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    Podcast Summary

    • Unexpected challenges during planned events for people with Parkinson'sDespite tech failures or other unexpected setbacks, individuals with Parkinson's can adapt and continue with resilience and determination.

      Living with Parkinson's can present unexpected challenges, even during planned events. An unfortunate tech failure at a live event served as a reminder of the unpredictability of the condition. Despite the setback, the group was able to adapt and continue the discussion, demonstrating resilience and determination. Over the summer, Jillian wrote and put on a musical as an incredibly creative endeavor. The podcast episode will delve into the topic of technology and its role in managing Parkinson's, sharing insights and experiences from the community.

    • Creativity during Challenging TimesRetired judge shares how writing a book late at night boosted his creativity after starting dopamine agonists. Father with Parkinson's embraces permanent vacation. Retired judge looks forward to new experiences. Man tours country with one-man show, raises funds for local groups.

      Creativity can flourish in unexpected ways, even during challenging times. The speaker, who is a retired judge, shared his experience of writing a book about Lady Hamilton and Nelson after starting dopamine agonists, which are known to boost creativity. He wrote most of it late at night and found it flowing effortlessly. Meanwhile, the speaker's father, who has Parkinson's disease, has adopted an attitude of permanent vacation and enjoys life to the fullest. The judge himself has retired from the bench after a long career and is now looking forward to new experiences. Paul, another person in the conversation, has been touring the country with his one-man show and raising funds for local groups. These stories illustrate how creativity can emerge in various forms and how it can bring joy and fulfillment, especially during transitions and challenges.

    • Unexpected challenges of living with Parkinson'sAdvancements in Parkinson's research offer hope, but availability of new drugs can be frustrating due to prioritization and production issues.

      Living with Parkinson's disease comes with its challenges, both expected and unexpected. One unexpected challenge shared by the speaker was his embarrassing experience of melting milk chocolate in bed and then lying about it to his wife. On a more positive note, advancements in Parkinson's research include the development of an early detection method through an eye scan and promising trials of drugs like Exenatide. However, the availability of these drugs can be frustrating due to shortages and the prioritization of other drugs by pharmaceutical companies. The speaker also shared his personal experience of using Exenatide, which is a diabetic drug and has shown some improvement in his Parkinson's symptoms, but it is currently in shortage due to its status as a less popular diabetes drug and the production of a similar drug for weight loss. The unpredictability and complexity of the pharmaceutical industry add to the challenges faced by those living with Parkinson's.

    • Exploring Health Tech: Gadgets for Personal WellbeingDiscover how technology aids health monitoring through gadgets like sleep-analyzing rings and gait-tracking sensors. Despite costs and import duties, these devices offer valuable insights into personal health.

      Technology is being used in various ways to help individuals monitor and improve their health and wellbeing. The discussion revolved around several gadgets, including sensors for tracking gait, smart rings for sleep analysis, and even high-tech spectacles for maintaining balance. One speaker shared his skepticism about these devices but also acknowledged their potential benefits. He mentioned a gold ring called the Oura ring, which he purchased based on his daughter's recommendation. The ring, which comes from Holland, records daily activities and sleep patterns, offering valuable insights into one's health. However, the speaker noted the unexpected import duty charge and the high cost of the ring. Another topic touched upon was the use of technology to monitor sleep, with some expressing surprise at the discrepancy between perceived and actual sleep duration. The conversation also brought up the issue of Brexit and its potential impact on import duties. Overall, the discussion highlighted the role of technology in personal health management and the potential for improved understanding of one's health through the use of various gadgets.

    • Technology aids in managing Parkinson's disease with more accurate dataPD Monitor device collects comprehensive data on motor symptoms for better understanding and management of Parkinson's disease, offering insights into medication response and daily life adjustments.

      Technology is playing an increasingly important role in managing Parkinson's disease, with devices like PD Monitor from PD Neurotechnology providing more accurate and comprehensive data to help individuals and healthcare professionals better understand and manage symptoms. The PD Monitor device, which includes sensors on the wrist, ankle, and torso, collects data on motor symptoms such as bradykinesia, dyskinesia, on and off symptoms, and tremor. This information is then used to provide insights into how individuals are responding to medication and living with their symptoms on a day-to-day basis. The data collected over several days is more accurate than the snapshots provided during doctor visits and allows for a more nuanced understanding of how symptoms change throughout the day and in response to medication. For example, the data might reveal patterns related to medication timing or diet that can help individuals make adjustments to improve their overall quality of life. The Strolli headset, another technology mentioned in the discussion, also holds promise for helping individuals with mobility, balance, and cognitive issues using augmented reality. Overall, these technologies offer new opportunities for managing Parkinson's disease and improving the lives of those affected by it.

    • Using Technology to Monitor Parkinson's DiseasePatients use devices to measure vital signs, send data to doctors for analysis, and inform medication dosage based on food intake. Consistent usage is crucial for accurate patterns. Doctors generate reports for consultations, and technology uncovers invisible symptoms, enhancing care.

      Technology is playing an increasingly important role in managing and monitoring Parkinson's disease. A patient shares his experience of using a device that measures vital signs and sends the data to the cloud for analysis. The device helps the doctor make informed decisions about medication dosage by observing the impact of food on drug absorption. The patient, who has to wear the device for continuous monitoring to see patterns, emphasizes the need for a consistent usage period. The recruitment of patients for such studies is enthusiastic, as they desire to be better informed and feel under-served by the current healthcare system. The doctors generate reports from the data, which are often discussed during consultants' meetings, ensuring their involvement. The Parkinson's iceberg metaphor illustrates that only a small portion of the symptoms are visible, and technology can help uncover the invisible symptoms, improving overall care and decision-making.

    • Exploring Technologies for Monitoring Parkinson's Symptoms Beyond SleepInitiatives like ParkTech test and review technologies for monitoring Parkinson's symptoms, wearable devices in clinical trials help smooth out response variability, but approval process can delay progress.

      While there are various technologies available for monitoring Parkinson's symptoms beyond sleep, the landscape can be confusing. However, initiatives like ParkTech, a new platform by Parkinson's UK, aim to test and review these technologies for their use and effectiveness. One promising area is the use of wearable devices in clinical trials, which can help smooth out variability in response to treatments and provide clearer data. Unfortunately, the approval process for using these devices in clinical trials can be lengthy and may delay the progress of potential treatments. Overall, the use of technology in monitoring and managing Parkinson's symptoms is still in its early stages, but holds great potential for improving the efficiency and accuracy of diagnosis and treatment.

    • Digital devices in clinical trials for Parkinson's diseaseDigital devices like apps can improve clinical trials for Parkinson's disease by collecting real-time data, reducing trial length and frequency of patient visits. However, regulatory approval and participant recruitment remain challenges.

      Digital devices, such as apps, are becoming increasingly sensitive and useful in clinical trials for conditions like Parkinson's disease. These devices can help collect real-time data, allowing for shorter and fewer patient trials. However, getting these devices approved by regulatory bodies like the MHRA can be a challenge due to current delays and underfunding. Recruiting participants for trials is also a struggle due to mistrust and lack of awareness. Professor Chaudhry is developing an app that allows patients to record symptoms on an ordinary smartphone, which could lead to more frequent consultations with neurologists and quicker intervention for non-motor symptoms. Despite the potential benefits, there are concerns about the frequency of data input and the need for patient engagement. Overall, while digital devices hold great promise for improving clinical trials and patient care, there are challenges that need to be addressed to fully realize their potential.

    • Distinguishing Effective Devices for Parkinson's ManagementRigorous trials with placebo controls are necessary to determine which devices effectively manage Parkinson's symptoms for individuals, separating the beneficial gadgets from the expensive cons.

      While there are various technological devices available for managing Parkinson's symptoms, such as the Q1 device and smart glasses, their effectiveness varies greatly from person to person. Some people report significant improvements, while others, like the speaker, have not experienced any benefit. Therefore, it's crucial to conduct rigorous trials with placebo controls to distinguish between what works and what doesn't. Queuing devices, which act as reminders to swallow, have shown some positive effects. However, it's essential to separate the effective gadgets from the cons, especially since these devices can be expensive. Overall, the goal is to help individuals with Parkinson's break free from their "automatic pilot" phase and improve their safety and mobility.

    • Exploring alternative ways to manage Parkinson's symptomsEngage in research, utilize assistive devices, join local opportunities, adapt technologies, and share experiences to effectively manage Parkinson's symptoms beyond medical treatments.

      There are various ways to help manage the symptoms of Parkinson's disease beyond medical treatments. These methods include using queuing devices to break the monotony of daily routines, participating in technological research and trials, and utilizing assistive devices for everyday tasks. The Parkinson's UK website's "Take Part Hub" is a great resource for finding local opportunities to get involved. Additionally, sharing personal experiences and encouraging others to participate can make a significant difference. It's also important to consider adapting older technologies to accommodate the needs of those with Parkinson's. For instance, larger buttons on phones or devices to help with pill organization and key access can be beneficial. And yes, there might even be a device to help put your trousers on! Remember, every little bit helps, and your voice and experiences can make a difference. So, let's keep the conversation going and explore these possibilities together.

    Recent Episodes from Movers and Shakers: a podcast about life with Parkinson's

    Parky Profiles: Kevin Cahill

    Parky Profiles: Kevin Cahill

    For the next in our series of profiles of fascinating folk with Parkinson's, Paul introduces the gang to Kevin Cahill. For decades, Kevin was the Chief Executive of Comic Relief, a role that entitled him dubious honours, like employing Paul to write University Challenge sketches, and convincing Billy Connolly to run round Trafalgar Square in nothing but his God-given fatigues. Kevin joins the Movers and Shakers in the Notting Hill pub to discuss his life, career, and journey with Parkinson's.


    Presented by Rory Cellan-Jones, Gillian Lacey-Solymar, Mark Mardell, Paul Mayhew-Archer, Sir Nicholas Mostyn and Jeremy Paxman.

    Produced and edited by Nick Hilton for Podot.

    Additional production by Ewan Cameron.

    Music by Alex Stobbs.

    Artwork by Till Lukat.

    PR by Sally Jones.


    For more additional information about the show, as well as extra resources and exclusive content, please visit MOVERSANDSHAKERSPODCAST.COM



    Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.


    Parky Profiles: Paul Sinha

    Parky Profiles: Paul Sinha

    In the pub this week, for the latest instalment of our Parky Profiles series, is none other than Paul Sinha: qualified doctor, award-winning comedian, professional Chaser. Paul's journey through Parkinson's hasn't been without its difficulties – to compound things, he had a heart attack at the Edinburgh festival – but over a Diet Coke in the Notting Hill pub, Paul shares his wit and wisdom on living, and thriving, with Parkinson's.


    Presented by Rory Cellan-Jones, Gillian Lacey-Solymar, Mark Mardell, Paul Mayhew-Archer, Sir Nicholas Mostyn and Jeremy Paxman.

    Produced and edited by Nick Hilton for Podot.

    Additional production by Ewan Cameron.

    Music by Alex Stobbs.

    Artwork by Till Lukat.

    PR by Sally Jones.


    For more additional information about the show, as well as extra resources and exclusive content, please visit MOVERSANDSHAKERSPODCAST.COM



    Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.


    BONUS: Parky Politics (Not) in the Pub – Victoria Atkins

    BONUS: Parky Politics (Not) in the Pub – Victoria Atkins

    On this bonus election episode of the podcast (don't worry, the politics is over and our Parky Profile series will resume on Saturday!) we're speaking to Victoria Atkins, the current Secretary of State for Health and Social Care. We discuss the impact that the Conservatives are having on the backlog in the health service, the future for neurological provision, and what she can – and can't – promise when it comes to the Parky Charter.


    Presented by Rory Cellan-Jones, Gillian Lacey-Solymar, Mark Mardell, Paul Mayhew-Archer, Sir Nicholas Mostyn and Jeremy Paxman.

    Produced and edited by Nick Hilton for Podot.

    Additional production by Ewan Cameron.

    Music by Alex Stobbs.

    Artwork by Till Lukat.

    PR by Sally Jones.


    For more additional information about the show, as well as extra resources and exclusive content, please visit MOVERSANDSHAKERSPODCAST.COM



    Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.


    Parky Politics in the Pub – with Wes Streeting

    Parky Politics in the Pub – with Wes Streeting

    In just a couple of weeks, Wes Streeting may find himself the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care. If that wasn't a sufficiently daunting proposition, this week he finds himself at the Notting Hill pub surrounded by our group of militant Parkies! What does Streeting make of the Parky Charter? Will he promise an influx of new neurologists? And how will he prevent the NHS succumbing to sclerosis? On this special election edition of Movers and Shakers, the gang put the prospective Health Secretary through his paces!


    Presented by Rory Cellan-Jones, Gillian Lacey-Solymar, Mark Mardell, Paul Mayhew-Archer, Sir Nicholas Mostyn and Jeremy Paxman.

    Produced and edited by Nick Hilton for Podot.

    Additional production by Ewan Cameron.

    Music by Alex Stobbs.

    Artwork by Till Lukat.

    PR by Sally Jones.


    For more additional information about the show, as well as extra resources and exclusive content, please visit MOVERSANDSHAKERSPODCAST.COM



    Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.


    Parky Profiles: Susie Sainsbury

    Parky Profiles: Susie Sainsbury

    For the second instalment of our summer series profiling extraordinary people with Parkinson's, the gang are joined in the Notting Hill pub by Dame Susie Sainsbury. A note philanthropist and patron of the arts, Susie has spent decades living with PD. But what caused her to spend 3 years keeping the diagnosis totally secret, even from her husband, former Science Minister David Sainsbury? And how does she now find herself involved with an experimental programme building bridges between the Netherlands and, er, Bristol?


    Presented by Rory Cellan-Jones, Gillian Lacey-Solymar, Mark Mardell, Paul Mayhew-Archer, Sir Nicholas Mostyn and Jeremy Paxman.

    Produced and edited by Nick Hilton for Podot.

    Additional production by Ewan Cameron.

    Music by Alex Stobbs.

    Artwork by Till Lukat.

    PR by Sally Jones.


    For more additional information about the show, as well as extra resources and exclusive content, please visit MOVERSANDSHAKERSPODCAST.COM



    Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.


    Parky Profiles: Guy Deacon

    Parky Profiles: Guy Deacon

    This week, we're kicking off our summer mini-series, profiling top Parkies who are leading extraordinary lives despite – or because of – the condition. First up: Guy Deacon. Guy has driven from Morocco to South Africa in a VW Camper Van since his diagnoses, which makes him a perfect person to pontificate on how to take big, adventurous risks when living with the illness.


    Presented by Rory Cellan-Jones, Gillian Lacey-Solymar, Mark Mardell, Paul Mayhew-Archer, Sir Nicholas Mostyn and Jeremy Paxman.

    Produced and edited by Nick Hilton for Podot.

    Additional production by Ewan Cameron.

    Music by Alex Stobbs.

    Artwork by Till Lukat.

    PR by Sally Jones.


    For more additional information about the show, as well as extra resources and exclusive content, please visit MOVERSANDSHAKERSPODCAST.COM



    Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.


    Mailbag #3

    Mailbag #3

    It's the season finale of Movers and Shakers, which means that it's time to answer some of your letters. From discussion about the Charter to playing walking football at the Emirates, this is a diverse mailbag that captures the wit and wisdom of the Movers and Shakers community. And then, at the end of the episode, we have a little treat: music extracted from Parky tremors!


    Presented by Rory Cellan-Jones, Gillian Lacey-Solymar, Mark Mardell, Paul Mayhew-Archer, Sir Nicholas Mostyn and Jeremy Paxman.

    Produced and edited by Nick Hilton for Podot.

    Additional production by Ewan Cameron.

    Music by Alex Stobbs.

    Artwork by Till Lukat.

    PR by Sally Jones.


    For more additional information about the show, as well as extra resources and exclusive content, please visit MOVERSANDSHAKERSPODCAST.COM



    Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.


    Cell Therapy

    Cell Therapy

    From levodopa to Deep Brain Stimulation (DBS) we're all pretty familiar with the treatments for Parkinson's. But could there be something, just around the corner, that could change the whole game, not just stalling but reversing the tide of symptoms? That's the subject the Movers and Shakers are discussing today as they gather in the Notting Hill pub with special guest Professor Roger Barker, a world-leading expert on the application of stem cells as a potentially revolutionary treatment for Parkinson's.


    Presented by Rory Cellan-Jones, Gillian Lacey-Solymar, Mark Mardell, Paul Mayhew-Archer, Sir Nicholas Mostyn and Jeremy Paxman.

    Produced and edited by Nick Hilton for Podot.

    Additional production by Ewan Cameron.

    Music by Alex Stobbs.

    Artwork by Till Lukat.

    PR by Sally Jones.


    For more additional information about the show, as well as extra resources and exclusive content, please visit MOVERSANDSHAKERSPODCAST.COM



    Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.


    What Causes Parkinson's?

    What Causes Parkinson's?

    What causes Parkinson's? This is one of the trickiest questions facing researchers and doctors – not to mention patients – and it's the topic being tackled by the Movers and Shakers as they take to the Notting Hill pub today. Is there something atmospheric? Or does the club lie in our DNA? Our guide through this topic is Professor Matt Farrer, one of the leading lights of this research area.


    Presented by Rory Cellan-Jones, Gillian Lacey-Solymar, Mark Mardell, Paul Mayhew-Archer, Sir Nicholas Mostyn and Jeremy Paxman.

    Produced and edited by Nick Hilton for Podot.

    Additional production by Ewan Cameron.

    Music by Alex Stobbs.

    Artwork by Till Lukat.

    PR by Sally Jones.


    For more additional information about the show, as well as extra resources and exclusive content, please visit MOVERSANDSHAKERSPODCAST.COM



    Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.


    The Movers & Shakers Take Downing Street!

    The Movers & Shakers Take Downing Street!

    This week we have a very special episode of Movers and Shakers: live from Downing Street! On World Parkinson's Day, the Movers and Shakers, along with representatives from Parkinson's UK, Cure Parkinson's and Spotlight YOPD took to the streets of Westminster to hand over the #ParkyCharter, a list of 5 demands (well, polite requests) to government. Join Rory, Gillian, Mark, Paul, Nick and Jeremy in that experience, and listen to the testimonies of the many listeners to the show who made the trip down to SW1A to show their support.


    Presented by Rory Cellan-Jones, Gillian Lacey-Solymar, Mark Mardell, Paul Mayhew-Archer, Sir Nicholas Mostyn and Jeremy Paxman.

    Produced and edited by Nick Hilton for Podot.

    Additional production by Ewan Cameron.

    Music by Alex Stobbs.

    Artwork by Till Lukat.

    PR by Sally Jones.


    For more additional information about the show, as well as extra resources and exclusive content, please visit MOVERSANDSHAKERSPODCAST.COM



    Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.


    Related Episodes

    Eva Castro

    Eva Castro
    We talk to Eva Castro, who with her fascinating lab, Formaxioms, found in 2019, part of a cluster of SUTD, Singapore University of Technology and Design and ASD, Architecture and Sustainable Design, intents to promote and deepen research on speculative narratives through the exploration of artificial realities, VR/AR, computational and advance technologies. The work she is carrying out with her students, focuses on the ecology of liquid territories, reimagining new realities for 'post', 'trans', 'hyper' anthropocentric scenarios to address the future rising ocean level along the coastal areas of the South China Sea. Her ideas are always projected into the future, utilizing the aid of the digital crafts, she challenges conventional topographies, spatial codes and infrastructures forms, to propose new models and methodologies to shape new-natures or alternatives styles of life. Attesting to forward thinking, her latest installation created for the Singapore National Gallery, launched as a prototypical platform Negentropic fields, in collaborations with a really wide ranges of different artists, intends to consider both Virtual and Augmented realities and environments that go beyond the limitations of a merely representational tools, realizing new hybrid spatial experiences.

    Dhar Mann Studios: Dhar Mann

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    Five years before he became a massively successful content creator, Dhar Mann was nearly broke and living in a studio apartment. It’s the kind of story he might tell in one of his videos: bite-sized, live-action morality tales that have earned 60 billion views across YouTube, Facebook, and other platforms. Raised in an Indian Sikh family, Dhar had a strong entrepreneurial drive, which led to early business success, but also a spectacular downfall when he got pulled into a Ponzi scheme. A few years after losing nearly everything, he began making short, dramatic videos that conveyed life lessons. Nobody watched at first and critics called them cheesy, but today, Dhar has a huge production studio in Burbank, where dozens of  employees make content for tens of millions of subscribers.


    This episode was produced by Alex Cheng and Casey Herman, with music by Ramtin Arablouei.

    Edited by Neva Grant, with research help from Katherine Sypher.


    You can follow HIBT on X & Instagram, and email us at hibt@id.wondery.com.

    See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

    Rent The Runway: Jenn Hyman

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    Jenn Hyman got the idea for Rent the Runway in 2008, after she watched her sister overspend on a new dress rather than wear an old one to a party. Jenn and her business partner built a web site where women could rent designer dresses for a fraction of the retail price. As the company grew, they dealt with problems that many female entrepreneurs face, including patronizing investors and sexual harassment. Despite these challenges, Rent The Runway now rents dresses to nearly six million women and has an annual revenue of $100 million. PLUS in our postscript "How You Built That," how Dustin Hogard and his business partner designed a survival belt that's full of tiny gadgets and thin enough to wear every day. See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

    No bobble was strong enough to contain the Garvey locks!

    No bobble was strong enough to contain the Garvey locks!

    Jane and Fi are gearing up to turn their 'out of office' on but they've still got a show to do! They reveal who will be replacing them in their respective absences as well as discussing unhelpful cesarean partners, tea cakes and jet lag.


    Plus, they're joined by Darryn Frost AKA 'Narwhal Tusk Hero'. Darryn risked his life to tackle a terrorist on London Bridge in November 2019. He shares his story...


    Follow us on Instagram! @janeandfi


    If you want to contact the show to ask a question and get involved in the conversation then please email us: janeandfi@times.radio


    Assistant Producer: Eve Salusbury


    Times Radio Producer: Rosie Cutler





    Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.


    Talking Dateline: Ghosts Can’t Talk

    Talking Dateline: Ghosts Can’t Talk

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