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    • The Benefits and Importance of Self-Compassion for Effective ParentingPracticing self-compassion can lead to being a happier, more effective, and resilient parent. It is vital to be supportive and kind to oneself to attain a positive outlook and an advantageous edge.

      Self-compassion is supported by compelling research as a helpful attitude. Those who practice it tend to be happier, more effective, and resilient. Carla Naumberg, a clinical social worker, mother, and author, explains self-compassion in plain English and with humor. Even though some skeptics may find self-compassion practices schmoopy, it is still a vital element to retain an edge. Naumberg aims to assist parents, especially the self-critical ones who think they suck, to stop losing their shit with their kids. Practicing self-compassion can be helpful in being a better parent. It is essential to have a supportive inner attitude and be kind to oneself.

    • Overcoming Shitty Human Syndrome with Empathy and SupportInstead of categorizing people as "shitty," it's better to address their flaws and provide necessary resources for improvement. Terrible actions should be criticized, not individuals themselves. Remember that Shitty Human Syndrome is not universal and attempt to recognize different cultural experiences.

      Shitty Human Syndrome is a belief that we are fundamentally terrible people; however, it is important to acknowledge that we are not. Rather than labeling others as 'shitty,' it is better to consider what resources and support they need to overcome their flaws. This encourages empathy and helps create meaningful conversations on how we can help others. Shitty Human Syndrome is common among upper-middle-class white Americans with too much time and money on their hands. However, this belief is not universal, and people from different cultures and backgrounds may not experience it. It is better to focus on terrible actions rather than labeling people as evil or terrible.

    • The epidemic of self-hatredFeeling inadequate because of society's standards is dangerous and worsened by being privileged. Spending too much time on social media and in one's own mind can lead to harmful narratives.

      Self-hatred is a prevalent issue where individuals feel terrible about not meeting society's standards in different areas of life like beauty, financial gain, professional achievement, productivity, and much more. It is not just limited to feeling like a bad human, but it can also stem from the inability to get their act together in different facets of life. Spending too much time on social media and in their own brains are also significant contributors to this epidemic, exacerbated in privileged countries where people have the luxury of thinking without constant physical labor. The narratives one creates in their minds can be dangerous, often leading to unhelpful places.

    • The Harmful Effects of Comparing Ourselves to OthersInstead of individual competition and comparison, prioritize relationships and pursuing happiness as a collective team. Be mindful of emotions and support each other during challenging times.

      Comparing ourselves to others, especially those with unlimited resources and access, can lead to unrealistic expectations and self-criticism. Western societies have been focused on individualism and happiness, which can be harmful when we face difficult situations. Instead of focusing on individual competition and comparison, we should prioritize relationships and pursuing happiness as a collective team. This applies to all, regardless of race or income. We should be mindful of our emotions and how they work, especially during challenging times such as the pandemic. It is important to recognize that life is hard and we should not put pressure on ourselves to always be happy, but rather support and uplift each other.

    • Self-Compassion: A Practical Approach to Dealing with DifficultyNotice our struggles, treat ourselves kindly and ask what we need. Self-compassion empowers us to deal with life's challenges and respond better in all areas.

      Self-compassion is about noticing when we're suffering or struggling and treating ourselves with kindness and acceptance. We tend to brush past our struggles and distract ourselves but the first step is to notice that we're struggling. The second step is to treat ourselves the way we would treat a good friend or loved one. It's important to ask ourselves 'what do I need right now?' instead of beating ourselves up. Self-compassion is not a weak or self-indulgent concept but a practical and helpful approach to dealing with difficult moments. Self-awareness and kindness towards oneself can lead to a better response to struggles and challenges in all areas of life.

    • The Importance of Self-Compassion for Behavioral Change.Practicing self-compassion can lead to a calmer and kinder self, which can ultimately lead to a better personal and professional life. It is essential to test it out oneself and understand the connection between self-compassion and behavior changes.

      Self-compassion can lead to significant behavioral changes in an individual, and it is important to make a clear connection between self-compassion practice and how it can make one's life, personal and professional, easier and better. Research and evidence-based approaches are important, but it is equally important to test it out within oneself. For someone like the speaker, who is a pragmatist and a type A person, data and evidence were powerful incentives to try out self-compassion. Understanding the connection between self-compassion and calmer behavior led her to delve into it further. The speaker learned that what is inside will come out, and self-compassion practice can help individuals be kinder and more patient with themselves and ultimately others.

    • Avoiding Unnecessary Suffering by Managing the Second Arrow of LifeLife's second arrow of shame and blame often causes unnecessary suffering. By focusing on managing our response to it, rather than denying or distracting ourselves, we can avoid long-term negative effects.

      Life inevitably throws first arrows at us, but it is up to us how we respond to the second arrow of suffering which is the arrow of shame and blame. Self-help books mostly focus on avoiding the first arrow of life, but we need to learn how to manage the second arrow. Third arrows of denial and distraction also exist and it is easy to get caught up in them. We end up spending too much time on second and third arrows and never learn how to take care of ourselves in the wake of the first arrows. Realizing this and choosing a different response to the second arrow can help us avoid unnecessary suffering.

    • The importance of practicing self-compassion to deal with difficult feelings.Practicing self-compassion helps us understand and accept our pain, instead of fighting it or berating ourselves. It's a human thing that helps us notice our experience, understand what's going on, and be kind to ourselves.

      We weren't taught how to deal with our feelings. Self-compassion helps us feel calmer and gain clarity. Practicing self-compassion helps us notice our experience, understand what's going on and be kind to ourselves. It's not just a Dan thing, it's a human thing. Our society teaches us to suck it up and get over our pain, which is why many of us struggle with being with difficult feelings. Most adults don't even know the difference between a feeling, a thought, and a behavior. Being self-compassionate can help us understand and accept our pain instead of fighting it or berating ourselves.

    • The Power of Self-CompassionPracticing self-compassion can improve well-being, creativity, and relationships. It involves being kind to oneself during moments of distress and acknowledging mistakes as a natural part of being human. With practice, it becomes a valuable tool for resilience.

      Practicing self-compassion leads to feeling calmer, clearer, more creative, confident, and connected. Self-compassion is a skill that can be developed through practice, just like learning a new language or playing an instrument. It involves being present and kind to yourself, especially in moments of distress. Self-compassion helps free up brain space to come up with creative solutions and be more available for other human connections. It also involves acknowledging mistakes as a natural part of being human instead of berating oneself. Practicing self-compassion may feel awkward and difficult at first, but it's an essential tool for improving overall well-being and resilience.

    • The Practice of Self-Compassion: Importance and BenefitsBy noticing our self-talk and practicing self-compassion through positive self-talk, curiosity instead of judgment, and connecting with others who offer kindness, acceptance, and forgiveness, we can improve our relationship with ourselves and others while reducing negative self-talk.

      Self-compassion involves noticing how you treat yourself, connecting with those who offer kindness, acceptance and forgiveness, practicing curiosity instead of judgment, and being kind to yourself through positive self-talk. Though it may feel awkward at first, the practice of self-compassion can create meaningful change and reduce negative self-talk. Curiosity is the key to combating judgment, and can be used to address what's happening, what you need, and how you can help yourself. Practicing connection and kindness to oneself is essential to one's self-worth and can dramatically improve overall happiness and well-being. By adopting a new language of self-compassion, we can learn to treat ourselves with kindness and acceptance, ultimately improving our relationship with ourselves and others.

    • The Power of Self-Compassion in All Areas of LifeBy practicing self-compassion through kindness, mindfulness, and self-care, we can develop habits that lead to a more positive mindset. Engaging in practices like loving kindness meditation and coordinating positive phrases with physical movement can prepare us to handle challenging situations with ease and kindness.

      Self-compassion is the one thing that can change our lives in all departments, including our relationships and work. Practicing constant kindness, mindfulness, and self-care throughout the day can help us develop native habits. This can include practices like a loving kindness meditation, which can be done both on and off the cushion. For instance, walking around the lake and coordinating phrases like happy, healthy, safe, live with ease with our steps can lead to a more pleasant headspace. These practices enable us to be ready for when life hits us and handle any challenging situations with ease and kindness.

    • The Benefits of Formal Meditation for Daily LifePracticing formal meditation builds neuronal networks for handling difficult moments with kindness and helps counter negative self-talk. Mindfulness training can improve thought management and stress reduction.

      Practicing formal meditation like walking meditation and self-compassion can prepare us to apply it in our day-to-day life more effectively. It helps in building neuronal networks so that we can handle difficult moments with kindness, and it is important to practice it when things are calm so that it becomes available when we need it during critical moments. Kinder self-talk is essential to counter program negative thoughts and language used towards oneself. Our thoughts are just thoughts, and they are not reality, and we don't have to believe everything they say. Mindfulness-based stress reduction course can help in understanding the importance of thoughts and training ourselves to handle them better.

    • The Power of Self-Compassion and Letting Go of Negative Thoughts.We can evaluate our thoughts and replace negative ones, finding what works for us individually. With self-compassion, we can be mindful of our needs and actions towards others, choosing what is best for our overall well-being.

      Our thoughts are not always accurate or helpful, and we have the power to notice them, evaluate their usefulness, and let them go or replace them with something else. Self-compassion involves asking ourselves what we need and answering honestly, while also being mindful of how our actions affect others. It's not about following a specific set of rules or techniques, but finding what works for us individually. Negative thoughts may never go away completely, but we can choose not to believe them and focus on what helps us feel better. Evidence-based practices are important, but ultimately, we have to do what works for us and what is compassionate and caring towards ourselves and others.

    • The importance of setting boundaries and practicing self-care.Set personal rules for boundaries on commitments, prioritize personal time, embrace self-compassion, and experiment with different self-care practices to find what works best for you.

      Self-kindness and self-care are not about self-improvement, but about setting boundaries and accepting them. Practicing mindfulness and acknowledging physical responses can help in dealing with emotions. Setting personal rules for boundaries on commitments can help prioritize personal time. Saying no to commitments can be hard, but it is an opportunity to practice self-compassion and remember that these feelings are human problems, not personal problems. Everyone has different ways of dealing with emotions and practicing self-care, so it is important to experiment with what works best.

    • The benefits of setting boundaries and focusing on one task at a time.Multitasking leads to mistakes and increased stress, while single tasking is an act of self-compassion that increases productivity and reduces stress. Acronyms like SNAFU and KISS help simplify tasks and approach chaos with compassion.

      Setting boundaries and focusing on one task at a time can significantly reduce stress and increase productivity. Multitasking is not an efficient strategy as our brain and body can't handle juggling multiple tasks simultaneously, leading to mistakes, increased stress, and confusion. Single tasking may seem like a common-sense approach to achieving our goals, but it is also an act of self-compassion as it allows us to focus on one thing and do it well, reducing stress and anxiety. Acronyms like SNAFU and KISS can be powerful reminders to help us stay focused, simplify tasks, and approach chaos and confusion with compassion rather than frustration.

    • Small Acts of Self-Compassion and Real Connections Make Parenting EasierPractice self-compassion by being kind to yourself during hard times. Realize that parenting is tough, and perfection does not exist. Connect in-person with other parents and practice mindfulness to avoid worrying about the future and to be present with your children. Community support is crucial in facing the challenges of parenting.

      Practicing self-compassion doesn't have to be a huge, complicated investment and can be started small by noticing how you treat yourself in difficult times and show up with some kindness. The idea that parenting becomes easy and our children will behave if we do everything right is the big lie. The reality is that there are no guarantees in life. To deal with this, real in-person connection with other parents and mindfulness are essential, which helps avoid worrying and anxiety about the future and be present in every moment with the children. Social media rarely offers real support, and in-person connection and community play a significant role in facing the challenges of parenting.

    • The Benefits of Being Mindful and Compassionate While ParentingBy being present and accepting what is, we can cultivate love and make parenting more enjoyable, creating meaningful connections with our children while embracing the fleeting moments of childhood.

      Being present with our kids reduces stress and annoyance, making parenting more enjoyable. Time with our children is fleeting, so we should make the most of it while we can. Mindfulness and compassion are interconnected, as mindfulness involves accepting what is, which can lead to a state of love. For some, accepting something doesn't equate to loving it. However, the definition of love can vary depending on one's perspective. Defining love as anything beyond neutrality can make it easier to give it to our children. Ultimately, being present and mindful while parenting can help us enjoy the time we have with our kids and make the most of every moment.

    • Mindful Parenting: Connecting with Compassion.Mindfulness and compassion can transform parenting by allowing us to connect with our children, handle difficult situations with curiosity and kindness, and empower kids to learn how to handle situations better for the future.

      Choosing the right words to express love or acceptance is subjective, and what matters most is the awareness of our experience. Practicing mindfulness and compassion can help in parenting by showing up with connection, curiosity, and kindness in difficult moments, rather than resorting to yelling or discipline. Discipline without a conversation and natural consequences doesn't help kids learn and develop better behavior for the future. Instead, having a conversation and providing information on how to handle situations differently helps kids learn how to do better.

    • Balancing Effective Discipline and Healthy Communication with ChildrenWhile a sharp tone with minor consequences can be effective, it should not be the dominant dynamic in the relationship. Instead, conversations with children should be prioritized to build healthy communication and discipline habits.

      As parents, it is important to understand that kids like to push limits and see how far they can go. Sometimes using a sharp tone along with a minor consequence can be effective in getting the point across, but it should be used sparingly and not become the dominant dynamic in the relationship. Children should also understand that their behavior has an impact on other people. It's essential to not let such interactions dominate the relationship, leading to spending far too much time yelling at kids. Instead, conversations with kids should be the go-to method. Sometimes using the 'daddy/mommy voice' can help to notice that they are getting ramped up and pissed.

    • Mindfulness for Busy Parents and PartnersPracticing mindfulness can help us be more present, calmer, and less anxious in our daily lives, including our important roles as parents and partners. Recognize responses stem from insecurities, not the issue at hand. Avoid selfish motivations.

      Prioritizing mindfulness practices in our lives should not come at the expense of neglecting our important roles as parents and partners. Meditation can take various forms, and for busy parents, the act of parenting itself can be a meditation in its own right. It is important to recognize that our responses to situations and challenges stem from our own anxieties and insecurities rather than the actual issue at hand. Practicing mindfulness can help us to be more present, calmer and less anxious in our day-to-day lives. Selfish motivations for mindfulness practices can lead to neglecting our important roles and responsibilities and can ultimately make us feel like a lesser person.

    • The Importance of Self-Compassion in Resolving Conflicts and Dealing with MistakesInstead of beating ourselves up, we should acknowledge our mistakes and learn from them. By practicing self-compassion, we can forgive ourselves and move forward without getting tangled up in guilt and self-blame.

      Self-compassion is important in resolving conflicts and dealing with mistakes. Rather than beating ourselves up, we should acknowledge our mistakes and learn from them. Humor can be a helpful coping mechanism, but we should also be careful not to use it as a way to avoid taking responsibility for our actions. It's important to recognize our own needs and limitations, and to respect those of others. Instead of comparing ourselves to others, we should focus on our own journeys and finding what works for us. By practicing self-compassion, we can forgive ourselves and move forward with wise remorse, learning from our mistakes without getting tangled up in guilt and self-blame.

    • The Importance of Humor and Self-Compassion in RelationshipsWhile humor can have positive effects, it's important to be mindful of its impact on others. Incorporating self-compassion into our lives can help us connect genuinely with others. Dan Harris's TED Talk offers insight into this concept authentically.

      Humor can be a double-edged sword. While it can bring laughter and amusement to situations, it can also become a source of unnecessary roughness or distance. It is important to recognize the impact of our humor on others. Additionally, incorporating self-compassion into our lives is crucial. Being kind to ourselves and understanding our emotions can help us connect with others on a deeper level. Dan Harris's TED talk focuses on the importance of self-compassion and it is recommended for anyone who wants to learn more about this topic. Carla Naumburg commends Dan's authentic and real approach to discussing self-compassion, recognizing how it can be an impactful introduction to those unfamiliar with his work.

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    Just Because You Think It, Doesn’t Make It True | Bonus Meditation with Leslie Booker

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    Full Shownotes: https://www.tenpercent.com/tph/podcast-episode/benjamin-perry


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    Arrival | Bonus Meditation with Kaira Jewel Lingo

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    Full Shownotes: https://www.tenpercent.com/tph/podcast-episode/jada

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    RuPaul On: Surviving Your Family, Overcoming Addiction, And How To Have Fun (Including “Dirty Charades”)

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    Other resources mentioned: 


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    Full Shownotes: https://www.tenpercent.com/tph/podcast-episode/rupaul-2024


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    Abby Wambach On: Grief, Addiction, And Moving From External To Internal Validation

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    We caught up with Abby Wambach at a really interesting time. She’s experiencing grief, for reasons we’ll let her explain. And for the first time in her life, she’s grieving while sober—which, in itself, is an interesting story, which she will also tell.

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    Abby Wambach is a two-time Olympic gold medalist, FIFA World Cup Champion, and six-time winner of the U.S. Soccer Athlete of the Year award. She is the author of the #1 New York Times bestseller Wolfpack. And, together with her wife Glennon Doyle and sister Amanda Doyle, co-hosts the award-winning, critically acclaimed We Can Do Hard Things podcast. 

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    Full Shownotes: https://www.tenpercent.com/tph/podcast-episode/abby-wambach

    See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

    Small Wins | Bonus Meditation with Matthew Hepburn

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    About Matthew Hepburn:


    Matthew is a meditation and dharma teacher with more than a decade of teaching experience and a passion for getting real about what it means to live well. He emphasizes humor, technique, and authentic kindness as a means to free the mind up from unnecessary struggle and leave a healthier impact on the world. Beyond Ten Percent Happier, Matthew has taught in prisons, schools, corporate events and continues to teach across North America in Buddhist centers offering intensive silent retreats and dharma for urban daily life. 


    To find this meditation in the Ten Percent Happier app, you can search for “Celebrate Small Wins.”



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    How to Disentangle from Toxic People | Lindsay C. Gibson

    How to Disentangle from Toxic People | Lindsay C. Gibson

    Emotionally immature people can wreck your life. One of our most popular guests returns to teach you how to make sure they don't.


    Description: 

    Our relationships are the most important variable in our health and happiness, but they may also be the most difficult. This is especially true when those closest to us turn out to be emotionally immature people.


    Lindsay C. Gibson is a clinical psychologist and bestselling author who specializes in helping people identify and deal with emotionally immature people, or EIP’s. Her first appearance on our show was one of our most popular episodes of 2022. Now she’s back to offer concrete strategies for handling the EIP’s in your life, wherever you may find them. Her new book is called Disentangling from Emotionally Immature People.


    In this episode we talk about:

    • A primer on the cardinal characteristics of emotionally immature people (EIP’s), how to spot them, and why you might want to
    • What Lindsay means by “disentangling” from EIP’s, and how to do it
    • What often happens to your own sense of self when you’re in relationship (or even just in conversation) with an EIP 
    • How to interact with an EIP 
    • How to prevent brain scramble when you’re talking with someone who isn’t making any attempt to understand what you’re saying  
    • How she reacts when she comes across EIP’s in her everyday life
    • Whether it’s possible to have some immature characteristics without being an EIP
    • Handling your own emotionally immature tendencies  
    • Whether or not EIP’s can change
    • The limits of estrangement
    • Why she encourages “alternatives to forgiveness”


    Full Shownotes: https://www.tenpercent.com/tph/podcast-episode/lindsay-gibson-791


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    Related Episodes

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    • And a specific meditation practice that can help you do it



    Full Shownotes: https://www.tenpercent.com/podcast-episode/sujatha-baliga-565

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