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    The quest for a perfect smile

    enSeptember 16, 2023

    Podcast Summary

    • Uncovering the Drama Behind the Fashion IndustryThe 'Fashion People' podcast provides insights into the intriguing and complex world of fashion, offering listeners a deeper understanding of the industry and its key players.

      Behind the glamorous world of the multi-billion dollar fashion industry lies a complex web of intrigue and drama, as discussed in the new podcast "Fashion People." Hosted by Lauren Sherman, a 20-year fashion industry veteran, the podcast sheds light on the industry's inner workings, covering topics such as creative director changes, mergers and acquisitions, direct-to-consumer challenges, and Met Gala mishaps. The podcast, produced in partnership with Puck, is available on all major podcast platforms. During Make Me Smart's Friday episode, hosts Kyle Rosen and Kimberly Adams discussed the podcast and shared their own experiences with half-drunk glasses of water and the start of pumpkin spice season. While Kyle was sipping on water, he pondered the significance of "Fashion People" and the insights it offers into the fashion industry's behind-the-scenes happenings. The podcast serves as a reminder that even industries with significant public profiles and high-profile events have their fair share of drama and intrigue. By tuning in to "Fashion People," listeners can gain a deeper understanding of the fashion world and the people who shape it.

    • Exploring unique cocktail ingredientsDiscovered Saint Germain spiced rum, pomegranate juice, and balm in a cocktail. Learned about balm's medicinal properties and aroma. Discussed Oktoberfest beers, Ancho Margaritas, non-alcoholic tequila cocktails, and using herbs like lemon balm in drinks.

      The discussion revolved around creating unique cocktails and exploring various ingredients. The speaker shared her experience making a drink with Saint Germain spiced rum, pomegranate juice, and balm as a garnish. Balm, a type of herb, was a new discovery for some in the group, and its medicinal properties and pleasant aroma were highlighted. The conversation also included suggestions for different alcoholic and non-alcoholic beverages, such as Oktoberfest beers, Ancho Margaritas, and non-alcoholic tequila cocktails. The group also touched upon the use of herbs like Melissa officinalis, commonly known as lemon balm, to add flavor to cocktails and tea. Overall, the conversation showcased the creativity and enjoyment in experimenting with various ingredients to create delicious and unique drinks.

    • Fascination with the Roman Empire and societal pressureThe Roman Empire's enduring appeal and societal pressure to conform to unrealistic beauty standards are shaped by historical and media influences.

      Men seem to be fascinated with the Roman Empire, and this fascination is evident in various forms of media and social media platforms. This obsession with ancient Rome may be due to the numerous movies and shows that have been produced over the years, which have popularized the Roman era. The discussion also touched upon the concept of "bread and circuses," which refers to the ancient Roman practice of keeping the population contented by providing them with food and entertainment, allowing the government to maintain control. Another interesting topic that was discussed was the unrealistic beauty standards set by celebrities and their perfectly aligned, white teeth. The Washington Post story highlighted the significant amount of money and effort required to achieve such smiles, often involving veneers, which can be unhealthy for some individuals. This discussion underscored the impact of media and societal pressure on individuals to conform to unrealistic standards. Overall, these two stories shed light on how deeply ingrained historical and societal influences can be, shaping our perceptions and actions in various ways.

    • The pursuit of perfect smiles and status symbolsPeople invest thousands in cosmetic dental work for a perfect smile, seen as a status symbol, while the disappearance of G rated movies leaves some feeling disappointed, but the Birkenstock IPO offers potential excitement

      The obsession with perfect smiles in America can lead to significant financial investments, with some people spending tens of thousands of dollars on veneers and other cosmetic dental work. This trend has a historical precedent, with gold teeth and grills being popular in the past but presenting their own challenges. The perception of a perfect smile as a status symbol can also impact income and opportunities in society. In the news, we discussed the disappearance of G rated movies from mainstream cinema, leaving some feeling half empty about the lack of family-friendly options. On a brighter note, the Birkenstock IPO was seen as a potential source of excitement and financial gain by some, representing a half full perspective.

    • People have differing opinions on various topicsPeople have unique attitudes and emotions towards various topics, leading to lively debates and discussions.

      People have differing perspectives on various topics, from IPOs and fashion preferences to the effectiveness of over-the-counter medication and artificial intelligence. During our discussion, we touched upon Birkenstock's IPO, the debate over socks with sandals, a limited edition Coca-Cola can flavored with AI, and the FDA's announcement about an ineffective ingredient in many over-the-counter decongestants. Regarding Birkenstock, some were excited about the company's upcoming public offering and the potential for growth, while others, like myself, were less enthusiastic due to personal preferences. The socks-with-sandals trend sparked strong feelings, with some finding it amusing and others deeply bothered. The aluminum can infused with artificial intelligence flavors was met with skepticism and dismissal, while the potential use of AI in food production received a more optimistic response. In the case of over-the-counter decongestants, many people expressed frustration over the FDA's revelation that an ingredient in 80% of these products doesn't work, leading to questions about refunds and the effectiveness of these medications. Throughout our conversation, it became clear that people have varying attitudes and emotions towards various topics, and these differences can lead to lively debates and discussions. Ultimately, it's essential to approach these discussions with an open mind and a willingness to consider different perspectives.

    • The value and relevance of consumer productsPeople's personal experiences and needs impact the effectiveness and continued use of consumer products, such as Sudafed and Instant Pot.

      The effectiveness and necessity of certain products, like Sudafed and Instant Pot, can be debated. In the case of Sudafed, the removal of pseudoephedrine due to its association with meth production led to questions about its continued use for its intended purpose. Despite experts stating that it doesn't work, some people still find value in it due to personal health conditions. With Instant Pot, its popularity surged during the pandemic as people experimented with cooking at home. Once purchased, its durability and versatility make it a long-term investment, leading to a decrease in sales for the company. The Instant Pot's ability to cook various dishes, including rice, stews, yogurt, and stocks, makes it a valuable addition to many kitchens, even if not used for all those functions regularly. Overall, the discussion highlights the importance of personal experiences and needs in determining the value and relevance of consumer products.

    • Instant Pot: A Versatile Appliance with Mixed OpinionsThe Instant Pot, a multicooker appliance, is popular for its ability to cook various dishes but faces criticism for its large size and potential waste if not used frequently.

      The Instant Pot, a popular multicooker appliance, has gained widespread popularity due to its versatility in cooking various dishes, including beans, pasta, soups, and even homemade yogurt. However, some people expressed concerns about the amount of counter space and storage it requires, leading to mixed opinions on its value. The Instant Pot can replace several appliances, such as a pressure cooker, rice cooker, and slow cooker, but its large size and potential for contributing to waste if not used frequently were mentioned as drawbacks. The appliance was also compared to an air fryer, which is essentially a stovetop convection oven. Overall, the Instant Pot's environmental impact, both in terms of energy consumption and waste, was a topic of discussion. The poll results showed a slight majority (56%) leaning towards the idea that the Instant Pot's popularity is on the decline, while 43% held a more positive view.

    • The Team Behind Half Full, Half Empty PodcastThe podcast 'Sold A Story' focuses on literacy improvement and inspires change, with a team consisting of Emily McCune, Antoinette Brock, Marissa Cabrera, Bridget Bodner, Francesca Levy, Neil Farsha, Andy, and Drew Jostad.

      The team behind the game "Half Full, Half Empty," consisting of Emily McCune and Antoinette Brock, created theme music for the game with interns Neil Farsha, Andy, and Drew Jostad. Marissa Cabrera serves as the senior producer, Bridget Bodner is the director of podcast, and Francesca Levy is the executive director of digital and on-demand content. The podcast "Sold A Story" is releasing new episodes. Additionally, there is a renewed focus on literacy improvement in Wisconsin schools, with changes in teaching methods. This push for literacy comes as a result of recognizing past mistakes in literacy education, not just in Wisconsin but across the nation. The impact of this podcast is significant and timely, bringing attention to the importance of literacy and the need for continued improvement. Overall, the podcast's impact extends beyond entertainment, touching on important educational issues and inspiring change. Tune in for new episodes of "Sold A Story" to stay updated on these developments.

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