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    Why Apartment Building Developers Are Sitting on Empty Lots

    en-usJune 04, 2024

    Podcast Summary

    • Impact of Unexpected FactorsUnexpected factors like human risk and social media-driven movements can significantly impact industries and institutions. Staying informed and adaptable can help mitigate these risks.

      Unexpected factors, such as human risk in business or social media-driven labor movements, can significantly impact industries and institutions. Mimecast's collaboration security solution helps organizations mitigate these risks. During a heated congressional hearing, Attorney General Merrick Garland defended the Justice Department against political attacks. Meanwhile, a group of pharmacists has successfully used social media to encourage unionization among their peers, demonstrating the power of technology and grassroots organizing. These events underscore the importance of staying informed and adaptable in the face of unexpected challenges. For more information on Mimecast, visit their website.

    • Pharmacy labor movementThe 'pizza is not working' labor movement in the pharmacy industry is driven by a desire for workers to have a voice in staffing levels and wages, leading to a push for unionization and improved labor conditions.

      The "pizza is not working" labor movement in the pharmacy industry is driven by a desire for workers to have a voice in determining staffing levels and be heard, beyond just being offered pizza as a solution. This core frustration has led to a push for unionization, along with demands for improved wages, benefits, and other labor concerns. Pharmacy chains like CVS and Walgreens have responded by supporting workers' right to unionize or not, and focusing on individual conversations to address concerns. The volatile stock market, with recent drops following a May rally, and a decrease in job openings in the US, will be closely watched as the jobs report approaches. Ultimately, this movement highlights the importance of workers feeling heard and valued, and the potential impact of labor organizing on industries and markets.

    • Apartment construction challengesInterest rate rise, bank issues, and stagnant rent growth have led to a 45% increase in time between construction authorization and start, totaling nearly 500 days.

      The apartment construction industry is facing challenges due to various factors. Two years ago, the rise in interest rates made projects less financially viable, and banks have had their own issues with commercial real estate loans. Additionally, high rents, while still profitable, are no longer showing significant growth, making it harder for investors to justify funding new projects. As a result, the average time between construction authorization and actual start has increased by 45% to nearly 500 days. For more information on collaboration security to help mitigate human risk in your organization, visit mimecast.com.

    • Real Estate Market ShiftDevelopers respond to oversupply and rent cuts by making projects smaller and seeking alternative funding sources. US prosecutors investigate a suspected global hacking operation targeting opponents of Elliott Management and ExxonMobil, with a focus on an Israeli private investigator and DCI Group. Unpredictable weather events like derechos could pose a greater threat to summer travel plans.

      The real estate market, particularly in cities with high new construction and rapid rent growth, is experiencing a shift due to oversupply and rent cuts. Developers are adjusting by making projects smaller and seeking alternative funding sources. Meanwhile, in the world of investigations, US prosecutors are looking into a suspected global hacking operation targeting opponents of Elliott Management and ExxonMobil, with a focus on an Israeli private investigator and DCI Group, a PR firm that has worked with both entities. Regarding summer travel, meteorologists warn that unpredictable weather events like derechos, which are powerful straight-line windstorms, could pose a greater threat to travel plans than traditional inconveniences like traffic jams and crowded airports.

    • Severe weather and air travelChecking government run websites like Aviation Weather Center and Storm Prediction Center can help travelers prepare for potential severe weather disruptions during air travel and plan accordingly

      Severe weather systems, such as thunderstorms that can span over 100 miles and move quickly, can significantly disrupt air travel by forcing planes to detour around them, potentially adding hours to flight durations. To help travelers prepare for potential disruptions, government run websites like the Aviation Weather Center and Storm Prediction Center provide information about the likelihood of severe weather along flight routes in the run-up to trips. While weather conditions can never be guaranteed, checking these resources can give travelers a good sense of what to expect and help them plan accordingly. As vacation planning can be time-consuming and overwhelming, listeners are encouraged to send in their vacation planning questions for potential discussion on the show. Produced by Pierre Bienaime, Anthony Bancey, and Michael Kosmidis, this segment was brought to you by Mimecast, the collaboration security solution that helps organizations identify and mitigate human risk. For more information, visit mimecast.com.

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