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    What Makes an Entrepreneur Disruptive

    en-GBSeptember 21, 2023

    Podcast Summary

    • Understanding Authenticity in Disruptive EntrepreneurshipIdentify areas for improvement, stay true to yourself, and have the courage to go after them to make a meaningful impact in disruptive entrepreneurship.

      Being authentic means being true to yourself, but understanding what that means can be a challenging question. Disruptive entrepreneurs are individuals who enter established industries with the goal of improving services and creating fair competition. They are not afraid to challenge the status quo and go against the norm. Disruption doesn't always mean being rude or aggressive, but it can be about making changes in one's personal or professional life. The key to being a successful disruptor is identifying areas for improvement and having the courage to go after them. It's important to remember that everyone has the potential to be disruptive in their own way, and it doesn't always require being controversial or polarizing. Instead, focusing on authenticity and staying true to yourself is the key to making a meaningful impact.

    • Be authentic and disruptive in entrepreneurshipEmbrace uncertainty, express yourself authentically, and disrupt your industry to stay competitive

      Being authentic is essential in entrepreneurship, but it's also important to be disruptive and push beyond your comfort zone. Authenticity doesn't mean being boring or inauthentic in a negative way, but rather being true to yourself and creating a brand around your unique qualities. Disruption is necessary to stay competitive and adapt to changing industries, even if it's uncomfortable or scary. Entrepreneurs should embrace the uncertainty and adaptability that comes with disruption, rather than trying to maintain perfection or conformity. Authenticity and disruption are interconnected, and both are crucial for success in entrepreneurship. For example, successful entrepreneurs like Rob were often rebels or nonconformists in their youth, and they continue to express themselves authentically while disrupting their industries as adults. Ultimately, being authentic and disruptive requires a willingness to embrace uncertainty and take calculated risks, even if it means stepping out of your comfort zone.

    • Finding Authenticity Through Self-Reflection and MentorshipReflect on who you are and what you're meant to do, seek guidance from mentors, and have authentic conversations to find your authentic self and act naturally.

      Authenticity comes from within and answering the hard questions about who you are and what you're meant to do in life can help you find it. Authenticity isn't about being obnoxious or overemotional, but rather being true to yourself and saying and doing things naturally, without worrying about judgment. Authentic conversations on controversial topics can lead to valuable insights. Mentorship and guidance from those who have walked the path before can also help you find your way and be authentic in your actions. For example, the speaker was inspired by Warren Borgier, Mark Homer, and John De Martini in his journey to help others through mentoring. Authenticity is about being raw and real, and not holding back out of fear of judgment or trying to make things go viral on social media. It's about having meaningful conversations and being true to yourself.

    • Learning from diverse sources and successful individualsLearn from various sources, build a strong audience, and stay adaptable to disruptive trends for personal growth and business success.

      Learning from diverse sources and successful individuals, regardless of their industry, can provide valuable insights for personal growth and business success. The speakers mentioned their experiences with billionaire mentors and disruptive influencers like the Paul brothers, who have disrupted industries through engaging audiences and building strong personal brands. The importance of having a large, engaged audience was emphasized, as it can lead to business opportunities and partnerships with major corporations. The speakers also discussed the power of podcasts in building loyalty and fan bases, which can contribute to long-term success. With over 1300 episodes between their podcasts, the speakers have been dedicated to sharing insights and knowledge with their audiences for an extended period. Overall, the key takeaway is to learn from various sources, focus on building a strong audience, and stay adaptable to disruptive trends in order to succeed.

    • Most enjoyable interview was with Chrissie Eubanks despite her challenging personalityEmbrace the unexpected and push through challenges to uncover unique and entertaining content.

      The most memorable and enjoyable interviews often come from challenging encounters with disruptive and unconventional individuals. The interviewer, who has met many successful entrepreneurs and personalities, shares that his most enjoyable interview was with Chrissie Eubanks, despite it being the most difficult one. He describes Harry as slippery, obnoxious, and offensive, but also found the experience amazing and entertaining. The interviewer also reveals his watch dealer, who used to be a professional footballer, and invites listeners to check out Broadwalk if they're interested in investing in high-end watches. The interviewer reflects on how he has grown as an interviewer by not shying away from bold questions and standing his ground, even when faced with challenging personalities. He also mentions other notable interviews, such as Andrew Tate, and shares his plans to interview Will.I.Am in the future. Overall, the interviewer emphasizes the importance of embracing the unexpected and the value of pushing through challenges to uncover unique and entertaining content.

    • Importance of Effective Communication and Time Management in InterviewsEffective communication and time management are vital in interviews. Adhere to promises made about interview length, communicate clearly, and know when to conclude the conversation.

      Effective communication and respect for time are crucial in conducting successful interviews. The interviewee, Harry, and the interviewer, discussed their experiences with securing adequate time for interviews and the importance of letting go once the conversation has reached a satisfactory point. They also shared instances where time was not managed well, leading to frustration. The interviewer emphasized the importance of adhering to promises made regarding interview length and the value of clear communication. Additionally, they touched upon the art of knowing when to conclude an interview and allow the interviewee to move on. Overall, the conversation highlighted the significance of respecting time and maintaining effective communication in the interview process.

    • Staying true to your word builds trust and respectAuthenticity and reliability are valuable assets that set individuals apart and build long-term success

      Keeping your word and maintaining integrity are crucial in building and maintaining a strong personal brand. As individuals and businesses grow, it can be easy for standards to slip, but it's essential to take responsibility for the promises made on behalf of oneself or one's brand. Breaking a promise can leave a lasting negative impression and potentially damage relationships. Authenticity and reliability are valuable assets that can set individuals apart in a world filled with empty promises and vacuous rhetoric. By staying true to our word, we build trust and respect, which can lead to long-term success and positive experiences for all parties involved.

    • Sharing Financial Knowledge and Improving Relationships with MoneySuccessful entrepreneur Rob Moore produces financial content through books, interviews, and social media, aiming to address societal issues and keep audiences engaged and learning.

      Rob Moore, the successful entrepreneur and content creator, is deeply passionate about sharing financial knowledge and improving people's relationships with money. He continues to produce money-related content through books, interviews, and social media, aiming to address societal issues surrounding money. Moore has published numerous books, with plans to write at least one a year, and his first was "Property Investing Secrets" in 2008. He is torn between sharing his personal story and focusing on practical, how-to advice, but believes most of his stories can be found throughout his books. Moore's content includes interviews with disruptors, money secrets, and experiments on the streets of Peterborough, all with the goal of keeping his audience engaged and learning.

    • Personal stories add value when paired with expertiseAuthenticity and transparency in sharing expertise and experiences can create a compelling narrative, connecting with readers and providing value.

      When it comes to writing and sharing expertise, personal experience and credibility go hand in hand. Sharing stories adds value and makes the content relatable, but it's also essential to demonstrate expertise and knowledge in the field. In the publishing world, memoirs and autobiographies can be effective, but only if the author has established credibility and a strong personal brand. Being vague or secretive about one's net worth or wealth can raise suspicion and hinder the author's ability to connect with their audience. Instead, weaving personal stories into practical advice and being authentic and transparent about one's expertise and experiences can create a compelling and effective narrative. Ultimately, the focus should be on providing value to the reader, rather than on the author's personal story or net worth.

    • From guarding to sharing business infoFear of failure can lead to guarding business info, but openness and testing new ideas can lead to success and helping others

      Transparency and openness in business have evolved over time for some individuals. The speaker in this conversation shared his personal journey from guarding business information due to fear of failure and scarcity mindset to becoming more open and willing to share information with others. He noted that while some people have copied his business model, not all have achieved the same level of success. The speaker also emphasized the importance of testing and investing in new ideas before sharing them with others to avoid potential loss of goodwill. Ultimately, he expressed a desire to help others along the way, recognizing the statistical likelihood of business failure but also his belief in the possibility of breaking those statistics.

    • Different business partners bring complementary skillsEmbrace challenges as opportunities, have a clear division of labor, and learn from inspiring stories to succeed in business.

      Success in business depends on finding a partner with complementary skills and focusing on areas of expertise. The speaker, Robert, shares how he and his business partner Mark have different strengths, with Robert excelling in strategy, vision, sales, and marketing, while Mark is strong in operations, technical, practical, and analytical aspects. This division of labor has allowed them to endure in business for a long time. However, many entrepreneurs fail due to lack of persistence, moving into unfamiliar areas, or failing to invest in necessary resources. Robert emphasizes the importance of embracing challenges and seeing them as opportunities, rather than evils. He also recommends listening to inspiring stories of individuals like Mark Ormrod, Craig Harrison, and Paul Merson, who have overcome adversity and shared remarkable experiences.

    • Join Chloe's Daily Facebook Live Series 'Coffee with Chloe', subscribe to her YouTube and podcast platformsChloe differentiates her Facebook Live series and podcast under the same brand to provide unique content and experiences to her audience.

      Chloe hosts a daily Facebook Live series called "Coffee with Chloe," which airs every morning at 8 AM. Initially, she planned to create content for this series and a podcast under the same brand. However, they decided to differentiate the two. If you've been following or watching "Coffee with Chloe" on YouTube, don't forget to share your biggest takeaways in the comments. And, if you haven't already, be sure to subscribe and follow Chloe on YouTube and podcast platforms to stay updated on her inspiring guests. Tune in next week for another enlightening episode!

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    VALUABLE RESOURCES

    https://robmoore.com/

    bit.ly/Robsupporter  

    https://robmoore.com/podbooks

     rob.team

    Episode Sponsor - AG1

    Claim your exclusive offer of AG1 at the link below

    drinkag1.com/disruptors

    ABOUT THE HOST

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    CONTACT METHOD

    Rob’s official website: https://robmoore.com/ 

    Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/robmooreprogressive/?ref=br_rs

    LinkedIn: https://uk.linkedin.com/in/robmoore1979

     

    See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

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    Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/robmooreprogressive/?ref=br_rs

    LinkedIn: https://uk.linkedin.com/in/robmoore1979

     

    See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

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    VALUABLE RESOURCES

    https://robmoore.com/

    bit.ly/Robsupporter  

    https://robmoore.com/podbooks

     rob.team

    Episode Sponsor - AG1

    Claim your exclusive offer of AG1 at the link below

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    Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/robmooreprogressive/?ref=br_rs

    LinkedIn: https://uk.linkedin.com/in/robmoore1979

     

    See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

     

     

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    ABOUT THE HOST

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    Rob’s official website: https://robmoore.com/ 

    Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/robmooreprogressive/?ref=br_rs

    LinkedIn: https://uk.linkedin.com/in/robmoore1979

     

    See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

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    Claim your exclusive offer of AG1 at the link below

    drinkag1.com/disruptors

    ABOUT THE HOST

    Rob Moore is an author of 9 business books, 5 UK bestsellers, holds 3 world records for public speaking, entrepreneur, property investor, and property educator. Author of the global bestseller “Life Leverage” Host of UK’s No.1 business podcast “The Disruptive Entrepreneur”

    “If you don't risk anything, you risk everything”

     

    CONTACT METHOD

    Rob’s official website: https://robmoore.com/ 

    Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/robmooreprogressive/?ref=br_rs

    LinkedIn: https://uk.linkedin.com/in/robmoore1979

     

    See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

     

     

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    VALUABLE RESOURCES

    https://robmoore.com/

    bit.ly/Robsupporter  

    https://robmoore.com/podbooks

     rob.team

    Episode Sponsor - AG1

    Claim your exclusive offer of AG1 at the link below

    drinkag1.com/disruptors

    ABOUT THE HOST

    Rob Moore is an author of 9 business books, 5 UK bestsellers, holds 3 world records for public speaking, entrepreneur, property investor, and property educator. Author of the global bestseller “Life Leverage” Host of UK’s No.1 business podcast “The Disruptive Entrepreneur”

    “If you don't risk anything, you risk everything”

     

    CONTACT METHOD

    Rob’s official website: https://robmoore.com/ 

    Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/robmooreprogressive/?ref=br_rs

    LinkedIn: https://uk.linkedin.com/in/robmoore1979

     

    See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

    disruptive, disruptors, entreprenuer, business, social media, marketing, money, growth, scale, scale up, risk, property: http://www.robmoore.com

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    John DeMartini Reveals:

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    • Why death, negativity and evil are necessary parts of a successful life
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    BEST MOMENTS

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    "Depression is a comparison of your current reality to a fantasy you're addicted to. The fantasy is a pleasure without a pain. The depression is a pain without a pleasure. And they're both poles of a magnet to letting you know that you're imbalanced in your perception and you've got a subjective bias in your interpretation of reality."

    "Your values come from your voids. Your voids come from anything that you're too proud or too humble to admit that you see in others inside you."

    "ADHD is a label from pharmaceutical companies to, And from counsellors and psychologists and teachers who aren't aware of how to communicate in kids values. Who are therefore what, just lazy teachers who aren't not intentionally lazy. Or maybe not inspired teachers. They're just not educated. "

     "The real you, authenticity, is seeing both sides simultaneously and embracing them equally."

     "Burnout and boredom are feedback that you're not authentic. They're giving you feedback."

     "Eternal change is constantly changing forms. The master lives in a world where it sees the new forms, dances in the new forms."

     

    VALUABLE RESOURCES

    https://robmoore.com/

    bit.ly/Robsupporter  

    https://robmoore.com/podbooks

     rob.team

    Episode Sponsor - AG1

    Claim your exclusive offer of AG1 at the link below

    drinkag1.com/disruptors

    ABOUT THE HOST

    Rob Moore is an author of 9 business books, 5 UK bestsellers, holds 3 world records for public speaking, entrepreneur, property investor, and property educator. Author of the global bestseller “Life Leverage” Host of UK’s No.1 business podcast “The Disruptive Entrepreneur”

    “If you don't risk anything, you risk everything”

     

    CONTACT METHOD

    Rob’s official website: https://robmoore.com/ 

    Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/robmooreprogressive/?ref=br_rs

    LinkedIn: https://uk.linkedin.com/in/robmoore1979

     

    See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

    disruptive, disruptors, entreprenuer, business, social media, marketing, money, growth, scale, scale up, risk, property: http://www.robmoore.com

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    Nigel Reveals:

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    • The commitment he wants to government to make to its citizens
    • The failure of the NHS
    • Why immigration levels are breaking the UK

    BEST MOMENTS

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    “The banks are stopping you putting money in crypto”

    “The cashless society advanced hugely during the lockdown”

    VALUABLE RESOURCES

    https://robmoore.com/

    bit.ly/Robsupporter  

    https://robmoore.com/podbooks

     rob.team

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    ABOUT THE HOST

    Rob Moore is an author of 9 business books, 5 UK bestsellers, holds 3 world records for public speaking, entrepreneur, property investor, and property educator. Author of the global bestseller “Life Leverage” Host of UK’s No.1 business podcast “The Disruptive Entrepreneur”

    “If you don't risk anything, you risk everything”

     

    CONTACT METHOD

    Rob’s official website: https://robmoore.com/ 

    Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/robmooreprogressive/?ref=br_rs

    LinkedIn: https://uk.linkedin.com/in/robmoore1979

     

    See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

    disruptive, disruptors, entreprenuer, business, social media, marketing, money, growth, scale, scale up, risk, property: http://www.robmoore.com

    Disruptors
    en-GBJune 14, 2024

    Red Carded by the BBC: Mark Lawrenson Talks About Shocking Exit and Life Before and After Football

    Red Carded by the BBC: Mark Lawrenson Talks About Shocking Exit and Life Before and After Football

    Rob is joined by ex-footballer and commentator Mark Lawrenson in this episode. Mark talks about what it was like to work for and then be axed by the BBC, the reasons he believes so many of his fellow presenters were axed and also reveals a shocking story around the Maxwells and Robert Maxwell’s murder. Rob and Mark also discuss why they feel the UK has gone soft, the impact big money and financing has made to football and more incredible stories from his career as a footballer and presenter. 

    Mark Lawrenson Reveals:

    • Why the BBC Sacked him
    • The differences between male and female football
    • Why TV and the country has gone ‘too soft’
    • What it was like to play for Liverpool
    • Why being told he couldn’t play football drove him to his ultimate success
    • The negative impact of big money and finance on football
    • A shocking story surrounding Maxwell's alleged murder by Mossad

     

    BEST MOMENTS

    “Really good [football] commentary makes a huge difference”

    “The country is knackered”

    "Bob Paisley comes down from upstairs, takes him a couple of minutes and everything. Walks in. Complete hush, respect... Where's Alan Kennedy? And one of the lads had gone, 'Oh, he's over here.' So, Bob strolled over and looked at him, and he said, 'Do you know what, Alan? They shot the wrong fucking Kennedy.'" 

    "I'd get slaughtered sometimes, fair enough, doesn't particularly bother me. And then I'd meet somebody and then they say to me, 'Oh you're completely different from what you, when you're commentating,' and I go, 'No I'm not. I'm just the same.'" 

    "One of the problems with the BBC was that they don't really understand things like you've been a footballer and sometimes you get left out. And you get taken off the pitch. And it's as though they can't tell you the bad news." 

    "My biggest disruption was my mum leaving us... We never knew. My mum always said to us, 'You, I'll never tell you what happened, but you would have done the same thing.'"

    "Robert Maxwell owns Derby, Kevin Maxwell owns Oxford... He looked at me and he said, 'What's your problem?' I imagine that, and it just all came out, and I called him every name under the sun. And he looked at me, and he went, 'I quite like you actually.'”

    VALUABLE RESOURCES

    https://robmoore.com/

    bit.ly/Robsupporter  

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     rob.team

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    ABOUT THE HOST

    Rob Moore is an author of 9 business books, 5 UK bestsellers, holds 3 world records for public speaking, entrepreneur, property investor, and property educator. Author of the global bestseller “Life Leverage” Host of UK’s No.1 business podcast “The Disruptive Entrepreneur”

    “If you don't risk anything, you risk everything”

     

    CONTACT METHOD

    Rob’s official website: https://robmoore.com/ 

    Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/robmooreprogressive/?ref=br_rs

    LinkedIn: https://uk.linkedin.com/in/robmoore1979

     

    See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.



    disruptive, disruptors, entreprenuer, business, social media, marketing, money, growth, scale, scale up, risk, property: http://www.robmoore.com

    Disruptors
    en-GBJune 10, 2024

    Rob’s Supercars: Proving the Haters Wrong!

    Rob’s Supercars: Proving the Haters Wrong!

    For the first time ever, Rob is revealing his entire supercar collection. From the fastest to his ultimate favourite, he talks through each car, revealing what he loves and proving to the haters and trolls what he really owns and drives!

    Rob Reveals:

    • The fastest car he owns
    • How many supercars he owns
    • How much he paid for his supercars
    • Why he loves the pursuit of owning supercars

    BEST MOMENTS

    “This kind of car is going to be good for our filming when we go and visit our guests”

    “It’s impossible for me to get all my cars in one place”

    “This car either makes people orgasm, scream with excitement or panic and nearly have a heart attack”

    “It’s not owning the nice things that’s the pleasure, it’s getting and attaining them”

    VALUABLE RESOURCES

    https://robmoore.com/

    bit.ly/Robsupporter  

    https://robmoore.com/podbooks

     rob.team

    Episode Sponsor - AG1

    Claim your exclusive offer of AG1 at the link below

    drinkag1.com/disruptors

    ABOUT THE HOST

    Rob Moore is an author of 9 business books, 5 UK bestsellers, holds 3 world records for public speaking, entrepreneur, property investor, and property educator. Author of the global bestseller “Life Leverage” Host of UK’s No.1 business podcast “The Disruptive Entrepreneur”

    “If you don't risk anything, you risk everything”

     

    CONTACT METHOD

    Rob’s official website: https://robmoore.com/ 

    Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/robmooreprogressive/?ref=br_rs

    LinkedIn: https://uk.linkedin.com/in/robmoore1979

     

    See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

    disruptive, disruptors, entreprenuer, business, social media, marketing, money, growth, scale, scale up, risk, property: http://www.robmoore.com

    Disruptors
    en-GBJune 07, 2024

    Related Episodes

    The Uncomfortable Truth About Social Media

    The Uncomfortable Truth About Social Media

    Hadjer Beyaz interviews Rob on the Diaries of Success for this episode. Rob gives tips and advice on how to navigate the world and business as an entrepreneur, talking about the downsides and the ways you can conquer the challenges. Rob also talks about the negative side of social media right now and how he is doing things differently.

    ROB REVEALS

    • The poor content social media rewards
    • Why he and his brand resonate with so many people
    • The truth about tax for entrepreneurs
    • Why he welcomes haters
    • His scariest moment in business

    ALSO FEATURED:

    • How to surround yourself with the right people and remain positive and focused
    • How to leverage and manage your time effectively

    BEST MOMENTS

    “The Philip Schofield stuff is just a smear campaign on a guy cus they’re going to get views”

    “I believe social media rewards controversy, polarisation, being critical or nasty or vicious towards other people and in short aggressive form”

    “It’s better to speak truthfully, it’s not always easy”

    “I believe if you want to stay of active body you have to stay of active mind”

    “I don’t like to talk about what other people say about me”

    “I might get cancelled, do I give a shit?”

    “We did 16 hour days to make sure we kept the building sites open and the company open [during covid]”

    VALUABLE RESOURCES

    https://robmoore.com/

    bit.ly/Robsupporter  

    https://robmoore.com/podbooks

     rob.team

    ABOUT THE HOST

    Rob Moore is an author of 9 business books, 5 UK bestsellers, holds 3 world records for public speaking, entrepreneur, property investor, and property educator. Author of the global bestseller “Life Leverage” Host of UK’s No.1 business podcast “The Disruptive Entrepreneur”

    “If you don't risk anything, you risk everything”

    CONTACT METHOD

    Rob’s official website: https://robmoore.com/ 

    Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/robmooreprogressive/?ref=br_rs

    LinkedIn: https://uk.linkedin.com/in/robmoore1979

    See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

    disruptive, disruptors, entreprenuer, business, social media, marketing, money, growth, scale, scale up, risk, property: http://www.robmoore.com

    S1E003 Alex Osterwalder on the 3 Characteristics of Invincible Companies and How He Stays Grounded as a Leader

    S1E003 Alex Osterwalder on the 3 Characteristics of Invincible Companies and How He Stays Grounded as a Leader

    In this episode, my guest Alex Osterwalder shares 3 common traits you'd expect to find in an invincible company, the back story of how his book Business Model Generation came about from his PhD thesis, how he stays grounded as a leader and much more.

    You'll need a pen and notepad ready for taking some notes!

     

    Bio:

    Dr. Alexander (Alex) Osterwalder is one of the world’s most influential innovation experts, a leading author, entrepreneur and in-demand speaker whose work has changed the way established companies do business and how new ventures get started.

    Ranked No. 4 of the top 50 management thinkers worldwide, Osterwalder is known for simplifying the strategy development process and turning complex concepts into digestible visual models. He invented the Business Model Canvas, Value Proposition Canvas, and Business Portfolio Map – practical tools that are trusted by millions of business practitioners from leading global companies.  

    Strategyzer, Osterwalder’s company, provides online courses, applications, and technology-enabled services to help organizations effectively and systematically manage strategy, growth and transformation.

    His books include the international bestseller Business Model Generation, Value Proposition Design: How to Create Products and Services Customers Want, Testing Business Ideas, The Invincible Company, and the recently-published High-Impact Tools for Teams

     

    Books/ Articles:

    1. The Invincible Company: Business Model Strategies From the World's Best Products, Services, and Organizations by Alexander Osterwalder & Yves Pigneur
    2. High-Impact Tools for Teams: 5 Tools to Align Team Members, Build Trust, and Get Results Fast by Stefano Mastrogiacomo & Alexander Osterwalder
    3. Testing Business Ideas: A Field Guide for Rapid Experimentation by David J. Bland & Alexander
    4. Business Model Generation: A Handbook for Visionaries, Game Changers, and Challengers by Alexander Osterwalder & Yves Pigneur
    5. Value Proposition Design: How to Create Products and Services Customers Want by Alexander Osterwalder & Yves Pigneur
    6. Brain Rules, Updated and Expanded: 12 Principles for Surviving and Thriving at Work, Home and School by John Medina
    7. Article: The Culture Map https://www.strategyzer.com/blog/posts/2015/10/13/the-culture-map-a-systematic-intentional-tool-for-designing-great-company-culture
    8. Article: Allan Mulally (former President and CEO, Ford Motor Company) https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alan_Mulally
    9. Article: Ping An (Banking & Insurance Group/ owner of Medical Platform ‘Good Doctor’) https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ping_An_Insurance

     

    Alex’s website & social media profiles:

     

     

    Interview Transcript

    Ula Ojiaku: [00:28]

    In this episode we have Dr. Alex Osterwalder. To many, he needs no introduction. He is known for his phenomenal work on developing the Business Model Canvas. He has authored or co-authored a growing library of books including Business Model Generation; Value Proposition Design - How to Create Products and Services Customers Want; Testing Business Ideas, and one of the topics we focused on was his book that was released back in 2020, The Invincible Company. Since then, he has released a new book that's titled, Tools for Teams.

    I must mention though, that some of the references to concepts like travelling around the world may not be relevant in this current COVID-19 pandemic situation. However, the key principles of entrepreneurship, intrapreneurship, innovation, leadership (mentioned in this conversation with Alex), I believe these are still timeless and valid. Anyway, ladies and gentlemen, with no further ado, my conversation with Alex Osterwalder.

     

    Ula Ojiaku: [01:49]

    Thank you, Alex, for joining us. It's an honour to have you on the show.

    Alex Osterwalder: [01:53]

    My pleasure. Great be here.

    Ula Ojiaku: [01:55]

    Great.  So, what would you say is your typical day, typical day in the life of Alex? How does it start?

    Alex Osterwalder: [02:04]

    It depends. So, you know, there's two typical days, one typical day is when I travel, and one typical day is when I don't travel, so they're very different - if you want. I probably spend about 50% of my time traveling all across the world talking about innovation, growth and transformation strategies. And then, you know, my day is I wake up, and it's “Oh, what country am I in now?”... And just trying to get the best out of the day and talk to people about growth and transformation. When I don't travel, my typical day is mixed between helping grow and manage, Strategyzer, the company I founded, but also spending a lot of time thinking about how, can we really help business leaders, business doers do a better job, right?

    So, I spend a lot of time thinking, sketching out things, I wouldn't say writing because when my co-authors and I create some content, it's usually more drawing first and writing after. But I'd say a lot of time, spent on pretty fundamental questions. And the rest of that when we're not thinking that we're doing or sharing. So that's the kind of mix - not very concrete maybe. But you know, it's so diverse, it really depends a little bit on the type of day, where I am, what the project is. So - very, very diverse days, I'd say.

    Ula Ojiaku: [03:22]

    What do you prefer - traveling or not traveling?

    Alex Osterwalder: [03:26]

    I enjoy both, right. So, what's important is after intense days of travel, you know, I just this week, I was in Paris with the CEOs of one of the largest companies in France. I like coming back to Switzerland and going on a hike in the mountains, while thinking about certain topics and digesting some of the things that I've seen. What I really enjoy is being in the field with doers and leaders seeing what they struggle with.

    But then being able to take the time to digest that and turn that into practical tools and processes that help them do a better job, right. So that mix is what I enjoy. The diversity is exactly what I enjoy.

    Ula Ojiaku: [04:07]

    That's great. You mentioned you like hiking, am I right in understanding that when you're not running workshops, or helping doers and businesses would hiking be one of your hobbies?

    Alex Osterwalder: [04:21]

    So, I can give you a concrete example, this week, I was traveling at the beginning of the week, and for two days, I had back to back calls for 12 hours with either leaders with my own team. So, tomorrow morning, I'm going to drive to the mountains - from my office, it’s about an hour away. During the drive, I take calls so I work on the drive, because I can schedule that in advance. And then I pack out my skis and I put what we call skins on the skis and I walk up the mountain for maybe 90 minutes, take the skins off and ski down for 10 minutes. That's it, right.

    So, during that kind of hike, it's just kind of airing out the brain. But, you know, I wouldn't say that's just leisure time that's actually thinking and digesting. So, I would think about either the topics of the week when I was in the field with real clients and business people struggling with growth and transformation issues, or thinking of my own team in my own leadership challenges.

    So, it's work but it's in a different context. Then, what's going to happen tomorrow is I’m gonna jump in the car again and drive back to the office in the afternoon - I work out of my office. So that's how a typical kind of day looks like when I have some time to get out of the building. I do go for a ski tour. But it isn't really disconnecting. It's just thinking in a different environment, and then come back to the office, and maybe sketch something out on the wall or on the whiteboard.

    Ula Ojiaku: [05:46]

    It also sounds like you’re kind of a visual person. So, you do lots of graphics, I mean, your books, The Business Model Generation, Value Proposition Design, and Testing Business Ideas - they are very visual and easy to read. Are you a very visual and artistic person?

    Alex Osterwalder: [06:06]

    Artistic, I'd not say because my visuals are pretty ugly, but visual 100%. So, I believe if you can't sketch it out, if you can't draw a problem, you probably didn't understand it well enough. Even complex challenges can be simplified down, not to mask the complexity, but actually just to get a handle of it and to think about the most essential things.

    So, the reason we use visuals in our books is actually less to just make them look pretty. It's because I do believe visuals are a language, a shared language. There are some things you can't describe easily with words. Like how am I going to describe with words my business model portfolio like that makes no sense, or even describing the business model with words doesn't really make sense. Sketching it out very quickly, and then having a paragraph that accompanies that sketch, that works right or even better, when I do presentations, I would build up the visual piece by piece while telling the story.

    So, I get bored when people say storytelling, and then it's a lot of blah, blah, blah. I like the storytelling with the visual message. And it's like a good voice over, you know, in a movie, that will go hand in hand. So, I think we don't use visual tools enough in our business practices. In certain circles, it's a tradition. If we take more of the IT field, you don't map out a server infrastructure without using visual tools. But in strategy and transformation, people talk too much, and they draw too little. Visual tools are unbeatable, they're unbeatable. They won't get you to do things completely differently. But they will get you to do things much faster, much clearer, because you have a shared language.

    So, when you have a shared language to map it out, to capture it, to create a visual artifact, you have better conversations about strategy, about business models, about culture. And that is incredibly important when we talk about these fuzzy topics, right? Or change management, like what the heck does that mean? But when you start visualizing this, we're moving from this state to that state. These are the obstacles; this is how we're going to overcome it. And you make all of that visual and tangible, not too much visuals, because then it's complicated, just the right amount. That is, you know, the magic of visual communication, where you still use words, you still can tell stories, but you just use the right communication tool at the right time.

    Ula Ojiaku: [08:37]

    You're saying, ‘…not too much visual, not too many words, just the right amount…’ How do you strike the balance?

    Alex Osterwalder: [08:46]

    You don't. So, the way you figure out if you're on track or not, is by testing it right? So, let's say I share a slide deck, I can see in people's faces, are they getting it? Are they not getting it? I can listen to their questions. When the questions are really about good details where you can see they understood the essence and now they're going a step further, they got it – right? When people are confused and they ask very fundamental questions of what I just explained. Well, guess what, then the problem is with me, not with them. I made a mistake in the way I told the story. So, I never blame the audience, I always look for the mistake within and say, ‘okay, what should I have done differently?’

    So, the way you figure out if you struck the right balance, is by continuously testing. And then obviously, over time, if you take visual language, we've gotten pretty good at creating visual books; we know what works, we know what doesn't. The challenge then is when you get good at it, is to not get arrogant. So, you always need to remember, well, you know, maybe the world changed. So, what worked yesterday doesn't work today.

    So, you go fast, because you know, but you always need to remain humble, because maybe you know something that was right yesterday, not today, you got to be careful. So you go fast, because you know, but you still listen enough to question yourself enough that you figure out, when do you need to change, because a lot of people get famous, and then they believe what they say, believe their own BS, they forget to stay grounded because the world changes, and you need to go with the change. So that's another balance - once you figured it out, you need to make sure time doesn't move faster than you otherwise you become the dinosaur in the room.

    Ula Ojiaku: [10:26]

    So how do you keep yourself grounded?

    Alex Osterwalder: [10:30]

    Yeah, so it's not always easy, right? So, if I just take our company, it's constantly trying to create a culture where people can speak up. Constantly trying to create a culture where people don't fear critique - design critique. That's not easy, because even though we have a pretty flat hierarchy, when you're the founder, you're the founder. So, people will say ‘yeah, but you know, I'm not gonna tell this guy he's full of BS.’ So, you need to create that culture where people dare to [speak up], that's number one.

    But then number two is just constantly staying curious, right? When you think you figured it out, you probably just know enough to come across, like looking like you figured it out, you know too little for really understanding it. So, I just work on the assumption that I never know enough. You can't know everything. Sometimes you don't need to go further because it's just you're now looking at the 20%. They're going to take too much time. But if you stay curious enough, you'll see the big shifts. If you listen to the weak signals, you'll see the big shift coming and you can surround yourself with people who are a little bit different.

    The more people are like you, the less you're going to see the shift coming and that's the problem of established companies. They do the same thing day in day out. They don't see what's coming. However, if, for example, you create a portfolio of projects where people can explore outside of your core business, then all of a sudden you see, ‘…wow, they're getting traction with that? I thought that was never going to be a market….’ And, ‘they're starting that customer segment – really?’ So, you need to create ecosystems that keep you alert. It's very hard again, so I don't trust myself to be able to check my own BS. So, you need to create ecosystems that keep you alert. I think that's the challenge. And you know, maybe my team will say, ‘yeah, Alex, you're talking about these things on a podcast.’ But you know, you don't really do that. So, I really have to be careful that that doesn't happen. That's why I admire people who can rise to really, really senior positions, but they stay grounded.

    One of my favorite examples is Alan Mulally. He turned Ford from a 17 billion loss-making monster into a profitable company. I was really fortunate to get to know him. And he's just grounded, like, a really nice guy. So, it doesn't mean when you have some success, you have to get full of yourself, you just stay grounded, because… we're all just people at the end of the day, right? But it's a challenge, right? It's always a challenge to remind yourself, I knew something now, maybe tomorrow, it's different. I get passionate about this stuff. So, I just go on rambling.

    Ula Ojiaku: [13:09]

    You know, I could go on listening to you. I am passionate about it from a learning perspective. Now, let's move on to the next section. I understand that the Business Model Generation, the book, which you wrote in collaboration with Yves Pigneur, I hope I pronounced his name correctly. Yeah. Oh, well, thank you. So, it came about as a result of the work you were doing as part of your PhD studies. Could you tell us a bit more about that story? And how, you finally arrived at the Business Model Generation book and the artifacts?

    Alex Osterwalder: [13:46]

    Sure, sure. So, in year 2000, I became a PhD student with Yves Pigneur. And he was looking for somebody who could help him with mapping out business models. And the fundamental idea was, can we kind of create some computer aided design system- so, we could build business models, like architects build buildings and computer aided design? That was the fundamental assumption. But in order to make computer systems like that, you need a rigorous approach, right? You need to model, what is a business model can be fuzzy, because otherwise, how are you going to build some kind of system around that?

    So, in architecture, it's easy. We're talking about structures and about materials. In business, it's a bit harder, what are the structures? What are the materials, what are the building blocks? So that was the starting point. And I did my PhD with him - amazing collaboration. Then I went out into the world and did a couple of things that work to help scale a global not-for-profit, then I had a consulting firm together with a friend. But then ultimately, the business model work I did on my PhD got some traction; people started asking me if I could speak in Colombia, in Mexico. First at the periphery - it was pretty interesting. People started downloading the PhD (thesis), reading it in companies… So, there were a lot of weak signals. And then, when I had enough of those, I asked Yves, ‘hey, let's write this book that we always wanted to write.’ So, we embarked on the journey of Business Model Generation. And we thought we can't write a book about business model innovation without doing it. So, we tried to do it in a different way. We did Kickstarter, before Kickstarter existed, we asked people to pay us, you know, because we needed the funding, or I didn't have any money, I just came out of doing not-for-profit work.

    So, we got people to pay us to help us write the book. And I did workshops around the world. And it was, really fun, entrepreneurial experience. And then we launched it and became a big success. And I think a little bit of the secret was, we built something with that book, or we designed something that we would have wanted to buy, there was no that there was no visual business book, there were visual business books, but not the type we wanted to buy. And turns out, almost 2 million people had the same kind of desire. And with that, we realized the power of visual books, we realized the power of visual tools. And we started digging deeper. And then we made more books, not because the world needs more books, they're enough out there. But we always tried to address the next business challenge we would see; we would try to create a tool. If the tool works, we would create a book around it. That was the Value Proposition Canvas. And we thought, okay, people are doing testing, but they're not really good at it. Let's write another book: Testing Business Ideas. And we did that in collaboration with David Bland.

    So, we created a library of experiments to help people get more professional. And then you know, we saw okay, large companies, they still can’t innovate. Why don't we write a book called The Invincible Company and we give them a tool that helps them to do this in a large established company. So, every time we see a challenge, we try to build the tool and the book around it to help people around the world. So, it's kind of the same. And what's fun is that behind that, behind the books, we build the technology stack to help actually bring those tools into companies. So, you know, Strategyzer doesn't earn, we earn some money from the books, but the core is really building the technology stack. So, the idea that we had in the PhD is now what we're building 20 years later.

    Ula Ojiaku: [17:21]

    Oh wow! Now when you mentioned that your company, Strategyzer, builds the technology stack on which the books are based. What do you mean by that?

    Alex Osterwalder: [17:32]

     Maybe the easiest way to describe it is that we believe in technology-enabled services. So typically, let's say big company comes to us and says, we want to work on growth and transformation, can you accompany one of our teams.

    Now, traditionally, a consultancy would just put a number of people on that. And then it's just the people are going to try to solve the problem - they sell hours. We look at it slightly differently. And we say there is a type of challenge that we can productize because it's actually the same challenge all the time, how do we go from idea to validation to scale. So, there are a couple of things there that are actually exactly the same for every single team that needs to go to through that process. And then there's some things that are very domain specific; in Pharma, you will test ideas differently than in Consumer Goods, etc., etc. But we would then start to build the online training and the software platform that would allow us to address that challenge of going from idea to validation to scale, in a lot more structured way, in a lot more technology enabled way.

    There’re things where a human coach adds huge value. And there's things where online learning or a software system will create a lot more value; online collaboration, tracking the data, comparing the data understanding how much have you de-risked your idea so far. I'm sharing that with senior leaders. All of that can be automated. The way I like to compare it is like ERP’s in companies like SAP and so changed operations, there are tons of companies out there and today, we have a lot less. But when they changed operations, they did that with software, I think the same is going to happen to strategy and innovation today. That today, we don't use a lot of good software, we use PowerPoint, Word, and maybe Excel, right? That's not good enough. Those are general purpose tools, which create a lot of value. But you shouldn't use those to manage your strategy and innovation, because that's becoming a very dynamic process.

    When you talk to a big company, a corporation, they have thousands of projects going on at the same time; thousand innovation projects. How do you manage that portfolio? It's more than just typical project management, we're talking innovation project portfolio, so you need to understand different things. That's the kind of infrastructure that we build, not just the software, also the tools and the content, online training, so become scalable, so people can change the way they work.

    Ula Ojiaku: [20:08]

    Fascinating. Now, when you talk about the automated part of your tech platform, are you talking about dashboards?

    Alex Osterwalder: [20:16]

    Yeah, let me give you a simple example. Right? So, when I'm a team, and I start mapping out my idea, an idea is just an idea, right? Technology, market opportunity… I need to create my Value Proposition Canvas and my Business Model Canvas to give it a little bit more shape. How am I going to capture value from customers? How am I going to capture value for my organization? Right - that you need to sketch out.

    Okay, you could use a digital tool to do that because then you can share as a team – sort of useful but not breakthrough. But then as a team, when you start to manage your hypothesis, you need to ask yourself, ‘okay, what needs to be true for this idea to work?’ You might have 10, 20, 50 hypotheses, you want to start to track those hypotheses. You want to start to track ‘how are you testing those hypotheses? What is the evidence that I've captured?’ You need actually whole-knowledge management around the evidence that you've captured in the field. ‘Oh, we did 50 interviews, we have about 30 quotes that confirm that people have a budget for that particular process’, right? That is not something you easily manage in a spreadsheet, it gets a mess very quickly; that's at the team level.

    Now, once you have that data captured, what if you could take that data and automatically create a risk profile so the team knows ‘this is how much we de risk our idea. Oh, we looked at desirability, maybe 10% of desirability, 20% of feasibility. We looked at some viability...’ Once you have data, you can manipulate the data in very different ways and understand the challenge better - that's at the team level. Now imagine at the senior level where you have, again, you know, 100, 500, 1,000 teams doing that; you want to understand which team is working on the biggest opportunity. ‘Okay, this one. But yeah, we invested maybe half a million dollars in that team, but they actually didn't de-risk the idea at all.’

    So, it looks like a great opportunity, but there's no de-risking. So actually, that might just be hot air, right? And you want to be able to do that for a thousand teams. Today, the way we do it is the teams pitch to a manager who pitches to the senior leader. And that's just a mess. So, it's very similar to what I mentioned with ERP. There's a lot of data there, that is hidden in different places - in spreadsheets and PowerPoint presentations. There's no way to aggregate that. So, guess what? Strategy today and innovation is badly managed - if people are doing it right, that's already another challenge. You know?

    Ula Ojiaku: [22:45]

    Okay

    Alex Osterwalder: [22:46]

    Today, people are not that good at strategy and innovation. But that's radically changing, because the tasks are getting really big. It's not just about profit, it's also about impact. So, there are a lot of exciting challenges ahead of us, that require a different toolset and different software stack to even be able to do that.

    Ula Ojiaku: [23:05]

    Wow. So, do you consider lean innovation important for organizations of all sizes? And if so, why? Why? Why? I know, it's an obvious question. But why do you consider that the case.

    Alex Osterwalder: [23:20]

    Very simple and the challenge is different for the startup than for the established company. So, for the startup… So, for both… let's start with what's shared. For both, it's a matter of survival, okay? Now, let me start with the team first. Well, what's the challenge when you're a startup, you don't have any customers, you don't have any revenues, you might have some self-funded or VC funding, you're gonna run out of money. And I think we're in an age where there's too much money.

    So, for a while you for quite a while, you can live without a business model, we have some great examples, billion-dollar unicorns that have no business model, and they're still alive, because they're just funded by VCs. That is a very rare thing. That's not for everybody.

    So, at one point, you do need to understand how you create and capture value. So, you want to get as fast as possible, from idea to not just validated business, but actually a company that makes money that captures value, right? Because, you know, yes, it is. You can say, ‘yeah, but the beginning is about users.’ That's okay. But users, you know, without revenues, not going to keep you alive for a while, VC funding is not a revenue stream. Let me just make that clear. VC funding is not a revenue stream.

    Ula Ojiaku: [24:34]

    They are out for a profit as well.

    Alex Osterwalder: [24:36]

    So sometimes young founders confuse that. Yeah, you can focus on funding. But ultimately, the funding needs to allow you to find a profitable and scalable business model. Sometimes people forget that. So that's survival at the startup stage, right? Now, what Lean does, and I'm not sure the word is very well chosen, because Lean comes actually from making things better. But in the startup world, is actually figuring out what's going to work in the first place, you're not making your business model better, you're trying to figure out which one is going to work.

    So, the testing of your idea is essential to get faster from idea to real business, or, in some cases, to shut it down. Because let's say you take VC money, and you find out, this is not a scalable business, you better give the money back or buy out the VC share, because all they care about is scale. And there's quite a few companies that bought back their shares, Buffer is a very well-known example, because they figured out the business model they're comfortable with, which is not further scaling. Highly profitable… definitely growth, but not the insane kind of growth VC venture capital’s looking for.

    So you get faster from idea to real business with the Lean Startup approach and Customer Development by Steve Blank and Eric Reis, or you get faster to the point where you say, ‘this is not working, I'm going to change, I'm going to stop - not pivot - I'm going to stop.’ And then, radical pivot - maybe you start a new startup with a completely different goal. That's for startups.

    For the established companies, it's a matter of survival for a different reason. Because their business models are dying and expiring. So, most established companies are very good at efficiency innovation; new technologies, digital transformation…, they improve their business model. Now, that is important, and you need to do it. But if you just get better at what you're doing while your business model is dying, you're just going to more efficiently die. So, at the same time, you need to learn how to reinvent yourself. So, it's a matter of survival that you figure out what's tomorrow's business model. And you can't do that without the Lean approach because it's not about making big bets, it's about making a lot of small bets. But here's the nugget that people get wrong. So, they say, ‘yeah, we're gonna do Lean Startup.’ So, they have five projects, and they believe that out of those five projects, if we just pivot enough, we're gonna get a multibillion-dollar growth engine. That is delusion at its best. Because, if you look at early stage venture capital, you actually need to invest in at least 250 projects to get one breakthrough success.

    So, what it means for established companies, if they really want to find the winner, they need to invest in tons of losers. And they're not losers, per se. But some of those projects need to be killed after three months, some of those projects might make 10 million or $100 million in revenues. But only something like one out of 250 will move towards 500 million or a billion. That, is a matter of survival. So, the companies that don't build an innovation portfolio and don't apply Lean in a broad way, not for five projects, not enough - that's what I call innovation theater. They need to apply it across the board, right? And I think that's where Steve Blank’s work, our work together has actually made a pretty big difference.

    Now, we just need to convert a couple more companies, because there are only very few that have been able to pull this off - that are really what we would call ‘Invincible Companies.’

    Ula Ojiaku: [28:15]

    Can you tell me a bit more about the book, Invincible Company?

    Alex Osterwalder: [28:19]

    So, there are three main components to the Invincible Company. Let me tell you about the three characteristics of an invincible company. The first thing is, invincible companies constantly reinvent themselves. So, they're not laying back and saying, ‘hey, I was successful’, they don't get arrogant. They constantly reinvent themselves. Typical example is Amazon, constantly reinventing their business model; going into Amazon Web Services, going into logistics, etc. That's number one.

    Number two, invincible companies, they don't compete on products and technology alone. They compete on superior business models. I believe it's much harder to stay ahead with technology because it’s easy to copy. Patents don't make that much sense alone anymore. It's all about speed. So today, if you don't build a superior business model, it's hard to stay ahead. Let me give you an example.

    Take Apple with the iPhone. It's not the phone per se that's keeping them ahead. What's keeping them ahead is the ecosystem around iOS, with a lot of developers that create a lot of applications; you cannot copy that. You can copy the phone technology - there are tons of phone makers out there. There’re only two operating systems, right. So that's a superior business model.

    The third one is, invincible companies; they transcend industry boundaries. Today, if you look at Amazon, you can't classify them in an industry. They do e-commerce, they do logistics for IT for, you know, web, web infrastructure for companies around the world. Their logistics company - they're competing with UPS. So, you can't classify them in an industry, they have a superior business model. My favorite example, at the moment is a company called Ping An in China, one of the top 30 largest companies in the world, in terms of profitability. Well, what did they do? They moved within seven years, from being a banking and insurance conglomerate, towards becoming a technology player that built the biggest health platform on the planet, a platform called Good Doctor. That came from a bank and insurer - can you imagine that? Right? So, they transcended industry boundaries. And that's why they're ahead of everybody else.

    So, those are the three characteristics of invincible companies. And then in the book we show well, how do you actually get there? We just described you know, how that animal looks like. How do you become that? So, three things. One, you need to manage a portfolio of business models, you need to improve what you have, and invent the future - innovation funnels, etc… What I just told you before.  It's not about making five bets, it's about making 250 bets. And how do you manage that? How do you manage measure risk and uncertainty?

    Second thing, superior business models; we have a library of patterns, business model patterns, where we give inspiration to people so they can ask themselves questions: ‘How could I improve my business model? How could I create recurring revenues? How could I create a resource castle to protect my business model? How could I shift from product to service? How could I shift like Apple from selling a device to becoming a platform?’ So that's the second aspect. And then the third one, which most companies are struggling with, is ‘how do I create an innovation culture systematically? How do I design and manage an innovation culture?’ So, it's almost, you could say three books in one. So, you get three for one, if you get The Invincible Company.

    Ula Ojiaku: [31:54]

    It sounds very exciting in terms of the work that you must have done to collate these trends and attributes that make up an invincible company. So, what exactly made you guys now say, ‘hey, we need to write this book?’

    Alex Osterwalder: [32:09]

    That's a question we always ask because there's so many books out there; the world does not need another business book. So, if we put energy into this, because these projects are pretty big, we had a team of five people working on it, three designers actually six people, three content people. So, it's a crazy effort. The reason was very simple. We had already put a lot of tools out there  - and processes - and companies were not moving at the scale we believe is necessary for them to transform to either revive their business models, or tackle challenges like climate change, right?

    So, you have to be very inventive, innovative, to actually make a profit and become sustainable, like Unilever. So, we said, ‘well, what's missing?’ And the big piece missing is the shared language at the senior level, where they can think about ‘how do I manage a portfolio of businesses to fight off disruption? So, I don't get disrupted. But so, I am among the disruptors. So, I invent the future, like Ping An, like Amazon - they invent the future.’ You know, they're not the victim of Porter's five forces, they shaped entire industries, right? Porter's five forces was 1985. That's quite a while ago. ‘The world’s changed; we need new analytical tools…’, I like to joke, right? But so, we didn't see companies moving enough. So, we asked, ‘could we create the tools to help these companies to help the leaders change?’ So, we created a very practical set of tools and processes, and procedures so these companies would start to move. Because a lot of senior leaders will tell you, ‘but innovation is a black box. I don't know how to do this. I know how to do mergers and acquisitions. But I don't really know how to do this innovation thing.’

    So, they kind of move towards buzzwords. ‘Yeah, we're gonna do agile!’ Well, that means nothing per se. So yeah, we're gonna work in an agile way when we do this. But that's the mindset. But there's a more to it when you really want to start building an invincible company. So, we packaged all of what we've learned in the field, plus our whole thinking of how can we make it easy for them to capture and work on it. So, taking down the barriers to action, so nothing would prevent them from action. That's how we always decide, ‘should we do another book?’ Well, only if we believe we have a very substantial contribution to make.

    Ula Ojiaku: [34:37]

    Talking about the three ‘hows’ of becoming an invincible company, you did say that the third element was about changing the culture.

     Alex Osterwalder: [34:48]

    Yeah, sure. Yeah. Yeah.

    Ula Ojiaku: [34:49]

    Now, there is this book I read by John Kotter about Leading Change...

    Alex Osterwalder: [34:57]

    Yeah, yeah absolutely

    Ula Ojiaku: [34:58]

    And culture changes last. So, what's your view on how best to change culture because usually, people are resistant to change?

    Alex Osterwalder: [35:09]

    So, I believe you can actively design and manage culture. You know, every company has a culture.  It’s just that very few companies design and manage their culture. So, the first thing is, you need to map out the culture that you have. So again, we're tool obsessed. So, we created a tool together with Dave Gray called the Culture Map. And with the Culture Map, you can map out the culture you have, and you can design the culture you want. Okay, that's in a general way.

    In The Invincible Company, we talk about innovation culture. So, we show what are the blockers that are holding companies back from creating an innovation culture? And we show what are the enablers that companies would have to put in place to create an innovation culture? So simple stuff, right? What's the blocker? I'll give you some blockers. Companies require business plans, business plans are the enemy of innovation, because you force people to sketch out a fantasy over 50 pages, and then you invest in a fantasy and it blows up in your face. It's ridiculous.

    So, business plans are one enemy of innovation. It's a blocker. Okay, let's look at an enabler. An enabler would be to embrace a culture where you can experiment, fail, learn and iterate. That sounds trivial. But in most companies, you cannot fail, you'll jeopardize your career. So, you need to create a space where experimentation and failure is not just possible - it's mandatory because you know, you need to test ideas. So, if you don't do that deliberately; if you don't have the governance that's going to reward that, in the right place, it’s not going to work. And now a lot of people would say, ‘yeah, we do that… we do that.’ But it depends how you're doing ‘that’.

    So, we're very specific with these things and say, well, ‘you're at risk of having an innovation theater, if you don't enable leadership support.’ ‘Yeah, well our leaders are supporting it…’ Okay? ‘How much time is your leader, your CEO spending on innovation every week?’ If he or she is not spending 40% of his or her time on innovation, innovation will not happen at that company, period. So that's an enabler that is not a soft factor is a very hard factor. Because it's actually even less about what the CEO does. It's the symbolic value of a CEO spending 40% of his or her time on innovation, which will show ‘this is important.’ And then everybody will work towards what's important for the senior leadership.

    So, all those kinds of things - we codify them, to take them from the anecdotal evidence towards, ‘here are the three areas you need to look at: leadership support, organizational design, innovation practice. You need to work on those three areas. And you can start to systematically design an innovation culture.’ So, I'd say the difference between the days of Kotter, I still love Kotter's work, is I do believe today, we can more actively design culture and make it happen. Is it easy? No, it’s really hard. Are we going to face resistance? Yes. But if you do it well, I can tell you when it comes to innovation, people are hungry for it. They're just waiting for it. So, all you have to do - you don't even need to design enablers, just take away the obstacles and everything else will happen.

    Ula Ojiaku: [38:40]

    Oh, fantastic. So, the what book do you find yourself giving as a gift to people the most and why - in addition to your fantastic suite of books?

    Alex Osterwalder: [38:53]

    So… there's just so many that I don't have one ‘go-to’ book that I would really recommend. It's depending on what are people looking at, you know, what is their challenge, and I would recommend the right kind of book that I have in mind for the right challenge. So, I don't like doing an overall thing. There is one book that I just put is the foundation of working the right way, which is John Medina's Brain Rules.

    So, it's actually a brain scientist. He's very funny. He wrote a book called Brain Rules. It's all based on peer reviewed science, there's a certain number of rules that you need to follow in everything you do: designing a workshop, managing your company, you know, teaching something, being a parent. So, if you follow those brain rules, well, you're very likely to have more success. With the work you're doing, you're gonna achieve better results, because you're following the way your brain works, right? And a lot of the work we do is actually not, not right. So, I'll give you an example.

    He talks about visuals, every single person on the planet is visual, guess what? It’s evolution – (there) used to be a lion running after us. Well, we would need to see it and run away. That's visual. That's evolution. Those who didn't see it coming, they're not here anymore, right? Evolution ate them up. So, we're visual, by definition. That's why when you write when you create a book or a slide deck, using visuals is not a nice to have; of course, everybody has their style. But if you really do it well, you use the words for the right thing, use visuals for the right thing, you're gonna have a huge impact. Because by evolution, every one of us, every single one of us is visual. So that's one brain rule, which sounds a little bit trivial. But the really good insights there of rules you should never break. Right? So that's one I do recommend.

    But then everything else is based on the challenges I see with, you know, what people are struggling with.

    Ula Ojiaku: [40:47]

    I would add that to my library of books to read then. Now, would you have any advice for individuals starting up in their entrepreneurship journey? And also, what advice would you have? So, there are two questions here: what do you have for organizations starting off their lean innovation journey? So, individuals and organizations.

    Alex Osterwalder: [41:14]

    So, for both, I would say fear nothing, embrace failure. So, you know, then people tell me, ‘don't always talk about failure. It's not about failure. It's not about failures, is it? It's about learning.’ No, it's not about learning. It's about actually adapting your idea until you figure out what works, right? But a lot of that will be failure. And a big part of the innovation journey is you know, falling down and getting up. So, my big advice to individuals is, don't believe those people on the cover of a magazine because you don't see the failure they went through. And if there's somebody who didn't have that much failure, they kind of got lucky. But that's one in a million.

    So, don't get blinded by those pictures that the press put in front of us. Success; there is no shortcut. Yeah, you can get lucky. But that's one out of a million. Success is hard work. It's a lot of failure. It's a lot of humiliation. Those who get over humiliation, those who can stand up, those are, those are gonna win.

    However, sometimes you need to stop, right? So, when people say, ‘ah, never give up!’ Well, knowing when to stop is not giving up. When you're not made for something, when the idea (you had) – (you find out) there’s no business there, you better stop because you're gonna waste all of your money and energy for something that's not there. But you can take those learnings and apply it, maybe to a different opportunity. So never, never fear failure, right is an important one to always get up. That's for individuals. For companies, I'd say go beyond innovation theater. So, break the myths and figure out how innovation really works. Open up what still might be a black box or question yourself, you know, are we really doing Strategic Growth and Innovation? Because a lot of companies will say, ‘Yeah, we do that, we do Lean Startup, we do Agile.’ Yeah, but then you look under the hood, it's really innovation theater. When you really do this well, you actually invest in 200, 300, 400 projects at a time, small amounts. And you're really good at killing ideas to let the best emerge.

    So, it's not about making a few big bets. It's about making hundreds and hundreds of small bets. And then continuously invest like a venture capitalist in those ideas and teams that are bubbling up, right. So, go beyond innovation theater, learn how this really works. This is a profession. This is not something you learn over a weekend at a masterclass anymore. That's how you get started. This is a hard profession treated differently than management. Managing an innovation, management and execution and innovation and entrepreneurship are two different planets. So please accept that. That's my advice to organizations. Take it seriously, otherwise, you're gonna die.

    Ula Ojiaku: [43:51]

    Thank you so much. It's been a wonderful conversation with you, Alex, thank you again for being on this show.

    Alex Osterwalder: [43:58]

    Thanks for having me. Wonderful questions. Great conversation.

    E57: How She Built Her Confidence, and Then an Empire with Krissy Cela

    E57: How She Built Her Confidence, and Then an Empire with Krissy Cela
    Parts of this episode made me feel uncomfortable, it may make you feel the same, but trust me, you need to hear this! This week I sat down with Krissy Cela, this was such a brave, truthful conversation! From being an immigrant, bullied on the school playground to becoming a multi-millionaire entrepreneur, author and one of the UK’s most recognised fitness trainers. Krissy shared the highs, but also the lows of being an entrepreneur that most won’t speak about. She's now the CEO of a business valued at almost £100m. This is the raw, unfiltered truth of Krissy Cela Topics: - Justifying myself as a woman - Building my confidence with the gym - Growing Apart from my ex - I hate talk about my success - Are you hard to date - Your parents - The pressure on women - The bullshit of being an entrepreneur - Somethings o have to give in my life - Are you scared of death - Having friends as an entrepreneur - What are you working on? Kissy's book pre order - https://www.amazon.co.uk/Do-This-You-Strong-Inside/dp/1783254203 Sponsor - https://uk.huel.com/ Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

    #703: Sheila Heen — How to Master the Difficult Art of Receiving (and Giving) Feedback

    #703: Sheila Heen — How to Master the Difficult Art of Receiving (and Giving) Feedback

    Brought to you by Nordic Naturals Ultimate Omega fish oil, Helix Sleep premium mattresses, and ShipStation shipping software.

    Sheila Heen has spent the last three decades working to understand how people can better navigate conflict, with a particular specialty in difficult conversations. 

    She is a founder of Triad Consulting Group, a professor at Harvard Law School, and a co-author of Thanks for the Feedback: The Science and Art of Receiving Feedback Well (even when it’s off base, unfair, poorly delivered, and, frankly, you’re not in the mood), with Douglas Stone, and Difficult Conversations: How to Discuss What Matters Most, with Douglas Stone and Bruce Patton (with a newly updated third edition that was released in August).

    Sheila and her colleagues at Triad work with leaders and organizations to build their capacity to have the conversations that matter most. Her clients have included Pixar, American Express, the NBA, the Singapore Supreme Court, the Obama White House, and theologians struggling with the nature of truth and God.

    She is schooled in negotiation daily by her three children. You can find my first conversation with Sheila at tim.blog/SheilaHeen.

    Please enjoy!

    This episode is brought to you by Nordic Naturals, the #1-selling fish-oil brand in the US! More than 80% of Americans don’t get enough omega-3 fats from their diet. That is a problem because the body can’t produce omega-3s, an important nutrient for cell structure and function. Nordic Naturals solves that problem with their doctor-recommended Ultimate Omega fish-oil formula for heart health, brain function, immune support, and more. Ultimate Omega is made exclusively from 100% wild-caught sardines and anchovies. It’s incredibly pure and fresh with no fishy aftertaste. All Nordic Naturals’ fish-oil products are offered in the triglyceride molecular form—the form naturally found in fish, and the form your body most easily absorbs.

    Go to Nordic.com and discover why Nordic Naturals is the #1-selling omega-3 brand in the U.S. Use promo code TIM for 20% off your order of Ultimate Omega.

    *

    This episode is also brought to you by ShipStation. Do you sell stuff online? Then you know what a pain the shipping process is. ShipStation was created to make your life easier. Whether you’re selling on eBay, Amazon, Shopify, or over 100 other popular selling channels, ShipStation lets you access all of your orders from one simple dashboard, and it works with all of the major shipping carriers, locally and globally, including FedEx, UPS, and USPS. 

    Join the 130,000+ companies that have grown their ecommerce businesses with ShipStation. Tim Ferriss Show listeners get to try ShipStation free for 60 days! Just visit ShipStation.com/Tim!

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    This episode is also brought to you by Helix SleepHelix was selected as the best overall mattress of 2022 by GQ magazine, Wired, and Apartment Therapy. With Helix, there’s a specific mattress to meet each and every body’s unique comfort needs. Just take their quiz—only two minutes to complete—that matches your body type and sleep preferences to the perfect mattress for you. They have a 10-year warranty, and you get to try it out for a hundred nights, risk-free. They’ll even pick it up from you if you don’t love it. And now, Helix is offering 20% off all mattress orders plus two free pillows at HelixSleep.com/Tim.

    *

    [07:01] Conversations are the relationship.

    [08:12] How should we talk about feedback?

    [11:16] De-escalating the ask.

    [13:30] Addressing victim-blaming feedback for the new edition of Difficult Conversations.

    [28:48] How I’ve dealt with reader (and proofreader) feedback.

    [41:18] Making use of the three types of feedback.

    [49:05] Received difficult feedback? Phone a friend.

    [54:36] Discovering a good/bad match early in the dating game.

    [00:59:30] How I’ve traditionally handled conflict and stress.

    [1:07:50] The conundrum of feedback’s source.

    [1:09:03] Three triggered reactions to feedback.

    [1:12:09] The you plus me combination.

    [1:20:16] What does resolution look like?

    [1:22:52] The Gottman Institute.

    [1:29:35] Coping with a relationship’s unresolvable frictions.

    [1:33:41] The courtship of Sheila’s sister.

    [1:37:11] A thirst for vindictiveness and other deal breakers.

    [1:43:31] Learning from the comfort of our strengths.

    [1:45:43] Perspective from three positions.

    [1:47:09] How to extend positive reinforcement.

    [1:51:26] Giving feedback without starting a fight.

    [1:55:12] Asking “one thing” questions as a leader.

    [1:57:43] Are you aware of your need to receive feedback?

    [2:02:13] Parting thoughts.

    *

    For show notes and past guests on The Tim Ferriss Show, please visit tim.blog/podcast.

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    317. Radical Leftist turned Conservative Activist | Amala Ekpunobi

    317. Radical Leftist turned Conservative Activist | Amala Ekpunobi

    Dr. Peterson's extensive catalog is available now on DailyWire+: https://utm.io/ueSXh

     

    Dr Jordan B Peterson and Amala Ekpunobi discuss her early life being raised in a far left household, the instances that caused her to question the all-encompassing ideology she had been fed, and her rise to providence as an internet and podcast personality, advocating for the truth across party lines.

     

    Raised in a far-left activist household, twenty-two-year-old Amala Ekpunobi was once a student organizer for the left. Unanswered questions–and a search for the truth–led her to a complete ideological transformation. Passionately sharing her new conservative values online, Amala became a viral social media sensation. Now the host of PragerU’s popular show “Unapologetic with Amala,” she inspires millions of young people every day to discover the truth, defend their values, and lead better lives.

     

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    - Links -

     

    For Amala Ekpunobi

     

    Amala Ekpunobi on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/theamalaekpunobi/

     

    PragerU on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/prageru/

     

    Amala's YouTube Channel: https://www.youtube.com/@AmalaEkpunobiUnapologetic

     

    PragerU's Website: https://www.prageru.com/

     

    - Chapters -

     

    (0:00) Coming up

    (1:34) Intro

    (4:36) Amala and PragerU

    (9:00) Being a voice of reason

    (11:10) Notoriety helps

    (15:30) Viral vitriol

    (17:40) Pressure under truth

    (20:05) Ego and humility

    (21:00) Young Peterson and the NDP

    (25:00) Siren calls of the left

    (29:00) Fault in the ethos of compassion

    (35:35) Argument and affirmation loops

    (43:30) Bullies and reaction

    (45:50) The axiom behind pride

    (50:20) Greta Thunberg, making an oracle

    (53:43) Starting early, rise of the activist

    (56:56) Then and now, self verification

    (1:01:30) Knowing your thoughts

    (1:04:34) Argument and the cycle of growth

    (1:13:28) Peterson on managing his humility

    (1:17:00) Importance of reminders

    (1:20:00) Behavior and the public eye

    (1:24:00) Nobility despite tragedy

    (1:27:00) Trait neuroticism, Wim Hof

    (1:29:14) Accountability

    (1:34:46) Conflict delayed is conflict multiplied

     

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