Logo
    Search

    European Elections: EU Commission chief insists "the centre is holding"

    enJune 10, 2024

    Podcast Summary

    • European elections impactEuropean elections led to uncertainty and instability, with center right parties strengthening in some countries and far right triumphing in others. President Macron's call for snap elections in France led to economic volatility. Eastern Europe saw mixed results with Hungary's ruling party suffering and Poland's pro-EU prime minister winning.

      The European elections resulted in a swing to the right, with center right parties strengthening their majority in some countries, while the far right triumphed in others. This has led to uncertainty and instability, particularly in France where President Macron called for snap parliamentary elections after his party was trounced by the populist anti-immigrant National Rally. This decision has had a significant impact on the country's economy, with the euro dropping in value against the dollar and falls on French markets. The outcome also comes with great responsibility for the parties in the center to hold the line against the extremes on the left and right. In Eastern Europe, Hungary's ruling party led by Viktor Orban had its worst result in decades, Bulgaria saw an abysmally low turnout for all parties, and the pro-EU prime minister of Poland, Donald Tusk, managed to beat a populist anti-immigrant party. Overall, the elections highlight the challenges facing Europe as it navigates political and economic uncertainty.

    • European elections challengesUnexpected losses for prominent European leaders, including Viktor Orban in Hungary and potential instability in Bulgaria, contrasted with Poland's successful election and Israel's political turmoil

      The European Parliament elections brought unexpected challenges for some prominent European leaders. In Hungary, Viktor Orban, who positions himself as a right-wing ally in Europe, faced a significant loss as a former Fidesz insider, Peter Madya, gained an astonishing 30% of the votes with his newly formed party. This result weakens Orban's influence in Europe and puts him in a precarious position at home. Meanwhile, in Bulgaria, the constant political instability and low voter turnout reflect the people's frustration with their politicians' inability to form a functional government. In contrast, Poland's pro-European Union prime minister Donald Tusk's Civic Coalition had a successful election, marking a win for the center-right and potentially stabilizing the European political landscape. Additionally, former Israeli Defense Minister Benny Gantz's resignation from the war cabinet adds to the political turmoil in Israel, potentially leaving the way for more extremist elements to gain influence.

    • Israel-Hamas Ceasefire, ISIS LawsuitThe US Secretary of State is working on a ceasefire between Israel and Hamas, while survivors of ISIS atrocities sue the widow of its leader for justice.

      The US Secretary of State, Antony Blinken, is currently in the Middle East attempting to broker a ceasefire between Hamas and Israel. The Israeli government has expressed reluctance but may accept the plan to avoid a government collapse. Meanwhile, the widow of Islamic State leader Abu Bakr al Baghdadi is being sued by survivors of the terrorist group's atrocities, including the enslavement of thousands of Yazidis. Su'ad, a survivor, is seeking justice for herself and her missing family members. The discussion also touched upon the safety concerns in the Nigerian film industry, Nollywood, following the tragic death of actor Junior Pope.

    • Film industry safety regulationsThe Nigerian film industry, specifically Nollywood, needs to prioritize safety regulations and protocols due to the lack of registered boats, unlicensed drivers, and insufficient life jackets, resulting in tragic accidents. An additional safety regulatory body is being proposed to oversee production sets.

      The film industry, particularly in Nigeria's Nollywood, needs to prioritize safety regulations and protocols following a tragic boat accident that claimed the life of actor Junior Pope and four others. The incident highlighted the lack of safety measures, including unregistered boats, unlicensed drivers, and insufficient life jackets. Actress Ruth Cadbury, who had experienced a similar accident, called for the establishment of an additional safety regulatory body to oversee production sets. The Actors Guild of Nigeria has responded by setting up a special committee to improve safety guidelines. The incident serves as a wake-up call for the industry, which is the third largest in the world, to prioritize safety and prevent future tragedies.

    • Lonely deaths in JapanJapan faces complex issues with aging population and isolation leading to 'lonely deaths' and unclaimed bodies, causing shame and concern, while UK scientists develop fluorescent dyes to aid in cancer surgery and Venezuelan prisoners protest human rights abuses and poor jail conditions

      In societies like Japan, which are experiencing an aging population and increasing isolation, there are complex issues emerging, such as "lonely deaths" or unclaimed bodies. Local authorities are struggling to cope with this issue, as they are responsible for dealing with unclaimed bodies and trying to locate relatives. This process can be costly and time-consuming, and there is a growing sense of shame and concern within society about this issue. Meanwhile, in the field of healthcare, scientists in the UK are making strides in using fluorescent dyes to help identify and remove cancerous prostate cells during surgery that are invisible to the naked eye. This technology could potentially reduce the chance of the disease returning and minimize damage to healthy tissue. Lastly, in Venezuela, prisoners are protesting against alleged human rights abuses and poor conditions in overcrowded jails, with many staging hunger strikes due to delays in processing their release orders. These protests come ahead of next month's elections.

    • Malaysia, South Africa social issuesGovernments addressing criminal activities and saving money in Malaysia, while artists advocate for LGBTQ+ rights and visibility in South Africa

      Both Malaysia and South Africa are dealing with significant issues within their societies. In Malaysia, the government is cracking down on criminal gangs in prisons and ending a diesel subsidy to reduce smuggling and save money. In South Africa, there is progress in the constitution with the legalization of gay marriage and protection against discrimination, but hate crimes against the LGBTQ+ community remain common. South African photographer Zanele Muholi, who identifies as non-binary, is using art to challenge discrimination and document the lives of queer and trans people in South Africa. Despite these challenges, Muholi remains committed to fighting for the visibility and respect of the black LGBTQIA+ community. In Malaysia, the government's actions aim to address smuggling and save money, while in South Africa, artists like Muholi continue to push for visibility and respect for marginalized communities.

    • EU Elections Shift RightYoung voters in some EU countries, particularly France and Germany, are backing radical right parties due to economic concerns and cultural issues. Education plays a role in voting patterns.

      The EU elections have seen a shift to the right, with young voters in some countries, particularly France and Germany, backing radical right parties in significant numbers. This trend is driven by a desire for change and a sense of grievance about everyday issues like cost of living and unemployment, as well as cultural concerns around immigration and societal change. The radical right's successful use of populist rhetoric to address these concerns has resonated with young voters. However, this trend is not uniform across Europe, as young voters in Italy are more likely to vote for left-wing parties. Education also plays a role, with higher educated individuals being less likely to vote for radical right parties. The rise of populist radical right parties is not limited to Northern Europe but is a uniform trend across Europe, with even Southern European countries seeing an increase in their power.

    Recent Episodes from Global News Podcast

    Iranian rapper's death sentence overturned

    Iranian rapper's death sentence overturned

    The Supreme Court has ordered a retrial for Toomaj Salehi who was sentenced to death after speaking out in support of protests that had exploded across Iran. Also: the new documentary about the designer of the wrap dress, Diane von Furstenberg, and the world's ugliest dog.

    Global News Podcast
    enJune 23, 2024

    The Happy Pod: Knitted together by an unloved sweater

    The Happy Pod: Knitted together by an unloved sweater

    When Celia's daughter asked about regrets, she posted a message about a puffin sweater she wished she'd bought. Just days later, a man she'd never met sent her the exact same one for free - saying it felt so good to be kind. Also: The earthquakes being caused by enthusiastic fans during Taylor Swift's Eras Tour. A BBC radio programme reaches 46 people celebrating mid winter in Antarctica. How artificial intelligence could help us understand what dogs are trying to say. Why a sculptor decided to create dozens of art galleries and museums around the world - underwater. And the festival celebrating the enduring traditions of Flamenco dancing - and bringing it into the twenty first century.

    Our weekly collection of happy news and positive stories from around the world.

    Global News Podcast
    enJune 22, 2024

    Kenyan police accused of excessive force in anti-tax demos

    Kenyan police accused of excessive force in anti-tax demos

    Lobby groups say at least 200 people were injured and more than 100 arrested across Kenya. Protesters say the controversial finance bill that includes additional taxes would choke the economy and raise the cost of living. Also: parts of southern China have once in a century flooding, while the north is hit by extreme temperatures and drought, how wild chimpanzees seek out medicinal plants, and Stonehenge marks the summer solstice - the longest period of daylight in the northern hemisphere.

    Global News Podcast
    enJune 21, 2024

    US says it is working hard to avoid conflict with China

    US says it is working hard to avoid conflict with China

    The US ambassador to China tells the BBC that despite a competitive relationship, the two countries are now talking more regularly to prevent escalation in the disputed South China Sea. Also on the podcast: India's government is accused of failing the education system after cancelling an exam taken by nearly a million people, a look back on the life of Canadian film star, Donald Sutherland, and the Spanish feline that looks to be saved from extinction.

    Global News Podcast
    enJune 21, 2024

    New clashes in Kenya over planned tax rises

    New clashes in Kenya over planned tax rises

    Demonstrators, many of them young, were armed only with their smart phones. Police in Nairobi came on horseback and used water cannon. The Kenyan government plans to raise more than two-and-a-half billion dollars in new taxes. Also: a day after signing a defence agreement with North Korea, Russia's President Putin visits Vietnam, the new treatment that leaves heart attack victims more active than they were, and the British musician Rapman on his Netflix show about superheroes in London.

    Global News Podcast
    enJune 20, 2024

    Putin and Kim sign new defence pact

    Putin and Kim sign new defence pact

    Accord signed on Vladimir Putin's first visit to Pyongyang in more than twenty years. Kim Jong-un said he unconditionally supported Russia's military action in Ukraine. Mr Putin said he appreciated North Korea's unwavering support. Also: Cyril Ramaphosa is sworn in for a second term as President of South Africa, Nvidia becomes the world's most valuable company, and the flower that stinks of rotting meat.

    Global News Podcast
    enJune 19, 2024