valued use, has made the rollout of 5G a national priority. The desire to 'win' the 5G race is driven both by a geopolitical component and the ability to deliver value for the American consumer. 5G is expected to transform various sectors of the economy, including virtual and augmented reality-based gaming and telemedicine, allowing doctors to provide high-resolution views of patients' dermatological problems. However, some critics suggest that this speed and intensity of communication may come at the expense of cybersecurity.

    • The Importance of Strong Cybersecurity in the Age of 5GWith the increasing number of connected devices in the 5G era comes a greater risk of cyber attacks. The FCC proposal to ban equipment from companies posing national security threats, such as Huawei and Z.T.E., is vital to protecting against potential risks.

      As the world moves towards more connected devices with the rollout of 5G, there are increased concerns regarding cybersecurity. This is because the connected devices create a larger attack surface that bad actors can target. It is crucial to ensure that 5G networks are strong and secure to protect against potential threats. The FCC proposal spearheaded by Pai seeks to prohibit the use of equipment from companies that pose national security threats, such as Chinese telecommunications giants Huawei and Z.T.E. This move is necessary due to China's national intelligence law, which requires companies to comply with requests from intelligence services and prohibits disclosure of such requests. The risk posed by these Chinese companies is not one that the American consumer or government should take.

    • The Risks Posed by Chinese Technology Companies and Quantum ComputingChinese technology companies and government interference could threaten American consumers and installations. Quantum computing also poses a risk of data breaches, adding to concerns of Chinese involvement. Legislation is being considered to replace Huawei equipment.

      Chinese technology companies, including Huawei, pose a potential risk to American consumers and government installations due to concerns over Chinese government interference. There is currently legislation being considered in Congress to fund the replacement of existing Huawei equipment with American-made or other equipment. Another concern is the potential threat of quantum computing, which could allow for the breaking of currently-encrypted communications and data breaches on a massive scale. The Chinese government's involvement in quantum computing technologies adds to these concerns. The 2015 hack of the Office of Personnel Management, speculated to be orchestrated by the People's Liberation Army, highlights the scale of data breaches and why foreign government interference is a valid concern.

    • The Threat of Chinese Intelligence Gathering and FCC's LimitationsChinese intelligence gathering poses a unique threat to both its own citizens and other nations. Despite this, the FCC is unable to regulate content, leaving it to tech companies to self-police. This lack of transparency can lead to harmful outcomes for users.

      The Chinese Communist Party's intelligence activities combine abilities with malign intent - to harm their own people and to steal technologies from other countries. This is a different kind of threat from traditional intelligence gathering and analysis pursued by other countries. However, the FCC is not authorized to regulate content and media issues, including bot-driven media, foreign interference, and fake news. It is difficult to determine what constitutes a permissible view and what does not, making regulation almost impossible. Despite this, publicly held firms such as Google and Facebook lack transparency about how their products operate and they are largely left to police themselves until an algorithm cheats someone.

    • F.C.C. Chairman urges transparency and discusses challenges with China's manufacturing dominance.The importance of transparency in business practices for tech firms and broadband providers and the challenges faced by F.C.C. successors with China's manufacturing dominance. Chairman Pai proposes the Congress reserve a percentage of the recent 5G spectrum auction proceeds for rural broadband deployment.

      F.C.C. Chairman Pai emphasizes the importance of transparency in business practices for tech firms and broadband providers. While the F.C.C. has jurisdiction over broadband providers, they do not directly regulate tech firms. Pai predicts that in the future, F.C.C. successors will face challenges with China's manufacturing dominance and whether a free-market approach or a unified industrial policy is better. The recent 5G spectrum auction generated over $6 billion, which by law must be deposited into the U.S. Treasury for deficit reduction. Pai proposes the Congress reserve a percentage of the proceeds for rural broadband deployment, a cause he supports.

    • Ajit Pai on Private-Sector Innovation and Competitive BiddingThe successful model of private-sector innovation and competitive bidding for the spectrum may not work for other natural resources like oil, but it has been effective. Ajit Pai has no concrete plans for the future.

      Ajit Pai believes the successful model of allowing private-sector innovation to flourish and getting a return for the public fisc, which has been applied to the spectrum, may not necessarily be applicable to other natural resources like oil. However, he agrees that the competitive bidding approach has been successful for all involved. When asked about his plans for the future, he mentions a humorous anecdote about Judge Judy, but otherwise has no specific aspirations to share at this time.

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