Logo
    Search

    What to do with the FBI and the Vietnam War

    enSeptember 23, 2023

    Podcast Summary

    • Allegations of COVID-19 origin and suppressed findingsReports of CIA evidence on lab-origin of COVID-19 being suppressed, emphasizes importance of staying informed and critical of information.

      Prioritizing self-care, whether it's improving your smile with Byte clear aligners or taking care of your home with Thumbtack, can lead to significant improvements in your life. Meanwhile, in the news, there have been allegations regarding the origins of COVID-19 and potential efforts to suppress certain findings, specifically from the CIA. According to a whistleblower, the CIA had evidence suggesting the virus may have originated from a lab, but this information was reportedly suppressed and replaced with the narrative that COVID-19 was of natural origin. This is a developing story and further investigation is needed to determine the validity of these claims. Regardless, it's important to stay informed and critical of the information we receive.

    • Debating the origins of COVID-19 and potential cover-upsSpeaker raises concerns about potential cover-ups, involvement of CIA, CDC, and shifting public health policies by Fauci and Collins, suggesting duplicity and incompetence.

      The origins of COVID-19 and the role of the Wuhan lab in its creation have been subjects of much debate and speculation. The speaker raises concerns about potential cover-ups and the involvement of prestigious institutions like the CIA and the CDC in downplaying the possibility of a lab leak. The speaker also suggests that these organizations may have provided funding to the Wuhan lab to monitor its research, but wanted to keep this involvement hidden. The speaker accuses Anthony Fauci and Francis Collins of being duplicitous and incompetent in their handling of the pandemic, and criticizes them for shifting public health policies. Charles Grassley's call for reforming the FBI rather than defunding it was also discussed. Overall, the speaker expresses a deep distrust of institutions and individuals involved in the pandemic response and their motivations.

    • FBI Reform and Military StrategySenator Grassley and Ramaswami push for FBI reform, preserving investigation power while preventing excessive funding and concentration. A new FBI headquarters is criticized as unnecessary, and military strategy could benefit from more cost-effective and diverse options, like drones, and less expensive aircraft.

      Senator Chuck Grassley and Ramaswami may not have vastly different views on FBI reform. Both advocate for preserving the FBI's ability to investigate, but believe in preventing excessive funding and power concentration within the organization. The recent proposal for a new FBI headquarters is criticized as unnecessary and potentially rewarding those responsible for past controversies. The loss of an F-35 jet serves as a reminder of the need for a more cost-effective and diverse military strategy, potentially involving more drones and fewer expensive aircraft. Lastly, the cancellation of Russell Brandt, despite past controversial behavior, highlights the power of public opinion and the potential consequences of image makeovers.

    • Consequences of crossing ideological linesExpressing opinions that challenge orthodoxy can lead to severe consequences, including public shaming, cancel culture, and false accusations.

      When individuals express opinions that go against the orthodoxy, they can face severe consequences, including public shaming, cancel culture, and even false accusations. This was evident in the case of a public figure who criticized lockdowns, vaccinations, and the woke culture, crossing an ideological line and giving up his "insurance" or protection from criticism. Despite his past personal indiscretions, the real issue was his heterodox views, leading to a scrutiny of his entire life and the unearthing of old accusations. It's essential to be aware of this trend and to differentiate between genuine accusations and those made for ideological reasons.

    • Advantages of Western Military ParadigmThe Western military paradigm, despite not ensuring victory, has provided advantages in logistics, supply, command, and the ability to fight in disadvantageous places, as seen in the Vietnam War.

      The Western military paradigm, with its reliance on superior technology, infantry, constitutional government, and discipline, has given Western armies advantages in logistics, supply, command, and the ability to fight in disadvantageous places. However, this doesn't guarantee victory in every battle, as demonstrated by defeats such as those suffered by the Byzantine and Roman Empires. In the case of the Vietnam War, while there were significant challenges in translating tactical victories into strategic advantages and ending the war, the Western military paradigm still provided advantages that allowed for the eventual defeat of the Vietcong and North Vietnamese. Despite popular portrayals of the Vietnam War as a disaster, the author argues that the Western military paradigm has been influential in shaping military uniforms, weapons, and strategies around the world.

    • The Vietnam War: A Complex ConflictThe Vietnam War was a prolonged conflict shaped by geopolitical considerations, military strategies, and domestic pressures. The war's escalation and eventual defeat led to over 58,000 American casualties.

      The Vietnam War was a complex and protracted conflict shaped by various factors, including geopolitical considerations, military strategies, and domestic pressures. The war was not a conventional battlefield, and the use of certain tactics and weapons was limited due to moral and ethical considerations. The French, who previously held colonial rule in Indochina, were unable to win the war due to financial and military limitations. When the United States became involved, the initial goal was to train the South Vietnamese forces to defend their country and wipe out communist infiltrators. However, the war soon escalated, and the American public became increasingly critical of the war effort. The Kennedy and Johnson administrations made decisions that ultimately weakened the South Vietnamese government and military, leading to the eventual defeat of U.S. forces. The war lasted for over two decades and resulted in the deaths of over 58,000 American soldiers.

    • The Vietnam War: A Complex Conflict with Shifting Alliances and Questionable LeadershipDespite shifting alliances and questionable leadership, the US fought the Vietnam War to prevent the spread of communism, but ultimately ended in a humiliating defeat in 1975

      The Vietnam War was a complex conflict marked by shifting alliances, questionable leadership, and the struggle to avoid a nuclear war. Diem, the South Vietnamese leader, faced opposition within the Kennedy administration, leading to his eventual assassination. After Diem's death, there was a power vacuum and corruption worsened. The situation deteriorated until LBJ took over, but his response to the Tet Offensive led him to decide against running for re-election. Nixon, who took office in a landslide, ended the draft and began a bombing campaign to weaken the North. However, Watergate and the subsequent Senate resolutions cutting off aid to South Vietnam weakened the US position, leading to the North's eventual victory in 1975. This defeat was a humiliation for America, highlighting the complexities and uncertainties of the Vietnam War.

    • The departure of colonial powers didn't lead to peace in Southeast AsiaThe removal of colonial powers from Southeast Asia resulted in devastating conflicts and humanitarian crises, including the rise of Pol Pot in Cambodia and the displacement of over a million Vietnamese people.

      The removal of colonialist powers from Southeast Asia did not lead to the utopia some had hoped for. Instead, it paved the way for devastating conflicts and humanitarian crises. For instance, the departure of the Americans from Vietnam led to the rise of Pol Pot in Cambodia, resulting in the deaths of over a million people. Similarly, when the North Vietnamese arrived in Saigon, they did not extend a hand in reconciliation. Instead, they put over a million people in camps, and hundreds of thousands drowned or fled as boat people. The aftermath of these events left Southeast Asia in turmoil, and the United States did not get involved again until the First Gulf War in 1991. However, it's important to note that interpretations of these events can vary. Some historians argue that American soldiers were effective and disciplined, and that the North Vietnamese and Chinese played significant roles in prolonging the conflict. Regardless, the consequences of these events were tragic and far-reaching.

    • The assassination of South Vietnamese President Diem and its consequencesThe assassination of South Vietnamese President Diem in 1963, orchestrated by the CIA and the US government, led to instability and suspicion towards the US in the eyes of the South Vietnamese people, and serves as a reminder of the unintended and far-reaching consequences of US intervention in foreign politics.

      The assassination of South Vietnamese President Ngo Dinh Diem in 1963, orchestrated by the CIA and the US government, had significant consequences. The myth that Diem was incompetent and corrupt, spread by those who opposed him, was used to justify his removal. However, Diem had more credibility than his successors and his death led to instability and suspicion towards the US in the eyes of the South Vietnamese people. The US attempted to regain control and work better with the South Vietnamese government, but the damage had been done. The assassination is an example of how US intervention in foreign politics can have unintended and far-reaching consequences. The US's actions in Ukraine today may also have unforeseen consequences, and history serves as a reminder of the importance of considering the long-term implications of political decisions.

    • Public support impacts war outcomesThe level of public support can influence the length and success of military conflicts, with minimal support potentially leading to quicker ends and less successful outcomes.

      The public support for wars can significantly impact their outcomes. The Korean War had minimal support towards the end, leading to a rapid decline in deaths, while Vietnam initially had strong support that eventually dwindled, resulting in a long and costly conflict. The term "Vietcong" was a construct used by Northern Vietnam to infiltrate the South and misrepresent peasant support. In contrast, Iraq, though initially considered easier, had more modern infrastructure and was more accessible, making it suitable for air power and troop deployment. The lack of support for the wars in Afghanistan and Iraq eventually led to their end, with varying degrees of success in establishing functional societies. The public's perception and support play a crucial role in the duration and outcomes of military conflicts.

    • Ancient Greek farming community: A place of cooperation and good envyIn ancient Greek farming communities, neighbors played a crucial role in inspiring hard work and fostering a cooperative environment through mutual respect, adherence to rules, and socialization.

      Agriculture is not just a business, but a community where neighbors play a crucial role. This was exemplified in ancient Greece by Hesiod's "Works and Days," which outlined the daily farm tasks and the ideology of farmers. Neighbors were seen as a source of good envy, inspiring farmers to work harder. In the speaker's personal experience, they had a diverse farming community with neighbors of different backgrounds and values. Neighbors followed a hyper-legalistic attitude, ensuring fairness and respecting each other's property. This included lending and borrowing tools, adhering to irrigation allotments, and not hogging the party telephone line. Neighbors were also socialized with, through dinner invitations and visits. Borders were respected, and trespassing was discouraged. While most neighbors followed these rules, there were occasional rule-breakers. Overall, the agricultural community was a place of safety, relaxation, and cooperation.

    • Neighbors' intense competition in farmingFarming involves harsh realities and intense competition, but being adaptable and taking advantage of opportunities can lead to success.

      In this community, competition among neighbors was intense, with some going to great lengths to gain an advantage, even if it meant using each other's resources without permission. However, despite this, the children of these farmers all grew up to be successful, suggesting that the hardships they faced helped them develop resilience and adaptability. An unexpected rain in 1976 wiped out most of the raisin crop, leaving some farmers in a dire financial situation. But one neighbor, who had saved his crop due to his sandy soil, saw the situation as an opportunity to gain a larger share of the market when the price of raisins skyrocketed. This illustrates the harsh realities and the cutthroat nature of farming, but also the importance of being adaptable and taking advantage of opportunities when they arise.

    • From small farms to large corporations: The transformation of agricultureThe loss of small family farms and the rise of large corporate entities has led to a loss of rural culture and equality, making it difficult for individuals to be self-sufficient and connected to the land, resulting in crime and insecurity.

      The agricultural landscape has undergone significant changes over the years, leading to a shift from small family farms to large corporate conglomerates. This transformation, while bringing progress, has also resulted in the destruction of traditional farming communities and the rise of crime and insecurity. The speaker shared a personal experience of how his neighbor, who had once been a successful farmer, lost everything due to poor timing and old age, while he managed to save his crop and eventually prosper. The speaker also emphasized the importance of the words "agriculture" and "agrarian," which respectively mean cultivating the land and advocating for a checkerboard distribution of land ownership. The loss of small family farms and the rise of large corporate entities has led to a loss of rural culture and equality, making it difficult for individuals to be self-sufficient and connected to the land. The speaker lamented the fact that agriculture, which was once a means of creating citizens, has been replaced with progress that does not create citizens but instead leads to crime and insecurity.

    • Understanding Communities: Imperfect but PreferableCommunities, while imperfect, offer better opportunities than many other places. Striving for perfection is not a prerequisite for being good, focus on making the best of what we have and continuously work towards improvement.

      Learning from this discussion with Victor Davis Hanson is that communities, while necessary, are not perfect institutions. It's important to remember that the alternative to being part of a community may not be ideal either. For instance, consider the large number of people trying to enter the Western world from other regions. The left often criticizes, but it's essential to ask what the alternative looks like. No place in Asia, Africa, or even Russia is seeing mass exodus of people wanting to leave. Therefore, it's crucial to understand that communities, despite their imperfections, offer better opportunities than many other places. It's a reminder that striving for perfection is not a prerequisite for being good. Instead, we should focus on making the best of what we have and continuously work towards improving our communities.

    Recent Episodes from The Victor Davis Hanson Show

    Romans Meet Germans and the Brain Drain of Latin America

    Romans Meet Germans and the Brain Drain of Latin America

    Listen in as Victor Davis Hanson and cohost Jack Fowler entertain questions from listeners on the Battle of Teutoburg and the Roman conquest of Germany, its legacy, an analysis of the best militaries of the past, warrior v. soldier, and Latin American professionals and skilled labor leaving their home countries, and the immigration narrative of the left is changing.

    See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

    Unveiling the Deep State: Mark Moyer on "Masters of Corruption"

    Unveiling the Deep State: Mark Moyer on "Masters of Corruption"

    Join Victor Davis Hanson as he interviews esteemed military historian Mark Moyar, the William P. Harris Chair of Military History at Hillsdale College, about his latest book, "Masters of Corruption: How the Federal Bureaucracy Sabotaged the Trump Presidency." Delve into Moyer's firsthand experiences as a political appointee in the Trump administration, his challenges with the deep state, and the intricate workings of the federal bureaucracy. This episode offers a compelling look at the internal resistance faced by the Trump administration and provides insights into the broader implications for future governance.

    See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

    Toxic Males, American Exceptionalism and Papyrus Scrolls

    Toxic Males, American Exceptionalism and Papyrus Scrolls

    In this episode, Victor Davis Hanson and cohost Jack Fowler discuss James Carville's critique of Democratic culture, the feminization of the left, the origins and meaning of American Exceptionalism, teaching the Gospel in ancient Greek, and the Herculaneum papyrus scrolls.

    See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

    Movies, Novels, and the Death of Classics: Listeners' Questions

    Movies, Novels, and the Death of Classics: Listeners' Questions

    Listen in to Victor Davis Hanson and cohost Jack Fowler talk about Shane, Searchers, Lonesome Dove, The Longest Day, Saving Private Ryan, Bridge over the River Kwai and more moviesRobert Grave's I Claudius, Mary Renault's series on Alexander the Great and other novels, and Classics in education.

    See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

    Art, History, and Human Resilience with Sabin Howard

    Art, History, and Human Resilience with Sabin Howard

    In this episode, Victor interviews renowned figurative sculptor Sabin Howard. They delve into Sabin's monumental task of creating the World War I memorial, exploring his artistic process, influences, and the significance of his work. Sabin shares insights into the classical techniques he employs, the cultural importance of figurative art, and his vision for future projects. 

    See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

    The Left in the US and in Britain

    The Left in the US and in Britain

    In this Friday news roundup, Victor Davis Hanson and cohost Sami Winc discuss anti-Trump rhetoric and debate performance, the new SAVE Act, Keir Starmer's cabinet and leftism, Biden interview with Stephanopoulos, Biden taps the long-running Immigration and Nationality Act to deport, Eva Marie Saint at 100, and Ozempic has many applications.

    See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

    Justices, Candidates, and Military Technology

    Justices, Candidates, and Military Technology

    In this episode, Victor Davis Hanson and cohost Jack Fowler discuss the Animal-Farm Democrats, Biden led the attack on Justice Clarence Thomas, the military needs to update its technology, especially drones, the relevance of RFK Jr., elections in England brings in the Labor Party, and lessons from leaders with generous spirits.

    See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

    Immunity, Panic, and Presidential Speeches

    Immunity, Panic, and Presidential Speeches

    Listen in to Victor Davis Hanson and cohost Sami Winc as they discuss the news of the week: SCOTUS rules on presidential immunity, the Biden team in full panic, European elections favor the right parties, US bases in Europe on high alert, Hunter sues Fox News, and Newsom's post-debate speech.

    See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

    Related Episodes

    Ep 36: We Stan a Power Top

    Ep 36: We Stan a Power Top

    *Attention! This episode has discussions of sexual assault and rape. Skip the below timecodes if needed**

    No one paints a head chopping like Artemisia Gentileschi. It's got all you could ever want: blood, horror, drama, and a badass woman empowered by sweet righteous fury. Artemisia is the queen of the Baroque and queen of my heart. Don't take my word for it. Just look at her art. 

    18:23 - 27:47 discussion of sexual assault, rape, and torture

    Check our instagram for more details! https://www.instagram.com/artsistory/

    And email us at artsistory@gmail.com

    Ep 32: What Even is the Venice Biennale?

    Ep 32: What Even is the Venice Biennale?

    It's a spectacle. It's a popularity contest. It's a fun fair. It's a nightmare. Welcome to the 58th Venice Biennale! It's the art olympics where countries compete to be most... something. And Danni is here to sift through the garbage for you! And what has she found? Oh! More garbage! (In the form of the Biennale's Gold Lion winner, Jimmie Durham)

    Check our instagram for more details! https://www.instagram.com/artsistory/

    And email us at artsistory@gmail.com

     

    The History of the Tong Wars Part 2

    The History of the Tong Wars Part 2

    Tom Lee leader of the On Leong TongWelcome to Season 3, Episode 16. The New York Tong Wars were a series of four violent conflicts that happened in New York between the two most influential tongs there… the On Leong Tong and the Hip Sing Tong. In this episode, we talk about the events and environment that led to the Tong Wars, focusing on Tom Lee of the On Leong Tong and how the corruption of law enforcement through Tammany Hall contributed to conflict escalation. We also talk about a few other key Chinese community leaders like Wo Kee, Lee Toy, and Wong Get. For more detailed information on the NY Tong Wars, we highly recommend the Scott Seligman book Tong Wars: The Untold Story of Vice, Money and Murder in New York's Chinatown. In our second segment, we celebrate the recent gold medal for Madison Chock and Evan Bates in Ice Dancing at the recent World Figure Skating Championships, not to mention the 6 medals won by Japanese and Korean skaters. For previous episodes and information, please visit our site at https://asianamericanhistory101.libsyn.com or social media links at http://castpie.com/AAHistory101. If you have any questions, comments or suggestions, email us at info@aahistory101.com.

    Segments

    • 00:25 Getting Caught Up
    • 03:19 The History of the Tong Wars Part 2
    • 20:54 Celebrating Madison Chock, Evan Bates, several Japanese and Korean skaters

    Satelittes

    Satelittes
    fiveofthebest.podomatic.com new episode 12 th march still traveling and having little trouble,  will try to add pics tomorrow     Satelittes           Satellites operate in extreme temperatures from −150 °C (−238 °F) to 150 °C (300 °F) and may be subject to radiation in space. Satellite components that can be exposed to radiation are shielded with aluminium and other radiation-resistant material     Communication satellites range from microsatellites weighing less than 1 kg (2.2 pounds) to large satellites weighing over 6,500 kg (14,000 pounds). Advances in miniaturization and digitalization have substantially increased the capacity of satellites over the years. Early Bird had just one transponder capable of sending just one TV channel. The Boeing 702 series of satellites, in contrast, can have more than 100 transponders, and with the use of digital compression technology each transponder can have up to 16 channels, providing more than 1,600 TV channels through one satellite.     A signal that is bounced off a GEO satellite takes approximately 0.22 second to travel at the speed of light from Earth to the satellite and back. This delay poses some problems for applications such as voice services and mobile telephony. Therefore, most mobile and voice services usually use LEO   Satellites face competition from other media such as fibre optics, cable, and other land-based delivery systems such as microwaves and even power lines. The main advantage of satellites is that they can distribute signals from one point to many locations. As such, satellite technology is ideal for “point-to-multipoint” communications such as broadcasting. Satellite communication does not require massive investments on the ground   The Intelsat spans theToday there are approximately 150 communication satellites in orbit with over 100 in geosynchronous orbit. globe, and domestic satellites such as the USSR's Molniya satellites. Western Union's Westar, and Canada's Anik - serve individual countries. The Intelsat V is the latest in its space-craft series, it can handle 12,000 telephone circuits and two color television transmission simultaneously.     Which of the following whirls around the Earth at 5 miles per second? Hubble Space Telescope. The Hubble Space Telescope is named after Edwin Hubble (1889-1953). Hubble's Law (also named after Edwin Hubble) is a theory that suggests that there is a constantly expanding universe.     Weather Satellites     The first weather satellite was launched on February 17, 1959. What was the name of this satellite? Vanguard 2. Vanguard 2 was designed to measure cloud cover, however, this satellite was poor in collecting data as a poor axis and rotation kept it from collecting meaningful information. TIROS-1 which was launched by NASA in 1960, was the first successful weather satellite and operated for 78 days.   THE MOON     The prevailing hypothesis today is that the Earth–Moon system formed as a result of agiant impact, where a Mars-sized body (named Theia) collided with the newly formed proto-Earth, blasting material into orbit around it that accreted to form the Moon.[20] This hypothesis perhaps best explains the evidence, although not perfectly.   The Moon is drifting away from the Earth:The Moon is moving approximately 3.8 cm away from our planet every year. It is estimated that it will continue to do so for around 50 billion years. By the time that happens, the Moon will be taking around 47 days to orbit the Earth instead of the current 27.3 days.   Evolution of moon  7 min http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TuHasBN-U1c 4 min good video http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aSV98i0jzro   STRANGE SATELLITES   Lapetus moon   Iapetus was discovered by Giovanni Domenico Cassini, an Italian–French astronomer, in October 1671  Cassini correctly surmised that Iapetus has a bright hemisphere and a dark hemisphere, and that it is tidally locked, always keeping the same face towards Saturn. This means that the bright hemisphere is visible from Earth when Iapetus is on the western side of Saturn, and that the dark hemisphere is visible when Iapetus is on the eastern side. The dark hemisphere was later named Cassini Regio in his honour.     A further mystery of Iapetus is the equatorial ridge that runs along the center of Cassini Regio, about 1,300 km long, 20 km wide, 13 km high. It was discovered when the Cassini spacecraft imaged Iapetus on December 31, 2004. Peaks in the ridge rise more than 20 km above the surrounding plains, making them some of the tallest mountains in the Solar System. The ridge forms a complex system including isolated peaks, segments of more than 200 km and sections with three near parallel ridges.[27           MIMAS Mimas is a moon of Saturn which was discovered in 1789 by William Herschel.[8] It is named after Mimas, a son of Gaia in Greek mythology, and is also designated Saturn I. With a diameter of 396 kilometres (246 mi) it is the twentieth-largest moon in the Solar System and is the smallest astronomical body that is known to be rounded in shape because of self-gravitation.     The surface area of Mimas is slightly less than the land area of Spain. The low density of Mimas, 1.15 g/cm³, indicates that it is composed mostly of water ice with only a small amount of rock.   TRITON Triton is unique among all large moons in the Solar System for its retrograde orbit around its planet (i.e., it orbits in a direction opposite to the planet's rotation). Most of the outer irregular moons of Jupiter and Saturn also have retrograde orbits, as do some ofUranus's outer moons. However, these moons are all much more distant from their primaries, and are small in comparison; the largest of them (Phoebe)[f] has only 8% of the diameter (and 0.03% of the mass) of Triton.       HUBBLE SPACE TELESCOPE       Launch: April 24, 1990 from space shuttle Discovery (STS-31) Deployment: April 25, 1990 Mission Duration: Up to 20 years Servicing Mission 1: December 1993 Servicing Mission 2: February 1997 Servicing Mission 3A: December 1999 Servicing Mission 3B: February 2002 Servicing Mission 4: May 2009 Size Length: 43.5 ft (13.2 m)Weight: 24,500 lb (11,110 kg) Maximum Diameter: 14 ft (4.2 m) Cost at Launch $1.5 billion Spaceflight Statistics Orbit: At an altitude of 307 nautical miles (569 km, or 353 miles), inclined 28.5 degrees to the equator (low-Earth orbit)Time to Complete One Orbit: 97 minutes Speed: 17,500 mph (28,000 kph) Optical Capabilities Hubble Can't Observe: The Sun or Mercury, which is too close to the Sun Sensitivity to Light: Ultraviolet through infrared (115—2500 nanometers) First Image: May 20, 1990: Star Cluster NGC 3532 Data Statistics Hubble transmits about 120 gigabytes of science data every week. That's equal to about 3,600 feet (1,097 meters) of books on a shelf. The rapidly growing collection of pictures and data is stored on magneto-optical         disks. Power Needs Energy Source: The Sun Mechanism: Two 25-foot solar panels Power usage: 2,800 watts Pointing Accuracy In order to take images of distant, faint objects, Hubble must be extremely steady and accurate. The telescope is able to lock onto a target without deviating more than 7/1000th of an arcsecond, or about the width of a human hair seen at a distance of 1 mile. Hubble's Mirrors Primary Mirror Diameter: 94.5 in (2.4 m) Primary Mirror Weight: 1,825 lb (828 kg) Secondary Mirror Diameter: 12 in (0.3 m) Secondary Mirror Weight: 27.4 lb (12.3 kg) Power Storage Batteries: 6 nickel-hydrogen (NiH) Storage Capacity: equal to 20 car batteries         International space station   It’s the most expensive object ever built At an estimated cost of $100bn dollars, the ISS is the most expensive single object ever built by mankind. Roughly half of the total price was contributed by the USA, the rest by other nations including Europe, Japan and Russia.   Tracy Caldwell in cupola module