Logo
    Search

    What summer heat waves mean for prisons

    enJune 05, 2024

    Podcast Summary

    • New York City congestion pricing delayGovernor Hochul's decision to halt New York City's congestion pricing implementation has sparked debate over tax burden and political motivations, leaving the future uncertain

      The implementation of congestion pricing in New York City, which has been in the works for decades, has been put on hold by Governor Kathy Hochul just weeks before it was set to begin. This news comes as a shock to many, especially considering the economic significance of New York City and the traffic congestion issues it faces. The decision has sparked debate over who should bear the tax burden and the potential political motivations behind the delay. The situation is perplexing, and it will be interesting to see how it unfolds, particularly in terms of fundraising and lobbying efforts.

    • Walking vs Uber, Climate Change, PrisonsWalking in the city saves time and money compared to taking an Uber, but the country faces extreme heatwaves and lack of air conditioning in prisons highlights the need for addressing climate change and social issues through daily choices and policy

      During my recent stay in New York, I experienced firsthand the benefits of walking instead of taking an Uber in the city, both in terms of time and cost. Meanwhile, the country is facing a severe heatwave, with records being broken in the western US, highlighting the infrastructure consequences and potential dangers of climate change. A particularly concerning issue is the lack of air conditioning in prisons during these extreme temperatures, which advocates argue constitutes cruel and unusual punishment. The disclosure of financial data related to a specific decision may shed light on this issue, but the specifics are uncertain. Overall, these experiences underscore the importance of considering both the environmental and social impacts of our daily choices and the role of policy in addressing pressing issues.

    • Prison heat crisisPeople in prison are dying due to extreme heat, leading to unrest among guards and increased violence. Basic human dignity should be prioritized, and systemic change is necessary to address this issue.

      The extreme heat conditions in some prisons across the United States have reached a critical point, leading to serious health concerns for inmates. Prisoners are reportedly dying due to the heat, and some are resorting to drinking toilet water or lying on concrete floors to try to cool off. This situation is causing unrest among guards and corrections officers, leading to increased violence and difficulties in recruitment and retention. The cost of updating these facilities is immense, but the human rights of those incarcerated are often overlooked in budget decisions. It's important to acknowledge that people in prison are still human beings deserving of basic human dignity, especially during extreme weather conditions. This issue underscores the need for systemic change rather than relying on individual acts of charity. The grim reality of the situation should not be ignored, and it's crucial for the public to be informed and advocate for improvements in prison conditions.

    • Acts of kindness towards day laborersSmall acts of kindness towards day laborers can make a significant difference in their lives, providing joy, relaxation, and challenging negative stereotypes.

      Kindness and generosity can make a significant difference in people's lives, especially for those who rarely get a chance to experience joy and relaxation. The story of a 27-year-old man who takes day laborers to Disneyland or gives them a day off with his own resources is a heartwarming reminder of the importance of treating everyone with dignity and respect. He saw the pure joy on people's faces and realized that many of them had never taken a day off work. The man's initiative not only provides a much-needed break but also challenges the negative stereotypes often portrayed in media about low-wage workers. His actions are not exploitative but rather an act of kindness, and he even has brand partnerships to help cover his expenses while using donations to fund the outings. Overall, this story highlights the power of small acts of kindness and the importance of recognizing the humanity and worth of all individuals.

    • Experiencing joy from others' creationsBuilding for others can bring joy, as seen in a construction worker visiting Disneyland and Boeing's Starliner finally launching into orbit.

      Sometimes, the people who build amazing things for others get to experience the joy of those creations in their own lives. A construction worker who helped build Disneyland gets to bring his family to the park, despite not having been able to visit as a guest during its creation. Meanwhile, a space technology failure was rectified when Boeing's Starliner finally launched into orbit, marking progress towards leaving Earth. These stories remind us that the satisfaction of seeing others enjoy the fruits of our labor, and the progress towards achieving ambitious goals, can bring great joy.

    • This Is Uncomfortable book clubJoining the This Is Uncomfortable book club provides access to thought-provoking reads, author interviews, and a chance to win merchandise, broadening your horizons on money, class, and work.

      Joining the This Is Uncomfortable summer book club is an excellent opportunity to discover thought-provoking reads that challenge your perspectives on money, class, and work. Every fortnight, you'll receive a book recommendation in their newsletter, accompanied by an interview with the author or an expert on the topic. By signing up, you'll also be entered into a giveaway for a chance to win This Is Uncomfortable merchandise. Overall, this book club offers a unique and engaging way to expand your knowledge and broaden your horizons on these important subjects. So, don't miss out and sign up today at marketplace.org/bookclub.

    Recent Episodes from Make Me Smart

    The long road to restore the Port of Baltimore

    The long road to restore the Port of Baltimore

    The main channel into the Port of Baltimore is expected to reopen soon, but the city is still dealing with the aftermath of the collapse of Francis Scott Key Bridge in late March. Guest host Amy Scott explains how the port’s closure has affected global supply chains, shipping container costs and life in Baltimore. Plus, a shake-up at the Federal Election Commission is making certain gray areas of campaign finance even grayer. Then, we’ll celebrate the first transgender and Asian American woman to be crowned Miss Maryland USA.

    Here’s everything we talked about today:

    We love to hear from you. Send your questions and comments to makemesmart@marketplace.org or leave us a voicemail at 508-U-B-SMART.

    Make Me Smart
    enJune 10, 2024

    Less is not always more in economic data

    Less is not always more in economic data

    It’s Friday, folks! Today we’re talking about some news coming from former President Donald Trump, who has vowed to take away key spending powers from Congress if reelected. We’ll get into what that would mean in practice. Plus, we’ll talk through the latest from the Bureau of Labor Statistics, which just announced it’ll be decreasing the number of households surveyed for important reports like the monthly jobs report. It’s a move that will make decoding what’s going on in our economy more a little more challenging. Plus, we’ll get into Bazooka gum, the rise of Uncrustables and Forever Stamps getting more expensive during a round of Half Full/Half Empty.

    Here’s everything we talked about today:

    We love to hear from you. Send your questions and comments to makemesmart@marketplace.org or leave us a voicemail at 508-U-B-SMART.

    Make Me Smart
    enJune 08, 2024

    Why the Fed won’t hop on the rate-cutting bandwagon just yet

    Why the Fed won’t hop on the rate-cutting bandwagon just yet

    The European Central Bank is joining Canada in cutting interest rates after months and months of holding them steady. But the U.S. Federal Reserve isn’t likely to follow suit, at least not yet. We’ll explain why. Then, we’ll dig deeper into the political and financial motivations for New York Gov. Kathy Hochul’s abrupt decision to block congestion pricing in New York City. Plus, what antitrust investigations into Nvidia, Microsoft and OpenAI could mean for AI mania.

    Here’s everything we talked about today:

    Join us tomorrow for Economics on Tap! The YouTube livestream starts at 3:30 p.m. Pacific time, 6:30 p.m. Eastern. We’ll have news, drinks, and play a round of Half Full/Half Empty!

    Make Me Smart
    enJune 06, 2024

    What summer heat waves mean for prisons

    What summer heat waves mean for prisons

    Triple-digit heat waves are spreading across the Southwest, and many incarcerated people have to endure the extreme weather without air conditioning. We’ll get into why state legislatures have been slow to address the problem and why it’ll only get worse as temperatures rise. Plus, we’ll get into New York Governor Kathy Hochul’s last minute switch-up on congestion pricing. And, the story of a TikTok influencer treating day laborers to days off at Disneyland is making us smile.

    Here’s everything we talked about today:

    We love to hear from you. Send your questions and comments to makemesmart@marketplace.org or leave us a voicemail at 508-U-B-SMART.

    Make Me Smart
    enJune 05, 2024

    The good, the bad and the ugly of election polling

    The good, the bad and the ugly of election polling

    With the 2024 election only five months away, polls abound. But since 2016, polls have had somewhat of a bad rap, and many Americans have become skeptical of their reliability.

    David Dutwin, senior vice president of strategic initiatives at NORC at the University of Chicago, said we’re thinking about polls all wrong. On the show today, Dutwin explains what polls can and can’t tell us, how to spot a high-quality poll and what kind of role polling should play in our understanding of elections. Plus, what’s keeping pollsters up at night.

    Then, we’ll talk about how the Joe Biden administration is addressing an issue that’s top of mind, according to a new Gallup survey: immigration. And, a Half Full/Half Empty update on the job market.

    Later, one listener’s small-scale solution to the Big Food problem, and a divisive grammar debate. Plus, a listener was wrong about the meaning of “vibecession.”

    Here’s everything we talked about today:

    We love to hear from you. Send your questions and comments to makemesmart@marketplace.org or leave us a voicemail at 508-U-B-SMART.

    Make Me Smart
    enJune 05, 2024

    A shadow looms over the Fed

    A shadow looms over the Fed

    The results of a new Bloomberg poll indicate that the markets suspect a second Trump presidency would put the Federal Reserve’s independence in jeopardy. We’ll get into what the former president’s advisors have said about his plans for the central bank. And, Republicans are gearing up to challenge upcoming election results while Democrats prepare to counter those lawsuits. Plus, why we want to be Simone Biles when we grow up.

    Here’s everything we talked about today:

    We love to hear from you. Send your questions and comments to makemesmart@marketplace.org or leave us a voicemail at 508-U-B-SMART.

    Make Me Smart
    enJune 03, 2024

    The long game of high interest rates

    The long game of high interest rates

    The latest data from the Federal Reserve’s favorite inflation measure hinted that inflation is cooling. But the Fed is still on guard, meaning higher interest rates for longer than many had expected. We’ll get into how that will likely be felt differently by Americans at opposite ends of the income spectrum. Then, we’ll get into the risky return of zero-down mortgages. Plus, we’ll weigh in on Chevy Malibus and merch during a round of Half Full/Half Empty!

    Here’s everything we talked about today:

    We love to hear from you. Send your questions and comments to makemesmart@marketplace.org or leave us a voicemail at 508-U-B-SMART.

    Make Me Smart
    enJune 01, 2024

    The growing troubles at OpenAI

    The growing troubles at OpenAI

    A former OpenAI board member dropped a bombshell allegation about CEO Sam Altman and the company’s ethics. But this isn’t the first time employees have expressed safety concerns about the company. We’ll explain. Plus, a new rule aims to protect buy now, pay later users. And, how college sports might finally get recognized as a multibillion-dollar business.

    Here’s everything we talked about today:

    Join us tomorrow for Economics on Tap! The YouTube livestream starts at 3:30 p.m. Pacific time, 6:30 p.m. Eastern. We’ll have news, drinks and play a round of Half Full/Half Empty.

    Make Me Smart
    enMay 30, 2024

    A Trump-Musk bromance

    A Trump-Musk bromance

    After years of having a frosty relationship, Elon Musk and Donald Trump are warming up to each other. We’ll discuss what a potential political marriage might mean for a second Trump administration. Plus, who actually donates to political campaigns? Later, we’ll smile about two giant pandas returning to D.C.’s National Zoo!

    Here’s everything we talked about today:

    We love to hear from you. Send your questions and comments to makemesmart@marketplace.org or leave us a voicemail at 508-U-B-SMART.

    Make Me Smart
    enMay 29, 2024

    How Big Food changed the way we eat

    How Big Food changed the way we eat

    Today we’re talking about food. Specifically, Big Food. In his book, “Barons: Money, Power, and the Corruption of America’s Food Industry,” Austin Frerick, agricultural and antitrust policy fellow at Yale, argues the food system is the most consolidated sector in the United States. On the show today, Frerick explains how the American food system became so concentrated, how that’s inflated prices and eroded quality, and what we should do about it. Plus, Walmart’s role as king of grocery kings.

    Then, we’ll get into why Boeing can’t keep up with SpaceX. And, an expert on youth mental health (and former guest on “Make Me Smart”) was wrong about how teens curate their social media feeds.

    Here’s everything else we talked about today:

    We love to hear from you. Send your questions and comments to makemesmart@marketplace.org or leave us a voicemail at 508-U-B-SMART.

    Make Me Smart
    enMay 29, 2024