Logo
    Search

    Podcast Summary

    • Kellogg's Splits into Two Companies: Kelanova and WK KelloggKellogg's divides into two companies, focusing on cereals (Kelanova) and snacks (WK Kellogg), with the former targeting global growth in cereals and snacks, and the latter leveraging cereal brands domestically.

      Kellogg's is splitting into two independently traded companies, Kelanova and WK Kellogg, with the former keeping the international cereal business and the latter taking the cereal brands. This move is aimed at allowing the company to focus on different strategies for cereals and snacks, which are two distinct parts of its portfolio. The cereal industry, despite some concerns about saturation, remains a significant market with over $10 billion in domestic sales and remains the top breakfast choice for kids and the second for adults. The current CEO of Kellogg's will stay on as the chairman of Kelanova, and he sees significant growth opportunities in snacks and noodles, making Kelanova an exciting emerging brand with a global focus.

    • Kellogg's Snacks Business Drives GrowthKellogg focuses on its snacks segment, which accounts for 60% of revenue and includes five key brands. The company has successfully grown the Pringles business and explores ways to expand beyond cereal.

      Kellogg Company is focusing on growth opportunities within its portfolio, specifically the snacks business, which has seen impressive 9% annualized revenue growth over the last 3 years. The snacks segment represents 60% of the overall business, and 50% of that comes from five key brands: Pringles, Cheez Its, rice krispie treats, pop tarts, and Eggo. Kellogg has successfully grown the Pringles business since acquiring it in 2012, demonstrating the power of a diverse brand portfolio and global distribution. On the Kellogg side, Gary Pillnick, a long-time Kellogg veteran, will lead the company as it adopts a "117-year-old startup" mindset, focusing on innovation and looking toward the future. Despite the popularity and longevity of cereal, there is room for changes, and Kellogg is exploring ways to expand its brands beyond cereal and even view cereal as a snacking opportunity. Overall, Kellogg is positioning itself for growth by embracing new opportunities and maintaining a forward-thinking mindset.

    • Kellogg and Kelanova: Similar Spin-offs, Different Growth ProspectsKellogg's spin-off of its consumer brands presents similarities to Kelanova, but Kelanova's growth prospects in the snack sector make it more attractive to some investors. Innovation, health, and consumer preferences are key to success in the food industry.

      Both Kellogg and Kellogg's Nutra-Cereals (Kelanova) present investment opportunities, but the growth prospects for Kelanova, particularly in the snack sector, make it more attractive to some investors. The cereal industry is facing challenges related to health concerns, and brands like Kashi and Barenaked need to evolve to meet changing consumer preferences. The mechanics of Kellogg's recent spin-off of its consumer brands into Kellermeyer-Lewis Foods (Canvue) are similar to the potential separation of Kellogg and Kelanova, as both companies aim to focus on their respective core businesses. Food and consumer packaged goods may not be the most exciting investments, but the success of companies like Monster Energy Drinks shows that it's possible for a food or beverage product to become a "monster" business if it offers something new and unique to consumers. Ultimately, the key for success in the food industry is to focus on innovation, health, and consumer preferences.

    • Monster's success as a category creator in energy drinksMonster's success in energy drinks comes from creating a new category. However, to maintain its position, it may need to innovate or acquire.

      Monster Beverage's success can be attributed to its role as a category creator in the energy drink market. However, as competition increases, Monster may need to evolve by introducing new products or making acquisitions to maintain its position. The food industry presents unique challenges, and creating a new disruptive food category is a difficult task. While coffee and beverages are hard to disrupt, it's intriguing to consider the possibilities for iteration and evolution in the food and beverage market. A new lawsuit against TKO Holdings, a company formed by WWE and UFC, could potentially pose a significant challenge. Stay tuned for updates on these developments.

    • Merger of UFC and WWE into TKO Group under EndeavorInvestors excited about market power and brand name familiarity of UFC and WWE, Vince McMahon now oversees both companies through Endeavor merger, podcast provides communication skills tips to navigate important meetings and presentations

      The merger of UFC and WWE into the TKO Group under Endeavor is an exciting development for investors due to the dominant market power and brand name familiarity of both entities in their respective fields. The control of WWE has been taken away from Vince McMahon and given to him under Endeavor, making him the overseer of both companies. This merger came about after a potential expulsion of Vince McMahon from WWE was negotiated into a sale, which he then turned into a merger instead. The Think Fast, Talk Smart podcast, mentioned at the beginning, can help individuals improve their communication skills, a valuable asset in business and life, as they navigate important meetings and presentations. With experts sharing tips on managing anxiety, taking risks, and harnessing nervous energy, it's a worthwhile listen for anyone looking to enhance their communication abilities.

    • UFC's Fighter Pay vs Revenue GrowthDespite UFC's COO claiming faster fighter pay growth than revenue, evidence from the UFC's antitrust lawsuit shows otherwise, highlighting the need for transparency in corporate financial reporting.

      Despite Vince McMahon stepping back from his public-facing role in UFC following accusations, he still maintains significant control over the company, including its revenue distribution to fighters. During a CNBC interview, UFC's chief operating officer, Mark Shapiro, claimed that fighter pay has grown faster than overall UFC revenue. However, this contradicts previous reports and evidence from the UFC's antitrust lawsuit, which shows that fighter pay has not kept pace with revenue growth. In fact, the UFC's revenue explosion in 2005, which saw a significant decrease in fighter pay as a percentage of revenue, is the basis for Shapiro's claim. Additionally, at the time of this revenue growth, Endeavor, UFC's current parent company, had no ownership stake in the company. The discrepancy between Shapiro's statement and the evidence highlights the importance of transparency in corporate financial reporting.

    • Class certification win for UFC fightersFighters can collectively seek damages and injunctive relief against UFC for alleged suppressed pay and restrictive contracts

      The recent class certification in the Lee versus Zufa lawsuit against UFC is a significant victory for the fighters, as it allows them to collectively seek damages for alleged suppressed pay and restrictive contracts. This is a major hurdle in class action lawsuits, as it increases the potential damages and allows for injunctive relief that could force industry-wide changes. However, if the plaintiffs win a settlement, it may not fundamentally change the business of the new TKO Enterprise, as contracts have since changed and fighters now have arbitration clauses that limit their ability to take arguments to a jury trial.

    • Potential antitrust trial damages for UFC and industry implicationsA potential antitrust trial loss for UFC could result in significant damages and set a precedent, while a win could change the industry landscape by allowing fighters to negotiate with multiple promoters.

      The outcome of a potential antitrust trial against the UFC could result in significant damages for the company, estimated to be between 2.4 and 4.8 billion dollars if they lose. Additionally, a loss would set a precedent for future antitrust cases. The defendants have attempted to limit the number of plaintiffs by implementing arbitration agreements, but the plaintiffs plan to contest this in court. If successful, the plausible injunctive relief could change the industry landscape by allowing fighters to negotiate with multiple promoters and potentially earn more money. Regarding Dana White's Contender Series on ESPN+, the contracts for contestants include a $5,000 show fee and an additional $5,000 if they win, with a guaranteed $10,000 show purse and a $10,000 bonus for winning a UFC contract, typically a 4 or 5-fight deal.

    • UFC Fighters' Rights RelinquishmentUFC fighters surrender video game, image, and merchandise rights, impacting their earnings and personal brand control

      UFC fighters relinquish various rights, including video game, image, and merchandise rights, when they enter the competition. This means they give up a significant portion of their earnings and control over their personal brand. Our guest, John S. Nash, a mixed martial arts journalist at Bloody Elbow and host of the Hey, Not the Face podcast, discussed this topic with Pat Militich. Nash emphasized that the UFC's contracts contain these provisions, and fighters must accept them as part of their entry into the contender series. As always, it's essential to remember that program participants may have financial interests in the stocks discussed and that The Motley Fool may have formal recommendations. So, don't make investment decisions based solely on this program.

    Recent Episodes from Motley Fool Money

    "Two Things Can Be True"

    "Two Things Can Be True"
    The market may be overvalued, but some stocks are underpriced. (00:21) Tim Beyers and Mary Long talk about whether we’re in an AI bubble, lofty tech valuations, and what an unchecked Sam Altman might mean for the rest of us. Then, (17:28) Sanmeet Deo and Ricky Mulvey discuss energy drinks as investments, and whether Monster or Celsius deserves the title of top dog. Companies discussed: CRWD, PANW, MSFT, MNST, CELH Host: Mary Long Guests: Tim Beyers, Ricky Mulvey, Sanmeet Deo Engineers: Dan Boyd, Tim Sparks Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
    Motley Fool Money
    enJuly 10, 2024

    Paramount Has a Buyer

    Paramount Has a Buyer
    A couple of weeks ago, Skydance Media’s offer to buy Paramount looked like it was dead. Now, both companies have a joint press release announcing the deal. (00:21) Jason Moser and Ricky Mulvey discuss: - What Skydance Media is getting in the Paramount deal. - Why Netflix is winning the streaming wars. - Questions that investors should ask before putting money in a turnaround story. Then, (15:58) Alison Southwick and Brian Feroldi kick off their summer school series with a history class on markets. Companies discussed: PARA, NFLX, DIS, PYPL Learn more about the Range Rover Sport at www.landroverusa.com Host: Ricky Mulvey Guests: Jason Moser, Alison Southwick, Brian Feroldi Engineers: Dan Boyd, Desiree Jones David Ellison interview on “The Town”: https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/skydances-david-ellison-on-his-plans-for-paramount/id1612131897?i=1000661591016 Brian Feroldi’s newsletter: https://longtermmindset.co/newsletter/ Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
    Motley Fool Money
    enJuly 09, 2024

    Americans are Flying, Airline Stocks are Not

    Americans are Flying, Airline Stocks are Not
    (00:21) Asit Sharma and Dylan Lewis discuss: - How the airline industry’s focus on capacity and being able to supply more flights means fares are low, even in the face of record demand. - Eli Lilly’s $3.2B acquisition of Morphic, why it’s interested in the inflammatory bowel disease markets, and a few risks to keep in mind for the high-flying provider of weight-loss drugs. (14:39) Fool analyst Kirsten Guerra talks with Mary Long about her investing journey, and a career pivot that took her from rocks to stocks. Companies discussed: DAL, UAL, AAL, JBLU, LUV, LLY, MORF Host: Dylan Lewis Guests: Asit Sharma, Kirsten Guerra, Mary Long Producer: Ricky Mulvey Engineers: Dan Boyd Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
    Motley Fool Money
    enJuly 08, 2024

    Axios CEO on Media’s Existential Crisis, Entrepreneurship, and Luck

    Axios CEO on Media’s Existential Crisis, Entrepreneurship, and Luck
    What happens to a publisher when an AI personal assistant can just give you the news? Jim VandeHei is the CEO of Axios, the co-founder of Politico and the author of Just the Good Stuff. Mary Long caught up with VandeHei for a conversation about: The “aha” moment that created Politico. How AI changes our relationship with information. Practicing good times paranoia and bad times optimism. The case for teaching kids how to play poker. Companies mentioned: ABNB, JPM Host: Mary Long Guest: Jim VandeHei Producer: Ricky Mulvey  Engineers: Desiree Jones, Austin Morgan Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
    Motley Fool Money
    enJuly 07, 2024

    How US Presidents Manage Money

    How US Presidents Manage Money
    Reagan knew how to budget. Jefferson knew how to party. Megan Gorman is the author of the upcoming book, “All the Presidents' Money: How the Men Who Governed America Governed Their Money.” Gorman is also the founding partner of Chequers Financial Management Robert Brokamp caught up with Gorman for a conversation about: - What FDR, a “bit of a trust fund kid,” did if he needed money. - How Ronald Reagan’s humble beginnings impacted his finances. - Why a Great Depression president was a great investor. Host: Robert Brokamp  Guest: Megan Gorman Producer: Ricky Mulvey Engineer: Tim Sparks Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
    Motley Fool Money
    enJuly 06, 2024

    2024: Top-Heavy, AI-Fueled, Supply-Constrained

    2024: Top-Heavy, AI-Fueled, Supply-Constrained
    It’s our mid-year review show! We talk through the market’s strong start in 2024, how it’s being driven by the big names, and where the deals might be. (00:21) Jason Moser and Matt Argersinger discuss: - Why the market is up, but top-heavy in 2024, and the types of stocks currently trading at a discount to big tech. - Four defining themes of the year so far: AI, interest rates, next-gen tech, and the pivot to value for consumers.  - The state of real estate, and why low supply means prices may stay high in residential for a long time, even in spite of high rates. (19:11) Matt and Jason break down two stocks on their radar: ABM Industries and Rubrik. Stocks discussed: NVDA, MSFT, AAPL, ABM, RBRK Host: Dylan Lewis Guests: Jason Moser, Matt Argersinger Engineers: Dan Boyd Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
    Motley Fool Money
    enJuly 05, 2024

    What’s Upflation?

    What’s Upflation?
    I don’t know, what’s up with you? Jason Moser and Mary Long discuss Tesla’s delivery numbers, how personal care companies are dealing with declining sales, and a mattress merger that might not come to be. Read the Bloomberg article mentioned here. Companies discussed: TSLA, TPX Host: Mary Long Guest: Jason Moser Producer: Ricky Mulvey Engineer: Dan Boyd Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
    Motley Fool Money
    enJuly 03, 2024

    Chewy’s New Kitten

    Chewy’s New Kitten
    This investor is not a cat, though. Asit Sharma and Ricky Mulvey discuss Chewy becoming a meme stock, Cedar Fair and Six Flags merging into one company, and headlines from 2029. Companies discussed: CHWY, SIX, FUN, AMZN, WMT Host: Ricky Mulvey Guest: Asit Sharma Producer: Mary Long Engineer: Tim Sparks Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
    Motley Fool Money
    enJuly 02, 2024

    Canada's Market: Apathy Means Opportunity

    Canada's Market: Apathy Means Opportunity
    It’s Canada Day! We celebrate our neighbor to the north with a mid-year check on the state of Canada’s stock market.  (00:21) Jim Gillies and Dylan Lewis discuss: - How the TSX stacks up to the S&P 500 so far in 2024. - Why investor apathy in Canada is creating some low valuations and great buying opportunities. - Two Canadian stocks to watch: MTY Brands and Kit’s Eyewear Companies discussed: BMO, BNS, RY, ENB, SHOP, MTY, KITS Host: Dylan Lewis Guests: Jim Gillies Producer: Ricky Mulvey Engineers: Dan Boyd Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
    Motley Fool Money
    enJuly 01, 2024

    The Global Cold Rush

    The Global Cold Rush
    Nicola Twilley is the author of “Frostbite: How Refrigeration Changed Our Food, Our Planet, and Ourselves” and the co-host of Gastropod. Ricky Mulvey caught up with Twilley for a conversation about: - The cold chain and our economy. - Finding investment opportunities inside of refrigerators. - And one reason why Unilever gave up on ice cream. - A new technology changing how we eat fruits and vegetables. Companies mentioned: COLD, WMT, UL, YUMC Host: Ricky Mulvey Guest: Nicola Twilley Producer: Mary Long Engineers: Desiree Jones, Chace Pryzlepa Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
    Motley Fool Money
    enJune 30, 2024

    Related Episodes

    The Whisky Trust: Who Killed The Trust? (Part 3)

    The Whisky Trust: Who Killed The Trust? (Part 3)

    In the powerful conclusion to this story about Joseph Greenhut's Whisky Trust, an infernal instrument of death is set to be deployed at one of the Distillers and Cattle Feeders Company's greatest rival distilleries and the conspirators are brought before the court.

    And we find out why the Whisky Trust wasn't really a whisky trust after all. And later, we discover what happened to this powerful combination. Enjoy an extended part 3 of Whiskey Lore.

    Analyzing the FTC's Ban on Noncompete Agreements with Sandeep Vaheesan

    Analyzing the FTC's Ban on Noncompete Agreements with Sandeep Vaheesan

    The FTC recently proposed to ban noncompete agreements, and one of the most persistent advocates for this rule is Sandeep Vaheesan, legal director at the Open Markets Institute.

    Vaheesan leads Open Markets’ legal advocacy and research work, including its amicus program. Vaheesan works on a range of anti-monopoly topics, including antitrust law’s role in structuring labor markets and promoting fair competition. From 2015 to 2018, he served as a regulations counsel at the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau, where he helped develop rules on payday and title lending and debt collection practices. Before that, he worked at the American Antitrust Institute.

    Vaheesan’s writing has appeared in The Atlantic, Harvard Law & Policy Review, The New York Times, The Washington Post, and Yale Law Journal Forum. He has a forthcoming book titled Democracy in Power with the University of Chicago Press on the history of public and cooperative power in the United States and the lessons it offers for building a clean, publicly accountable electric industry today.

    Lose Weight - Application Security Weekly #52

    Lose Weight - Application Security Weekly #52

    This week, many websites threatened by highly critical code-execution bug in Drupal, UK parliament calls for antitrust, data abuse probe of Facebook, CommitStrip: Get rich quick, Google says the built-in microphone it never told Nest users about was 'never supposed to be a secret', and more! In our second segment, we welcome Matt Springfield, is the Founder of 12Feet, Inc., an information security consulting firm based in the Dallas area! Matt has more than 23 years of information security experience spanning operations, architecture and consulting with a focus on large scale retail and service provider environments!

     

    Full Show Notes: https://wiki.securityweekly.com/ASW_Episode52

    Visit https://www.securityweekly.com/asw for all the latest episodes!

     

    Visit our website: https://www.securityweekly.com

    Follow us on Twitter: https://www.twitter.com/securityweekly

    Like us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/secweekly

    Private Equity is Killing the American Economy, with Josh Kosman

    Private Equity is Killing the American Economy, with Josh Kosman

    Josh Kosman has been covering the financial industry for twenty-five years. He is a reporter for the New York Post, a former editor at Mergermarket.com and a former senior writer for The Deal and Buyouts Newsletter. 

    Josh also literally wrote the book on private equity – his The Buyout of America: How Private Equity is Destroying Jobs and Killing the American Economy, published in 2009, made a big political impact at the time, with Obama advisor David Axelrod reportedly using it as the basis for his attacks on Mitt Romney during the 2012 presidential campaign.

    Private equity and mergers. The FTC and DOJ are, according to Capitol Forum reporting, taking a harder stance on private equity firms as potential divestiture buyers for assets companies are proposing to sell in their attempts to cure anticompetitive mergers.

    Private equity and rising interest rates. Josh’s website details how “Moody’s in May 2020 reported that two-thirds of the companies with the lowest debt ratings” were private equity-owned. “Standard & Poor’s in February 2020 reported $1.5 trillion in speculative-grade US corporate debt matures through 2024…Roughly 60 percent of the money has been borrowed by private equity firm-owned companies. With interest rates rising this poses a big risk.” Josh adds.

    Private equity’s political power. Josh is also expert on private equity’s political influence, and has written about Senator Kyrsten Sinema’s (D-AZ) support for the industry and President Joe Biden’s ties to Carlyle Group Co-Founder David Rubenstein.

    The Biden Administration’s Changing Approaches to Antitrust in Health Care

    The Biden Administration’s Changing Approaches to Antitrust in Health Care

    Leslie Overton, Partner, Axinn Veltrop & Harkrider LLP, speaks with Peter Mucchetti, Partner, Clifford Chance US LLP, and Cagatay Koc, Managing Director, Secretariat Economists, about the Biden Administration’s changing approaches to antitrust in health care since the release of its July 2021 executive order on antitrust competition. They discuss the administration’s “all of government” policy approach to antitrust, recommendations for navigating merger reviews and antitrust investigations in the health care sector, considerations related to labor theories in the antitrust framework, and what to expect from revisions to the merger guidelines. Sponsored by Axinn.

    To learn more about AHLA and the educational resources available to the health law community, visit americanhealthlaw.org.