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    This Is How the Food Industry Is Preparing For a Post-Ozempic World

    enJune 10, 2024

    Podcast Summary

    • Flavor innovation in food and beverage industryThe food and beverage industry is responding to consumer demand and competition by using technology and AI to create new and sophisticated flavors, driven by the impact of GLP-1 fueled diets on consumer preferences.

      The world of business and consumer culture continues to evolve, with two major trends emerging: the impact of GLP-1 fueled diets on consumer industries, particularly food and beverage companies, and the need for companies to innovate and offer more creative and interesting flavors to keep up with consumer demand and competition. The BMW i7 represents this trend in innovation and luxury, with its automatic doors, and curved display, while the snack food industry is responding with the use of technology and AI to create new and sophisticated flavors. Barb Stuckey, the Chief Innovation and Marketing Officer at Matson, a Silicon Valley based food and beverage innovation company, will join the show to discuss the science of great flavors and the current moment in flavor history. American Express Business Gold Card also offers benefits to help businesses maximize value and grow.

    • GLP-1 drugs impact on food preferencesGLP-1 drugs, which slow down gastric emptying, lead to increased satisfaction and food preference shift towards lighter options like fruits and vegetables.

      GLP-1 drugs, which are used for weight loss and diabetes management, are gaining popularity and having a significant impact on people's relationship with food and beverages. A chief innovation officer in the food industry, who conducted research on this topic, shared that the vast majority of the 75 patients in their consumer panel reported being extremely satisfied with their experience on these drugs, despite experiencing side effects like constipation or diarrhea. These drugs work by slowing down gastric emptying, making people feel full longer and preventing overeating. The study also revealed that people on these drugs were shifting their food preferences towards lighter options like fruits and vegetables, and away from heavy, high-calorie foods like beef and sugary sodas. This change in food preferences is a promising finding for the food industry, as it could lead to new product development and innovation in the healthier direction.

    • Food Industry DisruptionA new weight loss drug is causing people to crave healthier options, potentially disrupting the food industry with the need for smaller portion sizes, reduced sodium, and nutrient-dense ingredients.

      A new weight loss drug is changing people's food cravings and caloric intake in significant ways. People are turning away from high-calorie, salty snacks and opting for healthier options, such as crisp cucumbers. This shift has the potential to disrupt the food industry, as manufacturers may need to adapt by creating smaller portion sizes, reducing sodium, or adding nutrient-dense ingredients to their products. The research also showed that people wanted delicious and interesting food, even if they were consuming less of it. The top-scoring food concepts included a protein-packed, bite-sized brownie and other small, indulgent treats. It's important to note that these findings could have a major impact on the food industry and the way we approach healthy eating.

    • Familiar foods with innovative twistsConsumers prefer foods with familiar flavors but innovative twists when following a weight loss regimen. Successful examples include grilled chicken strips and clear protein beverages in lighter, refreshing flavors. New food products can come from creating entirely new, upcycled ingredients or reinventing existing favorites with healthier options and clean label ingredients.

      Consumers prefer familiar foods with innovative twists when following a weight loss regimen. The discussion highlighted the success of grilled chicken strips, individually packaged and convenient for portion control, as well as clear protein beverages in lighter, refreshing flavors like cucumber. The evolution of new food products can come from creating entirely new, upcycled ingredients, like roasted and ground date seeds as a coffee replacement, or reinventing existing favorites with healthier options and clean label ingredients. Consumers are more likely to embrace change when it's a familiar concept with an innovative twist. The process of creating a new food product involves a combination of novel ideas and improvements on existing products. For instance, Atomo's roast and ground coffee replacement using date seeds is a novel idea, while reinventing favorite snacks with cleaner ingredients is a common trend. Flavors that stand the test of time, such as cool ranch and chili lime, possess complexity and layers, providing a rich and satisfying taste experience.

    • Viral Food TrendsUnderstanding the combination of basic tastes, texture, aroma, and slight twists on familiar flavors are essential for creating viral food trends. Responding quickly to trends is crucial for small businesses and those with in-house manufacturing, while larger companies may take longer to develop and launch new products.

      The complexity and layering of flavors are key elements in creating interesting and viral food trends. Human beings can experience five basic tastes: sweet, sour, bitter, salt, and umami. But texture and aroma also play significant roles. For instance, ranch dressing is salty and savory, while buttermilk adds sourness and creaminess. Chili lime seasoning, on the other hand, combines salt, chili's texture, and sourness from lime, along with aromas from the chilies and lime. The phenomenon of viral food trends can be attributed to both innovative flavors and slight twists on familiar ones. For example, the feta pasta trend took off during the pandemic when people were looking for new recipes, and the ease and novelty of baking an entire block of feta cheese made it popular. Companies can respond quickly to viral trends if they are small and nimble or if they own their manufacturing lines. However, for larger consumer packaged goods companies, it could take anywhere from 6 months to a year and a half to develop and launch a new product.

    • Food TrendsStay informed about food trends, protect intellectual property, focus on marketing, taste, distribution, and pricing, and look for inspiration from Southeast Asian tropical flavors and Korean food for healthier options.

      Staying informed and attentive to emerging trends, whether it's through high-end restaurants, social media platforms like TikTok, or consumer research, is crucial for identifying the next big thing in the food industry. Belgian Boys' success with pancake cereal serves as a prime example of how quickly ideas can spread and be transformed into marketable products. However, it's important to note that intellectual property protection can be challenging in the food world, making it essential to build a strong brand and focus on marketing, taste, distribution, and pricing. Tropical flavors, particularly those from Southeast Asia, are currently gaining popularity, and companies are looking to Korean food for inspiration. Consumers are increasingly seeking healthier options, so innovation may come from preparation, packaging, portion size, and alternative ingredients.

    • GLP-1 drugs impact on food industryThe food industry may need to adapt to the growing population of people taking GLP-1 drugs by offering individually portioned and healthier options, potentially leading to new opportunities for food packaging and a shift in food production.

      The food industry may need to adapt to the growing population of people taking GLP-1 drugs by offering individually portioned and healthier options. This could lead to new opportunities for food packaging and potentially a shift in the types of foods produced and sold. The utilitarian approach to food may become more prevalent, with an emphasis on convenience and portion control. Additionally, there may be challenges for companies that rely heavily on unhealthy, high-calorie foods, as the demand for these products could decrease. Overall, the food industry will need to find ways to cater to the changing needs and preferences of the GLP-1 drug-taking population while still maintaining profitability.

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