Logo
    Search

    How To Fight Farage

    enJune 04, 2024

    Podcast Summary

    • Mint Mobile price drop, Environmental solutionsMint Mobile drops price to $15/month for new customers using reverse auction method, while experts discuss environmental solutions on Planet Hope podcast.

      Mint Mobile, a wireless service provider, is offering a discounted price of $15 a month for new customers for a limited time. Meanwhile, in a separate context, the podcast "Planet Hope" from The Times discusses the efforts of experts from around the world to find solutions to protect the environment. In the same podcast, there's a discussion about creating a new rendition of the "How to Win Election" theme tune, with some participants suggesting inviting Elton John to perform. In the first part of the discussion, Ryan Reynolds from Mint Mobile shares how the company is reducing its prices amid inflation. He brought in a reverse auctioneer to help set the price, which resulted in an offer of $15 a month for unlimited wireless service for new customers. In the second part, the podcast "Planet Hope" explores various solutions to protect the environment, featuring interviews with experts from different fields. The hosts also share a creative rendition of the "How to Win Election" theme tune in the style of The Smiths, with some participants suggesting inviting Elton John to perform.

    • Conservative Party's Election DynamicsThe unexpected entry of Nigel Farage and Reform UK into the UK election scene could lead to a significant loss of votes for the Conservative Party, potentially resulting in a larger defeat for them. Labour needs to remain focused on its target voters and avoid getting distracted by Reform UK's agenda and issues.

      The unexpected entry of Nigel Farage and Reform UK into the UK election scene has significantly changed the dynamics of the race. This development, which was a surprise to many, could lead to a significant loss of votes for the Conservative Party and potentially result in a larger defeat for them. Reform UK's appeal to disgruntled conservative voters could split the right-wing vote, making it a challenge for the Conservatives to win the election. Additionally, the aging demographic of Conservative voters, with a large number of them being undecided, adds to the party's woes. Labour, on the other hand, needs to remain focused on its target voters and avoid getting distracted by Reform UK's agenda and issues. The Conservative Party's response to this development could lead to further chaos and potentially even a leadership change. Overall, this unexpected turn of events could lead to a calamitous outcome for the Conservatives and a net gain for Labour.

    • Labour government policiesUnderstanding Labour's policies and intentions is crucial for the UK, rather than getting bogged down in partisan attacks. The upcoming TV debates offer an opportunity to interrogate parties' positions on various issues, including immigration, defense, security, and the economy.

      As the UK prepares for a Labour government with a large majority, it's crucial to focus on understanding the policies and intentions of the incoming administration rather than getting bogged down in partisan attacks. Nigel Farage, the Brexit Party leader, has attempted to define the election as an "immigration election," but the Conservatives risk losing focus on their strongest areas if they continue to react to Farage's agenda. The Labour Party, if elected, must offer a clear and achievable program for change to win over voters. The upcoming TV debates will be an essential opportunity for voters to interrogate the parties' positions on various issues, including immigration, defense, security, and the economy. The relationship between the Conservative Party and populist figures like Farage is also a significant storyline to watch. Ultimately, the focus should be on the substance of the parties' policies and their ability to deliver on their promises.

    • British politics, Labour Party policiesThe Labour Party's internal conflicts should not overshadow the need to focus on their proposed policies, as the media's focus on sensational stories detracts from meaningful discussions about how the party plans to address defense spending, immigration, and other important issues if they win the election.

      The political landscape is shifting, and it's important to focus on the substance of policies rather than the drama surrounding individual figures. The podcast "Your History" discusses the lives of notable individuals from The Times' obituaries, and hosts Matt Ciardi, Peter Madison, Polly Mackenzie, and Daniel Finkelstein reflect on the current state of British politics. They argue that while there has been a lot of attention on internal conflicts within the Labour Party, it's crucial to focus on what the party is proposing to do if they win the election. The Labour Party's past tolerance of hard-left factions is contrasted with the current ruthless approach of Keir Starmer and Morgan McSweeney. The media's focus on sensational stories, like the removal of Faiza Shaheen from the NEC, detracts from meaningful discussions about policy. The Labour Party's lack of clear answers on specific policies, such as defense spending and immigration, highlights the need for more in-depth interviews and analysis. Overall, the conversation emphasizes the importance of examining the substance of political parties' proposals rather than getting bogged down in internal drama.

    • Political Campaigns, Immigration, NHSPoliticians face challenges committing to concrete policies during election campaigns due to complex political issues and media dominance. Understanding internal conflicts within parties, like Labour's stance on NHS and immigration, is crucial for public scrutiny and gaining a mandate.

      The complexity of political issues and the dominance of political reporting in media make it challenging for politicians to commit to concrete policies during election campaigns. Immigration, for instance, is a policy area where record high numbers were seen due to specific welcoming policies, but the numbers are decreasing as students return home. However, having complex discussions about policies like the NHS is essential, but the current media landscape and public engagement make it difficult. Wayne Streeting's NHS plans may lead to internal clashes within the Labour Party, and understanding Diane Abbott's stance can provide insights into this potential conflict. In the meantime, politicians need a mandate from the public, which can only be gained through rigorous questioning and scrutiny during election campaigns.

    • Media distractions during electionsMedia focus on distractions and controversies during elections can divert attention from important national policies, but parties have already developed their policies before the election period.

      The political landscape, particularly during an election period, can be filled with distractions and controversies that may not hold the same level of importance to the public as more substantial issues, such as national policies. The Diane Abbott story, for instance, while interesting, was not more important to the public than the future of the National Service. The media tends to focus on these stories, creating a "snakes and ladders" effect that can distract from the core issues. The pre-election period, or Purdah, can make it more challenging for parties to announce policies, but this doesn't necessarily mean they are making them up on the spot. In fact, most policies are already well thought out before they are announced. The debate between Keir Starmer and Rishi Sunak, for example, will be crucial in determining who has the better grasp of the issues and the ability to lead as a prime minister.

    • Political GracePoliticians from both parties should focus on being prime ministerial and putting the country first, rather than exuding petulance or resentment.

      Both Rishi Sunak and Keir Starmer would benefit from focusing on being prime ministerial and putting the future of the country first, rather than exuding petulance or resentment. The Tory campaign's message seems to be that the Tories may not be perfect, but Labour would be worse. Meanwhile, Labour's strategy includes highlighting the Tories' imperfections while emphasizing their own potential reforms. It's important for politicians to remember the great privilege of serving as prime minister and to find a way to be graceful and prime ministerial, even in challenging political situations. This advice applies to both parties and could help improve the tone of the political debate.

    Recent Episodes from How To Win An Election

    How To Oppose A Supermajority

    How To Oppose A Supermajority

    As ministers admit on the airwaves that a Conservative victory looks unlikely, how will a small Tory rump in Parliament oppose a new Labour government?


    The political masterminds Peter Mandelson, Polly Mackenzie and Daniel Finkelstein join Matt to look back at what happened in the aftermath of the 1997 Labour landslide, and to consider which way the Conservative Party will turn next. We've also had our first piece of fan art, and launched a colouring competition.


    Send questions, comments and voicenotes to howtowin@thetimes.co.uk, or WhatsApp 0333 00 323 53 with the words 'How To Win'.



    Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.


    How To Win An Election
    enJune 18, 2024

    How Sunak Should Take The Gloves Off

    How Sunak Should Take The Gloves Off

    With Reform UK now ahead of the Conservatives according to one poll, how should Rishi Sunak respond?


    The political masterminds Peter Mandelson and Daniel Finkelstein think the prime minister could electrify the campaign by tackling Nigel Farage head on.


    They join Matt Chorley to talk about whether the polls could still shift before July 4, and whether Keir Starmer really should start measuring the curtains for 10 Downing Street.


    Send questions, comments and voicenotes to howtowin@thetimes.co.uk, or WhatsApp 0333 00 323 53 with the words 'How To Win'.



    Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.


    How To Win An Election
    enJune 14, 2024

    How Trump Will Win

    How Trump Will Win

    We've got a special guest on the podcast this week, with American pollster and strategist Frank Luntz joining Peter Mandelson, Polly Mackenzie, Daniel Finkelstein and Matt Chorley to discuss why Joe Biden is in trouble in the race against Donald Trump, and why the Tories are facing a Canadian-style wipeout.


    Was it wise for Rishi Sunak to head to a racetrack to launch the Conservative manifesto, and are any of the parties being honest about the economy?


    Send questions, comments and voicenotes to howtowin@thetimes.co.uk, or WhatsApp 0333 00 323 53 with the words 'How To Win'.



    Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.


    How To Win An Election
    enJune 11, 2024

    Q&A: How To Get D-Day Wrong

    Q&A: How To Get D-Day Wrong

    The podcast is going twice-weekly for the rest of the campaign, with the political masterminds answering your questions.


    First up today, how did Rishi Sunak get it so wrong when he decided to leave the D-Day ceremony in France early? Can being a good constituency MP save you from defeat? And what's the point of canvassing?


    Send questions, comments and voicenotes to howtowin@thetimes.co.uk, or WhatsApp 0333 00 323 53 with the words 'How To Win'. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.



    Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.


    How To Win An Election
    enJune 07, 2024

    How To Fight Farage

    How To Fight Farage

    How will Nigel Farage's decision to stand as a candidate for Reform UK affect the election result, and can things get any worse for Rishi Sunak?


    The political masterminds Peter Mandelson, Polly Mackenzie and Daniel Finkelstein join Matt Chorley to discuss the chances of a Conservative implosion, Peter's last-ditch plan to replace Sunak with Penny Mordaunt, and whether the TV debates could still shift the dial.


    We also hear a new version of the theme music, sung in the style of The Smiths.


    Send questions, comments and voicenotes to howtowin@thetimes.co.uk, or WhatsApp 0333 00 323 53 with the words 'How To Win'.



    Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.


    How To Win An Election
    enJune 04, 2024

    How To Dodge A Dodgy Candidate

    How To Dodge A Dodgy Candidate

    The race is on to get candidates in place for the general election, with the Tories having to deal with more MPs announcing their departure by the day.


    The political masterminds Peter Mandelson, Polly Mackenzie and Daniel Finkelstein join Matt Chorley to discuss who the parties will pick, and who they’ll come to regret.


    And has Rishi Sunak’s campaign actually started better than we’d expected?


    Send questions, comments and voicenotes to howtowin@thetimes.co.uk, or WhatsApp 0333 00 323 53 with the words 'How To Win'.



    Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.


    EMERGENCY EPISODE: How To Call An Election!

    EMERGENCY EPISODE: How To Call An Election!

    It's happened. Rishi Sunak has announced the General Election for 4th July - as predicted by Danny in the last episode of the podcast.


    The political masterminds Peter Mandelson, Polly Mackenzie and Daniel Finkelstein join Matt for an emergency episode, recorded at the Podcast Show in London.


    Send questions, comments and voicenotes to howtowin@thetimes.co.uk, or WhatsApp 0333 00 323 53 with the words 'How To Win'.





    Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.


    How To Pull Off A Political Stunt

    How To Pull Off A Political Stunt

    The long election campaign is well underway, and politicians are vying for attention with eye-catching photocalls, speeches, visits and stunts.


    The political masterminds Peter Mandelson, Polly Mackenzie and Daniel Finkelstein explain what happened when Blair and Brown shared an ice cream, when Ming Campbell pointed down the toilet, and when Danny was asked to arrange an actual bonfire of regulations.


    And why does Danny think the chances of a summer election may be rising?


    Send questions, comments and voicenotes to howtowin@thetimes.co.uk, or WhatsApp 0333 00 323 53 with the words 'How To Win'.





    Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.


    How To Tell When The Game's Up

    How To Tell When The Game's Up

    Is there a point in an election campaign when you realise that the game is up and you're going to lose? And can you admit it when it happens?


    The political masterminds Peter Mandelson, Polly Mackenzie and Daniel Finkelstein join Matt Chorley to discuss whether Rishi Sunak has another roll of the dice, why Polly planned for a coalition that never happened, and when Peter, Tony Blair and Gordon Brown knew they had no chance of beating the Tories.


    Send questions, comments and voicenotes to howtowin@thetimes.co.uk, or WhatsApp 0333 00 323 53 with the words 'How To Win'.



    Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.


    How To Leave A Legacy

    How To Leave A Legacy

    What is Rishi Sunak's political legacy, and has he still got time to build one? The political masterminds discuss when leaders have left a lasting change - and whether they can ever leave the public wanting more.


    Peter Mandelson, Polly Mackenzie and Daniel Finkelstein join Matt Chorley to talk about legacy, why Rachel Reeves is using the word 'gaslighting', and why Peter thinks the Green Party is becoming a 'dustbin' for the hard left.


    Send questions, comments and voicenotes to howtowin@thetimes.co.uk, or WhatsApp 0333 00 323 53 with the words 'How To Win'.




    Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.