Logo
    Search

    Under the Crabapple Tree

    enSeptember 22, 2023

    Podcast Summary

    • Celebrating Latine culture and uncovering a scandalDiscover diverse cultures through PopSugar Juntos on Amazon Prime and save money with Progressive Insurance, potentially uncovering unexpected scandals

      PopSugar Juntos celebrates Latine culture and offers a variety of content, from interviews with Latine creators to exclusive interviews with music artists, available on Amazon Prime. Additionally, Progressive Insurance encourages listeners to save money by switching to their services, offering an average savings of $750 for new customers. The story shared highlights the discovery of a scandal involving a choir singer, Eleanor Mills, and a prominent local minister, Reverend Edward Wheeler Hall, whose bodies were found under a tree with love letters and a business card. The discovery led to a scandal due to their extramarital affair, and Eleanor's husband initially denied any wrongdoing. Overall, this discussion emphasizes the importance of celebrating diverse cultures and the potential for unexpected discoveries, while also encouraging listeners to explore cost-saving opportunities.

    • The Murder of Reverend Hall and Eleanor Mills: A National Sensation Fueled by MediaThe media, particularly tabloids, fueled public fascination with the murder of Reverend Hall and Eleanor Mills, shaping perception of suspect Frances Hall through gossip and rumors, despite lack of clear evidence.

      The murder of Reverend Edward Hall and Eleanor Mills in 1922 was a national sensation, fueled by gossip and sensationalized by the media, particularly the newly popular tabloid newspapers. Frances Hall, Reverend Hall's wife, was initially seen as an unsuspecting spouse, but rumors of an intimate relationship between her husband and Eleanor cast doubt on her innocence. Witnesses reported seeing them together in public and the frequency of Reverend Hall's visits to the Mills home raised suspicions. The scandal was a boon for the tabloid press, and the Daily News, in particular, saw significant growth from the story. Despite no clear evidence, Frances' marriage to Edward was seen as curious due to his previous romantic attachments. The case illustrates the power of the media to shape public perception and the enduring fascination with scandals involving prominent figures.

    • A woman's unexpected marriage and a murder mysteryAn elderly woman's sudden marriage to a charismatic man led to a murder investigation, with suspects ranging from the wife to a young friend, ultimately highlighting the complexities of human relationships and the difficulties in solving crimes with limited evidence.

      The case of Reverend Edward Hall's murder in New Brunswick in 1897 involved several intriguing twists and turns. Frances Hall, the reverend's wife, was considered an unlikely candidate for marriage at the time due to her advanced age and lack of prospects. However, she unexpectedly married the charismatic Pastor Hall. There were rumors that he might have been a gold digger, as they became prominent figures in New Brunswick. On the night of the murder, a neighbor was awakened by a barking dog and saw a woman, believed to be Frances, entering the Hall's house. She claimed she was looking for her husband, who had been carrying a significant amount of money and an expensive gold watch when he left their house but was found with only a few cents. The police initially suspected a young man, a friend of the couple who found the bodies, but a witness came forward claiming to have seen the murders, exonerating the young man. The case highlights the complexities of human relationships and the challenges faced by law enforcement in solving crimes with limited evidence.

    • Traveling with Confidence: Verifying InformationVerify credibility of eyewitness accounts and fact-check information to ensure enjoyable travel experiences and avoid potential inaccuracies or biases.

      Relying on firsthand accounts and reviews from trusted sources can help travelers plan enjoyable experiences with confidence. The Viator app, for instance, offers real traveler reviews, free cancellation, and 247 customer support, making it a valuable resource for travelers. However, as the story of the pig woman and the murder case illustrates, it's essential to verify the credibility of eyewitness accounts and be cautious of potential inaccuracies or biases. In the end, the pig woman's shifting story and questionable background undermined her credibility and highlighted the importance of fact-checking and verifying information before making assumptions or jumping to conclusions.

    • Media's relentless pursuit of the Hall Mills murder investigationThe media, led by the Daily News and its editor Phil Payne, kept the public engaged with the Hall Mills murder investigation through persistent coverage, even when the official investigation seemed to have reached a dead end.

      The Hall Mills murder investigation was a sensational story in the 1920s, but after the grand jury's decision not to bring any indictments, the media was left to pursue other leads. Frances Hall, the prime suspect, had left the country, and the investigation seemed to have reached a dead end. However, the Daily News, led by tabloid editor Phil Payne, continued to pursue the story, focusing on Jim Mills, the widower of the victim. The investigation revealed that Jim and Eleanor had a troubled marriage, with financial struggles and Eleanor's desire for a better life. Jim's relationship with the reverend, who was found next to Eleanor's body, added intrigue to the case. Despite the lack of progress in the investigation, the media continued to fuel public interest in the story, turning it into a sensation.

    • Investigators and journalists used unconventional methods to solve crimes in the 1920sStaging a seance with a fake medium didn't lead to a confession immediately but the relentless investigation by journalists and police eventually led to the arrest of the suspect four years later.

      During the early 1920s, investigators and journalists used unconventional methods to solve crimes, including staging a seance to try and scare a suspect into confessing. In the case of the Mills-Hall double murder, investigators believed Jim Mills could be the culprit, and journalist Phil Payne came up with the idea to stage a seance with a fake medium named Madame Astra. Despite the hours-long charade, Jim Mills did not confess. However, over the next few years, the Daily News and later the New York Daily Mirror continued to investigate the case and uncovered new evidence, including a fingerprint match and testimony from a former maid. Four years after the murders, Francis Hall was arrested for the crime. This unusual combination of journalistic investigation and police work ultimately led to the arrest of the suspect.

    • The Trial of Frances Hall: A Media SensationThe trial of Frances Hall in 1926 was a media sensation with sensational testimonies and inconsistencies, similar to modern high-profile cases. Try Powermeal, a protein-packed superfood shake in eco-friendly packaging, with a discount during Earth Month using code NSP.

      The trial of Frances Hall and her brothers in 1926 was a media sensation unlike anything America had seen before. With hundreds of journalists descending on the small town of Somerville for the trial, the event was described as a "media circus." During the trial, various witnesses were called to testify, including a doctor who revealed that Eleanor Mills' tongue, larynx, and windpipe were missing. Jane Gibson, the famous pig farmer, was also a highly anticipated witness, despite her ill health. The prosecutor believed Frances' story, despite its inconsistencies, and Jane Gibson eventually testified, making a dramatic procession from Jersey City to Somerville. In the modern world, we can find parallels in sensational trials, like the OJ Simpson case. Meanwhile, Powermeal offers a more positive takeaway – a satisfying, protein-packed superfood shake in sustainable packaging, available at a discount during Earth Month with the code NSP at naturesunshine.com.

    • Testimony of key witness Jane Gibson from hospital bed leads to not guilty verdictDespite inconsistent testimony and skepticism, Jane Gibson's identification led to a not guilty verdict for three defendants in a murder trial. Journalist Phil Payne's involvement renewed interest in the case, which later resulted in a libel lawsuit against the Daily Mirror.

      The testimony of Jane Gibson, a key witness in a murder trial, was given from a hospital bed in the courthouse. Gibson identified Frances Hall and her brothers as being present during the murders, but her story changed over the years and was met with skepticism from the jury. Despite this, the jury ultimately returned a not guilty verdict for all three defendants. The investigation gained renewed attention due to the involvement of journalist Phil Payne, who was determined to uncover sensational stories for his newspaper. Frances Hall, the prime suspect, maintained her innocence but eventually acknowledged her husband's infidelity during the trial. After the trial, she filed a libel lawsuit against the Daily Mirror for their coverage of the case, which was later settled. The case remains controversial, and it's unclear why the story was not told in the 48 years following the trial.

    • The Hall-Mills Murder Case: A Mysterious Hiring of HitmenThe Hall-Mills Murder Case in the 1920s involved conflicting stories, secrets, and unproven allegations of the Hall family hiring hitmen to silence those involved in a scandal. Despite no concrete evidence, the family's desire to protect their reputation and the many secrets that came to light suggest a possible involvement.

      The case of the murders of Reverend Edward Hall and Eleanor Mills in the 1920s, which became a major scandal, involved a confession from a man named Julius Baljag in 1969. Baljag claimed that Willie Stevens, a brother of Reverend Hall, had hired him to help deliver money to two small-time gangsters named Ike and Freddie. Baljag further claimed that these men were paid to kill the Hall family. However, there was no concrete evidence to support this story, and it's unclear if Baljag's story is entirely true. Despite this, the circumstances surrounding the case and the behavior of the Hall family throughout the investigation suggest that there may have been some truth to the allegations. The family's desire to protect their reputation and the many secrets that came to light during the investigation make it plausible that they may have been involved in hiring hitmen to silence those involved in the scandal. Ultimately, the case remains a mystery, with many unanswered questions and conflicting stories.

    • A team produces Criminal podcast with various platforms and sponsorsThe Criminal podcast is produced by a team, available on multiple platforms, and funded by sponsors Progressive and Nature's Sunshine

      The Criminal podcast is produced by a team including Susanna Robertson, Jackie Sacico, Libby Foster, Samantha Brown, Lily Clark, Megan Kinane, and Rob Byers, with engineering by Russ Henry and original illustrations by Julian Alexander. The podcast, which covers true crime stories, can be found on various platforms including criminalshow.com, Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, and YouTube. Criminal is recorded at North Carolina Public Radio, WUNC, and is part of the Vox Media Podcast Network. Listeners can save money by switching to Progressive Insurance, and this month, Nature's Sunshine offers 25% off the first order with code NSP for Earth Month specials on their power line, Powerbeats, and Power Meal. Phoebe Judge hosts the show, and sponsors include Progressive and Nature's Sunshine. If you enjoy the show, consider sharing it with a friend or leaving a review.

    Recent Episodes from Criminal

    Ten Thousand Feet in the Air

    Ten Thousand Feet in the Air
    On the afternoon of June 23rd, 1972, Martin McNally walked into the St. Louis airport with a wig, a sawed-off rifle, and a plan. Special thanks to Danny Wicentowski. Learn more at the Riverfront Times: “The Final Flight of Martin McNally.” This episode was originally released in 2018. To hear the second part of this story, “The Fox,” click here.  How are we doing? Help us improve by completing our audience survey: https://thisiscriminal.com/survey. Say hello on Twitter, Facebook and Instagram. Sign up for our occasional newsletter, The Accomplice. Follow the show and review us on Apple Podcasts: iTunes.com/CriminalShow. Sign up for Criminal Plus to get behind-the-scenes bonus episodes of Criminal, ad-free listening of all of our shows, members-only merch, and more. Learn more and sign up here. Listen back through our archives at youtube.com/criminalpodcast. We also make This is Love and Phoebe Reads a Mystery. Artwork by Julienne Alexander. Check out our online shop. Episode transcripts are posted on our website. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices
    Criminal
    enJuly 05, 2024

    State of North Carolina v. Joan Little

    State of North Carolina v. Joan Little
    When Karen Bethea-Shields was in college, she heard a judge say, “No way in the world a Black woman can get raped.” A few years later, in 1975, she helped successfully defend Joan Little—a Black woman—who became the first woman in the U.S. to be found not guilty of murder using the defense that she used deadly force to resist sexual assault. Say hello on Twitter, Facebook and Instagram. Sign up for our occasional newsletter, The Accomplice. Follow the show and review us on Apple Podcasts: iTunes.com/CriminalShow. Sign up for Criminal Plus to get behind-the-scenes bonus episodes of Criminal, ad-free listening of all of our shows, members-only merch, and more. Learn more and sign up here. Listen back through our archives at youtube.com/criminalpodcast. We also make This is Love and Phoebe Reads a Mystery. Artwork by Julienne Alexander. Check out our online shop. Episode transcripts are posted on our website. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices
    Criminal
    enJune 28, 2024

    The Demon Spread

    The Demon Spread
    “The ingenuity of depraved human genius has culminated in the production of margarine.” Say hello on Twitter, Facebook and Instagram. Sign up for our occasional newsletter, The Accomplice. Follow the show and review us on Apple Podcasts: iTunes.com/CriminalShow. Sign up for Criminal Plus to get behind-the-scenes bonus episodes of Criminal, ad-free listening of all of our shows, members-only merch, and more. Learn more and sign up here. Listen back through our archives at youtube.com/criminalpodcast. We also make This is Love and Phoebe Reads a Mystery. Artwork by Julienne Alexander. Check out our online shop. Episode transcripts are posted on our website. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices
    Criminal
    enJune 21, 2024

    One Troy

    One Troy
    The Lawrence H. Woodward funeral home in Brooklyn has been run by one family for generations, and has handled many funerals for victims of violent crime. When we visited, one funeral director told us, “I don’t think people understand when you’re dealing with a victim who’s been shot – we see these things. It’s a mental toll on the person that has to now look at this gunshot victim and put them back together.” Say hello on Twitter, Facebook and Instagram. Sign up for our occasional newsletter, The Accomplice. Follow the show and review us on Apple Podcasts: iTunes.com/CriminalShow. Sign up for Criminal Plus to get behind-the-scenes bonus episodes of Criminal, ad-free listening of all of our shows, members-only merch, and more. Learn more and sign up here. Listen back through our archives at youtube.com/criminalpodcast. We also make This is Love and Phoebe Reads a Mystery. Artwork by Julienne Alexander. Check out our online shop. Episode transcripts are posted on our website. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices
    Criminal
    enJune 14, 2024

    11 to 1

    11 to 1
    When JonRe Taylor was called for jury duty in 2007, she voted ‘not guilty’ on every charge. But the defendant was convicted and sent to prison anyway. Say hello on Twitter, Facebook and Instagram. Sign up for our occasional newsletter, The Accomplice. Follow the show and review us on Apple Podcasts: iTunes.com/CriminalShow. Sign up for Criminal Plus to get behind-the-scenes bonus episodes of Criminal, ad-free listening of all of our shows, members-only merch, and more. Learn more and sign up here. Listen back through our archives at youtube.com/criminalpodcast. We also make This is Love and Phoebe Reads a Mystery. Artwork by Julienne Alexander. Check out our online shop. Episode transcripts are posted on our website. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices
    Criminal
    enJune 07, 2024

    The Six

    The Six
    In 1989, three people confessed to participating in a murder. Eventually, a total of six people were arrested. But when DNA tests were run on crime scene evidence almost 20 years later - the results showed that none of them had been there at all. This episode picks up where our last episode left off. If you haven't heard the first part yet - we recommend going back and listening to that first. It’s called Type B. Say hello on Twitter, Facebook and Instagram. Sign up for our occasional newsletter, The Accomplice. Follow the show and review us on Apple Podcasts: iTunes.com/CriminalShow. Sign up for Criminal Plus to get behind-the-scenes bonus episodes of Criminal, ad-free listening of all of our shows, members-only merch, and more. Learn more and sign up here. Listen back through our archives at youtube.com/criminalpodcast. We also make This is Love and Phoebe Reads a Mystery. Artwork by Julienne Alexander. Check out our online shop. Episode transcripts are posted on our website. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices
    Criminal
    enMay 24, 2024

    Type B

    Type B
    Six people were arrested for a murder in Nebraska. Some said they couldn't remember details of the crime, or being there at all - but then they began to have dreams about it. Say hello on Twitter, Facebook and Instagram. Sign up for our occasional newsletter, The Accomplice. Follow the show and review us on Apple Podcasts: iTunes.com/CriminalShow. Sign up for Criminal Plus to get behind-the-scenes bonus episodes of Criminal, ad-free listening of all of our shows, members-only merch, and more. Learn more and sign up here. Listen back through our archives at youtube.com/criminalpodcast. We also make This is Love and Phoebe Reads a Mystery. Artwork by Julienne Alexander. Check out our online shop. Episode transcripts are posted on our website. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices
    Criminal
    enMay 17, 2024

    The Confession, Part 3

    The Confession, Part 3
    When we last spoke with Trevell Coleman, he was waiting to hear back about his clemency application. And then, in December of last year, his lawyer got a phone call. We shared Trevell’s story in two episodes we released last fall. They’re called The Confession Part 1 and 2. Say hello on Twitter, Facebook and Instagram. Sign up for our occasional newsletter, The Accomplice. Follow the show and review us on Apple Podcasts: iTunes.com/CriminalShow. Sign up for Criminal Plus to get behind-the-scenes bonus episodes of Criminal, ad-free listening of all of our shows, members-only merch, and more. Learn more and sign up here. Listen back through our archives at youtube.com/criminalpodcast. We also make This is Love and Phoebe Reads a Mystery. Artwork by Julienne Alexander. Check out our online shop. Episode transcripts are posted on our website. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

    Right of Way

    Right of Way
    In 1991, two police officers stopped Tupac Shakur for jaywalking. He said he was knocked unconscious during his arrest, and sued the city of Oakland for 10 million dollars. His lawyer says many of the police brutality cases he's worked on started with jaywalking stops. Peter Norton’s book is Fighting Traffic. Say hello on Twitter, Facebook and Instagram. Sign up for our occasional newsletter, The Accomplice. Follow the show and review us on Apple Podcasts: iTunes.com/CriminalShow. Sign up for Criminal Plus to get behind-the-scenes bonus episodes of Criminal, ad-free listening of all of our shows, members-only merch, and more. Learn more and sign up here. Listen back through our archives at youtube.com/criminalpodcast. We also make This is Love and Phoebe Reads a Mystery. Artwork by Julienne Alexander. Check out our online shop. Episode transcripts are posted on our website. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

    Mr. Apology

    Mr. Apology
    In 1980, posters appeared in subway stations and on telephone poles in New York City with a phone number to call. When you called it, you would hear a message: “This is Apology. Apology is not associated with the police or any other organization but rather is a way for you to tell people what you have done wrong and how you feel about it.” Say hello on Twitter, Facebook and Instagram. Sign up for our occasional newsletter, The Accomplice. Follow the show and review us on Apple Podcasts: iTunes.com/CriminalShow. Sign up for Criminal Plus to get behind-the-scenes bonus episodes of Criminal, ad-free listening of all of our shows, members-only merch, and more. Learn more and sign up here. Listen back through our archives at youtube.com/criminalpodcast. We also make This is Love and Phoebe Reads a Mystery. Artwork by Julienne Alexander. Check out our online shop. Episode transcripts are posted on our website. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

    Related Episodes

    #194 - A Real Life Halloween Monster in Sutherland, Nebraska

    #194 - A Real Life Halloween Monster in Sutherland, Nebraska

    This week, in Sutherland, Nebraska, where right before Halloween, a quiet, rural area is sent into a panic, when a news broadcast breaks in on the regularly scheduled show to tell residents to stay in their homes, lock their doors & load their guns, because there is a maniac on the loose! It turns out to be worse than anyone could've imagined, as the scene of the crime is as horrific as possible. Everyone finds out that monsters can be real!

    Along the way, we find out that you never know what's in someone's head, that the Sheriff shouldn't hang out with jurors, and that just when you think you've heard human nature hit rock bottom... this guy comes along!

    Hosted by James Pietragallo & Jimmie Whisman

    New episodes every Thursday!

    Donate at: patreon.com/crimeinsports or go to paypal.com & use our email: crimeinsports@gmail.com

    Go to shutupandgivememurder.com for all things Small Town Murder & Crime In Sports!

    Follow us on...

    twitter.com/@murdersmall

    facebook.com/smalltownpod

    instagram.com/smalltownmurder

    Also, check out James & Jimmie's other show, Crime In Sports! On iTunes, Stitcher, or wherever you listen to podcasts

    See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

    020: Social Trust Factor: Ignite Business Results with Authority and Trust

    020: Social Trust Factor: Ignite Business Results with Authority and Trust

    Many marketing and business leaders spend months developing an integrated online platform, brand architectures, message platforms, social media strategies and plans, logos, and more. They launch their business or new product with huge dreams to seriously rock the online world.

    However, after a few months goes by, they realize their platform is delivering little if any results. Their audience is not engaging, clicking, or buying. Instead of an engaging platform it look like a deserted island.

    So what is the problem? It could very well be they have a problem establishing trust. Does their audience trust them? If no, why not?

    Do you lack the trust factor? Establishing trust and authority are critical to achieve business results online.

    In this episode of the Social Zoom Factor podcast  Pam Moore, CEO and Founder, Marketing Nutz, full service social media, digital marketing, branding agency discusses why it is critical to turn up the volume on your social trust factor. I share 10 tips to help you establish trust, nurture relationships and grow your business the right way.

     

    Episode Highlights

    10 Tips establish trust and social business credibility

    How to establish authority

    Importance of authoring content

    Importance of social proof

    Connecting with your audience via content and conversation

    How to build an integrated online platform that nurtures relationships and invites conversation