Logo
    Search

    Our immigration identity crisis

    enJune 04, 2024

    Podcast Summary

    • Immigration concernsImmigration is a major concern for Americans, with record-high illegal border crossings leading to calls for an effective system to manage it, while maintaining a positive view towards legal immigration

      During the discussion on Celebrity Memoir Book Club, the topic of immigration was prominently featured in the conversation surrounding the former U.S. President Donald Trump's statements after his felony conviction. Trump, who has been making immigration a major focus of his campaign, expressed concerns about millions of people entering the country from various parts of the world. On the other hand, President Biden's approach to immigration has evolved due to the increasing number of illegal border crossings, which has reached a record high of 2 million per year. According to Gallup's director of U.S. social research, Lydia Saad, immigration was the most frequently mentioned problem by Americans in April 2023. However, despite the concerns about illegal immigration, most Americans view immigration as a good thing and want an effective system to manage it. Americans are seeking a functional immigration system that allows those who can contribute positively to the country to enter, while keeping out those who pose a threat. This shift in perspective from the 1990s, when immigration was less popular, highlights the evolving attitudes towards immigration in the U.S.

    • US Immigration Policy ShiftsThe political stance towards US immigration has shifted from enforcement in the 1990s to economic recognition among Democrats today, but comprehensive reform efforts have failed and the legal system is backlogged due to Trump's hardline stance and COVID-19 disruptions

      The political stance towards immigration in the United States has significantly shifted over the past few decades. In the 1990s, there was a focus on enforcing immigration laws and reducing illegal immigration, following a period of widespread concern over the issue. Fast forward to today, and there is a growing recognition among Democrats that immigration can be beneficial for the economy. However, the history of immigration policy in the US is complex, with numerous attempts at reform since the 1990s failing to pass. The Trump administration's hardline stance on immigration, which included increased enforcement and extreme vetting, created significant backlogs in the legal immigration system. The COVID-19 pandemic further disrupted immigration, both legally and illegally, but it also highlighted the importance of immigration to the US economy and the need for a more comprehensive and humane approach to the issue. Ultimately, the US remains a nation of immigrants, but the challenges of managing immigration in a fair, efficient, and compassionate way continue to be a source of debate and controversy.

    • Identity vs BordersThe US struggles to balance its identity as a nation that values immigration with managing its borders, resulting in a deeply polarized immigration debate between Democrats and Republicans, with both sides advocating for different solutions.

      The immigration debate in the United States has become deeply polarized between Democrats and Republicans, with each side advocating for different solutions. The Trump administration's emphasis on increased scrutiny of all immigrants, rather than a focus on legal versus illegal immigration, set a precedent that the Biden administration has since adopted in some ways. However, the US cannot control the world and prevent people from fleeing their home countries or seeking better opportunities. The Biden administration has tried to increase alternate legal pathways and make it harder for people to present themselves at the border to apply for asylum. The persistent belief that the solution is to stop people from coming has limited the solution space, and the US grapples with its identity as a nation that values immigration but struggles to manage its borders.

    • NetSuite and Indeed solutionsNetSuite is a popular cloud financial system used by over 37,000 companies, offering cost savings through eliminating hardware needs. Indeed simplifies job searching by matching employers with potential candidates without extensive searching.

      Both NetSuite and Indeed offer solutions to simplify processes in different areas. NetSuite, a top-rated cloud financial system, promises cost savings by eliminating the need for hardware and reducing the number of companies using it to over 37,000. Indeed, on the other hand, offers a unique approach to job searching by matching employers with potential candidates without the need for extensive searching. Mark Krekorian, the executive director of the Center For Immigration Studies, discussed potential reductions in legal immigration if given unlimited power, suggesting a significant decrease while maintaining a few exceptions. In the real world, he emphasized the importance of regaining control over immigration before discussing legal changes. The Biden administration's border policies have led to over 6.3 million migrant encounters since 2021, with nearly 2.4 million let in and eligible for work permits. To stop releasing people and detain them, resources from the Department of Defense might be required, which could involve substantial costs.

    • Immigration Enforcement PoliciesDuring the first term of a presidency, enforcement of immigration laws, including deportations and reducing the illegal population significantly, should be prioritized. In the second term, remaining illegal aliens could be legalized in exchange for substantial reductions in legal immigration.

      Effective enforcement of immigration laws is politically sustainable in the United States, according to Mark Krikorian, the Executive Director of the Center for Immigration Studies. Krikorian believes that during the first term of a presidency, enforcement should be the priority, including deportations and reducing the illegal population significantly. In the second term, he proposes legalizing remaining illegal aliens in exchange for substantial reductions in legal immigration. Despite the controversial nature of these policies, Krikorian argues that Americans are concerned about immigration as the biggest issue facing the country and would support such an approach. He believes that Trump is the closest contender to address this issue, despite his divisive rhetoric. Americans have shown they don't want to see kids in cages or open borders, and they understand that entering the country illegally doesn't grant automatic residency. Krikorian emphasizes the importance of enforcing immigration laws and believes it is a mature and necessary approach to making policy.

    • Asylum policiesThe Justice Department is reversing Trump-era asylum policies, prioritizing genuine refugees, and denying entry to those without legitimate reasons

      The Justice Department has announced it will be reversing several restrictive asylum policies set during the Trump administration. These policies denied asylum to individuals fleeing from gang violence. The U.S. does not offer asylum to those who are not genuine refugees. With a global population of over 7 billion people, not everyone can move to the United States. The country has the authority to decide who can enter. Genuine asylum seekers will be prioritized. Those who use asylum as a means to enter the U.S. without legitimate reason will not be allowed. Mark Krikorian from the Center for Immigration Studies further emphasizes this perspective. Tomorrow, we will hear from Denver Mayor Mike Johnston, who faces an immigration crisis in his city and holds opposing views on immigration. Our show was produced by Hadi Muwagdi, edited by Matthew Collette, fact-checked by Laura Bullard, mixed by Patrick Boyd, and Andrea Christensdottir. Today, it's explained.

    Recent Episodes from Today, Explained

    Was that antisemitic?

    Was that antisemitic?
    Since October 7 there has been a lot of debate over what is and isn’t antisemitic. Rabbi Jill Jacobs and Harvard law professor Noah Feldman explain why the definition is so important. This episode was produced by Avishay Artsy, edited by Amina Al-Sadi, fact-checked by Laura Bullard, engineered by Patrick Boyd and Andrea Kristinsdottir, and hosted by Noel King. Transcript at vox.com/today-explained-podcast Support Today, Explained by becoming a Vox Member today: http://www.vox.com/members Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices
    Today, Explained
    enJune 11, 2024

    Tiktalk therapy

    Tiktalk therapy
    Some therapists are turning to TikTok as a way to make more money and avoid burnout, but is a nightly scroll through therapy content enough to help solve our mental health crisis? This episode was produced by Denise Guerra, edited by Amina Al-Sadi, fact-checked by Laura Bullard, engineered by Patrick Boyd and Andrea Kristinsdottir, and hosted by Jonquilyn Hill. Transcript at vox.com/today-explained-podcast Support Today, Explained by becoming a Vox Member today: http://www.vox.com/members Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices
    Today, Explained
    enJune 10, 2024

    The last good day on the internet

    The last good day on the internet
    Remember when the only thing anybody could talk about was white and gold versus blue and black? NatGeo’s Brian Resnick does. And the Atlantic’s Charlie Warzel explains why there might never be another The Dress. This episode was produced by Amanda Lewellyn, edited by Amina Al-Sadi, fact-checked by Laura Bullard, engineered by Rob Byers and Andrea Kristinsdottir, and hosted by Noel King. Transcript at vox.com/today-explained-podcast Support Today, Explained by becoming a Vox Member today: http://www.vox.com/members Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices
    Today, Explained
    enJune 07, 2024

    A win for democracy in India

    A win for democracy in India
    India's prime minister suffered a humiliating win this week. Vox's Zack Beauchamp explains a shocking election. This episode was produced by Peter Balonon-Rosen, edited by Miranda Kennedy, fact-checked by Laura Bullard, engineered by David Herman and Andrea Kristinsdottir, and hosted by Noel King. Transcript at vox.com/today-explained-podcast Support Today, Explained by becoming a Vox Member today: http://www.vox.com/members Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices
    Today, Explained
    enJune 06, 2024

    Immigration lemonade

    Immigration lemonade
    When it comes to immigration solutions, the federal government is handing out lemons. Denver Mayor Mike Johnston is making lemonade. This episode was produced by Hady Mawajdeh, edited by Matt Collette, fact-checked by Laura Bullard, engineered by David Herman and Andrea Kristinsdottir, and hosted by Sean Rameswaram. Transcript at vox.com/today-explained-podcast Support Today, Explained by becoming a Vox Member today: http://www.vox.com/members Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices
    Today, Explained
    enJune 05, 2024

    Our immigration identity crisis

    Our immigration identity crisis
    Americans hold contradictory views on immigration: They’re more supportive of it than ever before, while also calling it the nation’s most divisive political issue. A pollster, a policy researcher, and a pundit help make sense of our stalled immigration debate. This episode was produced by Hady Mawajdeh, edited by Matt Collette, fact-checked by Laura Bullard, engineered by Patrick Boyd and Andrea Kristinsdottir, and hosted by Sean Rameswaram. Transcript at vox.com/today-explained-podcast Support Today, Explained by becoming a Vox Member today: http://www.vox.com/members Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices
    Today, Explained
    enJune 04, 2024

    The backlash to America’s racial reckoning

    The backlash to America’s racial reckoning
    The murder of George Floyd and the protests that followed looked like a turning point in the fight against systemic racism. Except, as Vox’s Fabiola Cineas explains, it wasn’t. This episode was produced by Victoria Chamberlin, edited by Amina Al-Sadi, fact-checked by Laura Bullard, engineered by David Herman and Andrea Kristinsdottir, and hosted by Sean Rameswaram. Transcript at vox.com/today-explained-podcast Support Today, Explained by becoming a Vox Member today: http://www.vox.com/members Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices
    Today, Explained
    enJune 03, 2024

    Florida man convicted

    Florida man convicted
    Former President Donald Trump is now also convicted felon Donald Trump. It didn’t have to be this way. New York magazine’s Andrew Rice explains. This show was produced by Hady Mawajdeh and Haleema Shah with help from Avishay Artsy, edited by Miranda Kennedy, fact-checked by Laura Bullard and Amina al-Sadi, engineered by Patrick Boyd and Andrea Kristinsdottir and hosted by Sean Rameswaram. Transcript at vox.com/today-explained-podcast Support Today, Explained by becoming a Vox Member today: http://www.vox.com/members Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices
    Today, Explained
    enMay 31, 2024

    Can Mexico’s first woman president fix Mexico?

    Can Mexico’s first woman president fix Mexico?
    The AP’s Megan Janetsky and Falko Ernst of the International Crisis Group explain how Mexico’s first woman president will inherit and address the cartel problem that plagued her predecessors. This episode was produced by Denise Guerra, edited by Matt Collette, fact-checked by Laura Bullard, engineered by David Herman and Andrea Kristinsdottir, and hosted by Sean Rameswaram. Transcript at vox.com/today-explained-podcast Support Today, Explained by becoming a Vox Member today: http://www.vox.com/members Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices
    Today, Explained
    enMay 30, 2024

    Chasing the storm

    Chasing the storm
    Aaron Rigsby has built a career out of documenting tornadoes, hurricanes, and other extreme weather up close. So he’s seen just how much more extreme those storms are becoming. This episode was produced by Avishay Artsy, edited by Amina Al-Sadi, fact-checked by Laura Bullard, engineered by David Herman and Andrea Kristinsdottir, and hosted by David Pierce. Transcript at vox.com/today-explained-podcast Support Today, Explained by becoming a Vox Member today: http://www.vox.com/members Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices
    Today, Explained
    enMay 29, 2024