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    • Find hidden talent on LinkedIn70% of LinkedIn users aren't actively looking for jobs, making it a great platform for discovering top talent. Birmingham, UK, has more canal miles than Venice, an unexpected fact that can be a unique selling point.

      LinkedIn is a valuable resource for businesses looking to hire professionals, as over 70% of its users don't visit other leading job sites. This means that great candidates, like Sandra, who might not be actively looking for a new job but could be open to the perfect role, can be found on LinkedIn. Additionally, the podcast discussed a listener's claim that Birmingham, England, has more miles of canals than Venice. While this might seem surprising, the facts show that Birmingham indeed has more miles of canals than Venice, making it a unique selling point for the city. For businesses looking to hire and for those interested in interesting trivia, these insights provide valuable information. Start hiring professionals like a professional by posting your free job on linkedin.com/people today, and don't forget to check out Burrow.com/acast for up to 60% off during their Memorial Day Sale.

    • Venice vs Birmingham: A Debate on Canal LengthsThe debate over Venice and Birmingham's canal lengths is complex due to differing definitions and overlooked canals in Venice.

      The debate over which city has more canals, Venice or Birmingham, is not as clear-cut as it seems. According to the municipal authorities, Venice has approximately 55.84 kilometers of canals within its main city area and three nearby tourist islands, while Birmingham has 35 miles or 56 kilometers. However, Venice's counselor for traditions, Giovanni Giusto, claims there are more canals that have been overlooked. If we include the canal that runs around the perimeter of the city, the total length of canals in Venice would be around 74.49 kilometers. However, not all of these bodies of water can be considered canals in the traditional sense. Inland Waterways International's David Edwards May argues that channels in lagoons cannot be considered true canals because they are not man-made waterways excavated across land. The debate over the definition of canals and the total length of waterways in each city highlights the importance of clarifying definitions and considering context when making comparisons. Ultimately, both cities have significant and unique waterway systems that contribute to their cultural and historical significance.

    • Histories of Birmingham and Basra's Canal SystemsBoth Birmingham and Basra have significant canal systems. Birmingham's canals were man-made for industrial purposes, while Basra's are one of the oldest in the world, naturally formed by the Euphrates and Tigris rivers.

      Both Birmingham and Basra are renowned for their extensive canal systems, each with unique histories. While Birmingham's canals were primarily built for industrial purposes, Basra's network dates back to the 1st century in the Islamic era, making it one of the oldest canal systems in the world. Basra, located in southern Iraq, is famously known as the "Venice of the East" due to its intricate network of over 300 rivers and canals. The city's waterways were not entirely artificial; they were formed by the confluence of the Euphrates and Tigris rivers, which are then channeled into six parallel bodies of water. In contrast, Birmingham's canals were mostly man-made to facilitate transportation and industry. The discussion also highlighted that the Venice in Italy has fewer artificial canals than commonly believed, as many of its waterways were naturally occurring. Overall, the conversation underscored the significance of waterways in shaping the histories and identities of various cities around the world.

    • Disputed Title for City with Most CanalsBirmingham's canal reputation may not be accurate, as Yangzhou, China, holds the record with 127.5 kilometers of canals.

      While Birmingham, England was believed to have more canals than Venice, Italy, this may not be entirely accurate. The original 300 canals in Hamed's hometown of Basra, Iraq, have filled in, leaving only about 30 kilometers worth remaining. However, Yangzhou, China, with its 127.5 kilometers of the Grand Canal, currently holds the title for the city with the most canal length. This discovery was made possible through the historical visit of the famous Venetian explorer Marco Polo to Yangzhou in the 13th century. Despite the numerical dispute, the BBC encourages viewers to send in their thoughts and opinions to the email address moreorless@bbc.co.uk. Furthermore, a cyber criminal group was responsible for a massive $2.1 billion theft from banking systems, using intricate money laundering operations. The Lazarus Heist from the BBC World Service delves into the story of this sophisticated group and their elaborate hacking schemes. Seasons 1 and 2 of this series are available in full.

    • Peace of mind during life transitionsUnitedHealthcare TriTerm Medical Plans offer flexible, budget-friendly coverage for those in between jobs or missed open enrollment, providing access to a nationwide network of doctors and hospitals for nearly 3 years in some states.

      The future may bring many changes, including the possibility of chatbots becoming our new companions. However, there is one constant that won't change – the importance of having health insurance. UnitedHealthcare TriTerm Medical Plans offer flexible, budget-friendly coverage for those in between jobs or who missed open enrollment. These plans last nearly 3 years in some states and provide access to a nationwide network of doctors and hospitals. No matter what tomorrow brings, having UnitedHealthcare TriTerm Medical Plans can provide peace of mind and financial protection. For more information, visit uhone.com.

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    For 20% Off and Free Shipping use code SNG at Manscaped.com

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