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    • The Legacy of Standard Oil and Efficient Back-Office OperationsThe history of Standard Oil highlights the formation of industrial capitalism in America, while the rise of FinTech and cloud-based technology enables startups like Pilot.com to offer efficient back-office solutions for businesses, including tax prep and bookkeeping services.

      Standard Oil was the oil monopoly founded by John D. Rockefeller in the 1870s, which became the backbone of the modern energy industry. Despite being broken up into several different companies, the remnants of Standard Oil can still be seen in major gas stations today. The history of Standard Oil is essential in understanding how industrial capitalism was formed in America and how businesses were run during the late 19th century. Furthermore, the rise of FinTech, SaaS, and cloud-based technology, and the shift in consumer behavior, has enabled startups to outsource their financial operations, making back-office operations more efficient and feasible. Pilot.com is a leader in this technology and offers assistance in tax prep and bookkeeping services.

    • John D. Rockefeller's Family Background and ValuesJohn D. Rockefeller developed his own set of values, mixing both his mother's and father's family's values. His love for money was different from his father's and was influenced by the Baptist philosophy of gaining influence and followers.

      John D. Rockefeller grew up in a time when the US was still in its early stages of human organization. His family background was a mix of upstanding and wealthy on his mother's side and snake-oil salesman on his father's side. Despite this, he developed a detestation for shows of wealth, which was different from his father's love for cash and his habit of flaunting it. Young John was impressionable and looked up to his father, but as an adult, he charted his own path, mixing his mother's side of the family's values with those of his father's. The Baptists, who were on John's maternal side, shared the same love for money, but for a different reason - to gain more influence and followers.

    • John D. Rockefeller's Philosophy of Wealth and PhilanthropyRockefeller's belief in using his gift of making money for philanthropic causes inspires us to strive for excellence in both financial success and giving back, regardless of our starting point or background.

      John D. Rockefeller believed that making money was a gift from God, and he felt it was his duty to use this gift to accumulate as much wealth as possible to be philanthropic. He recognized the intertwined nature of making money and philanthropy and strived to excel in both areas. When faced with the responsibility of supporting his family at just 16 years old, he turned to bookkeeping as his path to success. His affinity for accounting and unwavering dedication to making money led him to become one of the wealthiest businessmen in history, and he celebrated the day he got his first job as a holy event. Rockefeller's devotion to numbers and accumulating wealth is similar to Warren Buffett's financial philosophy, making this trait timeless and universal.

    • John D. Rockefeller's Success Story from a Little Kid to an Oil Tycoon.Rockefeller's success was built on his ability to adapt to changing market conditions and his willingness to take risks in expanding his business into new industries.

      John D. Rockefeller started as a little kid working at a merchant trading firm called Hewitt and Tuttle which was specialized in trading produce commodities from farms into cities. In 1858, he founded a new merchant firm called Clark Rockefeller with Maurice Clark based on similar trade. The Civil War created an ample opportunity for the business as commodity prices, specifically foodstuffs, went up driving profits. With the war-driven profits, they expanded their business into oil, starting to drill in the Titusville area of Western Pennsylvania where most of the oil in the world came from. The industry went through a rough refining process which they tackled using sulfuric acid. The Civil War resulted in a boon for John D. Rockefeller's business.

    • The Rise of the Oil Industry through Refining Crude Oil for KeroseneThe discovery of refining crude oil for kerosene led to the rise of the oil industry, which was strategically located to access transportation infrastructure. The industry grew with the demand for kerosene during the Civil War and industrialization, paving the way for the modern oil industry we have today.

      The discovery of refining crude oil for kerosene brought about the rise of the oil industry, as kerosene replaced whale oil as a cheaper and more plentiful source of light. The refining process required scientific knowledge, which eventually led to the investment in a refinery by Rockefeller and Clark. The location of the refinery was strategically chosen to have access to the Cuyahoga River and new rail lines going into Cleveland. The demand for kerosene increased with the Civil War and industrialization, making it a commodity for commerce and industry. This new industry paved the way for the rise of Standard Oil and the modern oil industry we know today.

    • Rockefeller's Visionary Approach to Oil RefineryBy focusing on long-term sustainable growth, strategic planning, and innovation, Rockefeller was able to become the sole supplier of oil to the world and go beyond just making a profit in his industry.

      Rockefeller was a visionary who focused on optimizing and innovating the oil refinery process, both vertically and horizontally integrating to increase profitability and efficiency. He was obsessed with long-term, sustainable growth, and reinvested profits into R&D, CapEx, and inventory. He was strategic in his goal to become the sole supplier of oil to the world and owned super strategic chokepoints of refining in cities. His competitors were focused on short-term gains, resulting in huge gyrations in prices. Rockefeller's divine passion for his business led him to engineer a coup against his partner, who was not aligned with his vision for growth. He was a true innovator in his industry and went beyond just making a profit.

    • How Rockefeller's Strategic Decisions Led to Standard Oil's DominanceBy prioritizing reliability and strategic planning over speculation, Rockefeller was able to establish Standard Oil as the leader in the oil industry. His calculated decisions played a crucial role in his success.

      Rockefeller strategically dissolved his partnership with the Clark brothers and won a bidding war for their 50% stake in the business, giving him complete control of the oil industry. He focused on setting industry standards for kerosene refining and production, using gasoline byproducts to fuel his factories. By observing and avoiding the volatility of the oil speculation market, he built a reliable and strategic value chain that would dominate the post-war industrial boom. This led to Standard Oil becoming the undisputed king of the oil industry, with Rockefeller's calm and calculated decision-making playing a pivotal role in his success.

    • Standard Oil's Overseas Sales Strategy and Railroad Negotiations.Standard Oil achieved immense success by guaranteeing minimum shipments with unbelievable shipping rates with the help of wealthy investors, similar to Uber's playbook, while maintaining plausible deniability as their lieutenants did the dirty work.

      Standard Oil sold a vast majority of their kerosene overseas primarily to Europe while only one-third domestically. Standard Oil used their power and influence to negotiate with the railroads and get good shipping rates. Their tactic was to guarantee a large amount of minimum shipments in exchange for an equally unbelievable shipping rate. This helped the company achieve immense success, and their tactics resemble the Uber playbook of raising a lot of capital and 'flatten' the competition. The story also emphasizes the importance of having wealthy investors who can help elevate a business to generational wealth. Rockefeller was careful to maintain plausible deniability while driving the company, and his lieutenants did the dirty work.

    • How Standard Oil revolutionized the oil industry by negotiating a great shipping rate and using a new structure to consolidate the industry.Standard Oil's success in revolutionizing the oil industry through innovative shipping rates and a joint-stock company structure led to the birth of modern corporate law and incorporation.

      Standard Oil, led by Rockefeller and Flagler, revolutionized the oil industry by negotiating a great shipping rate, the Lakeshore Agreement, with railroads to transport oil in dedicated lines of tanks. This minimized costs and allowed for rapid expansion in refining. To consolidate the industry and operate outside the borders of Ohio, they came up with a new structure, a joint-stock company, enabling them to raise capital and invest in other states. Their success in Cleveland made them the Godfather of the oil industry. This innovation led to the birth of modern corporate law and incorporation. Their journey sheds light on the evolution of business and regulatory environments in America.

    • The Birth of Standard Oil Company of Ohio and the Trust SolutionThe trust solution allowed shareholders to benefit from combined ownership in multiple companies, setting the standard for equity and dividends as a primary source of income and wealth generation.

      The Standard Oil Company of Ohio was born as a joint-stock corporation worth $1 million and used the trust to solve the interstate commerce issue. They created a trust that held shares in companies all around the country, and this way, the trustees could dictate the direction of the other companies they purchased and all the dividends would go to the individual shareholders. This set the standard for how equity and dividend could be an individual's primary source of income and wealth generation. The idea was to incentivize people, partners, and companies by offering them ownership in the joint combined company where, as the industry grew, everyone would win by holding shares of this thing together.

    • Standard Oil's Control of the Oil Industry and RailroadsStandard Oil's creation of the South Improvement Company allowed them to control prices and offer special discounts, giving them immense power over the oil industry and railroads, which ultimately led to their monopoly.

      Standard Oil, through their trust and joint-stock corporation structure, set up the South Improvement Company with the three biggest railroads to solve the fluctuating prices problem. They fixed the prices and set a new fixed price for shipping oil on railroads to everybody. Anybody shipping oil gets one single fixed high price, except for the members of the South Improvement Company who get a 50% discount. This is one of the several good and bad things happened in this story. PitchBook is a leading financial data provider with data on private companies in the world and a vast number of clients rated PitchBook's coverage of private companies better than any other data provider.

    • Standard Oil's Unethical Practices and Monopoly in the Oil IndustryStandard Oil's unfair tactics, such as forming a little cartel and forcing smaller businesses to sell at undervalued prices, resulted in absolute control of the industry and public backlash.

      Standard Oil created a monopoly in the oil industry through various unethical practices, including forming a 'little cartel' that offered rebates and drawbacks to its members while excluding non-members. This led to an absolute control of the oil business by Standard Oil, leaving no chance for anyone outside the industry. Standard Oil used its power to force smaller refiners out of business or to join the company, offering them stock or cash for their properties at a fraction of their actual value. This unethical behavior led to public opinion turning against Standard Oil, and even riots breaking out once word got out about their shady practices.

    • The ruthless tactics of Standard Oil in consolidating the oil industryStandard Oil's strategy of upgrading the product while lowering costs and dominating the means of transportation helped them achieve a near-monopoly status, facilitating their expansion and dominance in the oil industry.

      Standard Oil's strategy for consolidating the oil business was to continuously upgrade the product while lowering costs to increase sales and frighten away potential competitors. They also co-opted the railroad industry by leasing tank cars to them, making their position unassailable. Standard Oil's goal was not just to control the oil business but also the means of transportation, ensuring the most favorable rates without a railroad going out of business. This eventually allowed them to expand production even further. Even though their tactics were ruthless and sometimes illegal, their impact on American history cannot be dismissed.

    • Standard Oil's Domination of the Oil Industry in the Late 1800sStandard Oil used long-distance pipelines, owned by railroads, to dominate the oil industry by controlling shipping rates. Their strategy was to be a benevolent dictator and co-opt new technologies, resulting in complete domination and a solidified monopoly.

      Standard Oil's domination of the oil industry in the late 1800s was aided by the development of long-distance pipelines, which they ultimately controlled after bankrupting the Tidewater Pipeline Company. The pipelines were built on land owned by railroads and Standard Oil used this to their advantage by lowering shipping rates on the rail line, making it more economical than the pipeline. Standard Oil's strategy was to be a benevolent dictator and let their competitors continue to operate, but always with the reminder that they controlled the industry. They also co-opted new upstart technologies and reduced all suppliers to lackeys, resulting in their complete domination of the oil industry. Additionally, they used their power to influence grocery stores to only carry Standard Oil kerosene, further solidifying their monopoly.

    • The Rise and Fall of Standard Oil: Disruption and Political InfluenceNo matter how powerful and successful a monopoly may seem, they are always at risk of being disrupted by technological shifts, and the importance of staying ahead of these changes cannot be overstated. Political influence and lobbying can also play a significant role in the fate of companies, as seen in the downfall of Standard Oil.

      The story of Standard Oil shows that even the biggest and most successful monopolies are always at risk of being disrupted by a paradigm shift. Although Standard Oil eventually faced government regulation with the Sherman Antitrust Act in 1911, it was the growth of the automobile industry and the shift to gasoline that truly disrupted their core kerosene business. Despite their dominance, even Standard Oil made investments in electricity and electrical utilities, demonstrating the importance of staying ahead of changing technologies. The story also highlights the power of political influence and lobbying, as Ohio Senator John Sherman, who had previously received support from Rockefeller, proposed the Antitrust Bill that eventually brought down Standard Oil.

    • The Sherman Antitrust Act and Its Impact on Standard OilThe Sherman Antitrust Act outlawed all trusts and business combinations in the US but a lack of clear definitions allowed Standard Oil to continue operating as before, leading to public distrust of monopolies and centralized power.

      The Sherman Antitrust Act passed in 1890 outlawing all trusts and business combinations in the United States in restraint of trade. However, there was no clear definition of in restraint of trade, leaving it to judges to set precedents. Rockefeller and Standard Oil viewed it as a win because it gave the public the impression that the government had curtailed their power, but in reality, they continued to operate as before. Rockefeller continued to be a big donor to the senator who introduced the act. There was significant public sentiment against Standard Oil by competitors, but not the general public who benefited from their stable prices. Americans have always had a deep-seated distrust of monopolies and centralized power, both in government and in the wealthy.

    • Rockefeller's Approach to Monopoly and Its Impact on American CultureRockefeller's belief in collectivism over free-market competition led to the acceleration of the demise of smaller businesses, while also establishing him as a polarizing figure in American culture.

      Rockefeller's approach to monopoly with Standard Oil was rooted in his belief that free-market competition and social Darwinism is bad and that there needs to be a level of collectivism. This viewpoint was an American view that is different from communism and socialism. However, this viewpoint falls down when he accelerated the death of all of these businesses. While some places made sense for him to exert his power, the exertion of power was far more limited than the number of places where they actually reached and exerted their power. Despite the mixed public reception, Rockefeller was viewed as a prototype of so much of American culture today where individuals can be viewed as sinister villains and great heroes simultaneously.

    • The Strength Leads to Strength Theory and Economies of Scale in BusinessIn capital-intensive businesses, large volume leads to economies of scale and lower variable costs. But the strength leads to strength theory does not apply in all industries, such as those with low fixed costs.

      Rockefeller's Standard Oil is a classic example of how strength leads to strength theory and the importance of economies of scale in the refining business. The larger the volume, the better the opportunities for giving the public cheaper products. Capital-intensive businesses require massive fixed costs, and sheer size matters greatly as it translates into economies of scale. Such businesses need a volume game to get plants at full capacity as fast as possible, keeping variable costs super low. However, strength leads to strength is not always applicable, specially in industries with no fixed costs or low fixed costs, like the restaurant business.

    • The Immense Value of Standard OilStandard Oil was a highly profitable business that captured every scrap of value it created, with profits accounting for 0.25% of the entire country's GDP in 1900. Its breakup resulted in the rise of ExxonMobil, Chevron, and other large corporations.

      Standard Oil was a highly profitable business that employed 100,000 people and created a kerosene boom in the US and the world. The company captured every scrap of value it created, recycling and reinvesting the capital extensively. Despite the scant data available, inflation-adjusting the numbers is probably not the right way to assess the business's value. Instead, analyzing its profits as a percentage of the GDP at that time is more accurate. Standard Oil's profits accounted for 0.25% of the entire country's GDP in 1900. The company's breakup resulted in the rise of ExxonMobil, Chevron, and other large corporations, which indicate the immense value tied up in it.

    • The Impact of Standard Oil on the Oil IndustryWhile the impact of Standard Oil on consumers can be debated, it is clear that the company's approach to consolidation and efficiency played a major role in the evolution of the oil industry, driving innovation and technological advancements.

      The development of Standard Oil had a significant impact on the oil industry and ultimately led to the industry's integration and standardization. While it's impossible to know whether the industry would have developed in a similar way without Standard Oil, it's clear that Rockefeller's approach to consolidation and efficiency played a major role in its evolution. Whether this was ultimately good or bad for consumers is debatable, but it's clear that the oil industry has been a major driver of innovation and technological advancement. Without the standardization brought about by companies like Standard Oil, we may not have had many of the products and lifestyle improvements that we take for granted today.

    • Valuable Lessons in Entrepreneurship and Sports HistoryThe shows, There Will Be Blood and Deadwood, provide insight on the early days of oil and gold rush, teaching valuable lessons on entrepreneurship, risks, and capital. Secret Base's sports history series also provides engaging content.

      Ben and David discuss two compelling shows, There Will Be Blood and Deadwood, which offer an insight into the early days of the oil and gold rush. The shows provide valuable lessons on the entrepreneurship, risks, and capital required to thrive in the industry. Additionally, they recommend an entertaining sports history YouTube channel, Secret Base, particularly their series on the Atlanta Falcons and the Mariners. The hosts invite feedback from listeners in Slack, via email, or Twitter and thank their sponsors, including Pilot.com, PitchBook, NordVPN, and listeners for their support.

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    Special: 2021 China Tech Trends (with Tech Buzz China)

    Special: 2021 China Tech Trends (with Tech Buzz China)

    We team up with two of the very best English-language analysts covering China tech today, Rui Ma and Ying Lu from the Tech Buzz China podcast, to talk about the big trends happening on the ground in China right now. We've had Rui and Ying's episodes on repeat in our own podcast players for many years as we researched our Meituan, PDD, Tencent and Alibaba episodes, and we're so excited to have them finally join us live. We had a blast and learned much more about what's actually happening in the world's largest market than the relative trickle of news Western audiences normally receive. Tune in!

    Sponsors:
    Pilot: https://bit.ly/acquiredpilot24
    Statsig: https://bit.ly/acquiredstatsig24
    Crusoe: https://bit.ly/acquiredcrusoe


    Topics and trends covered:
    • How Rui and Ying stay on top of trends in China tech remotely from the US
    • The rise of “tech company like” CPG and other consumer brands in China and extremely fast product development and iteration: e.g., Genki Forest, Perfect Diary and Shein
    • Community group buying and the reinvention of commerce in rural China (along with an eye-opening discussion of what qualifies as “rural” in China... which is very different from the West!)
    • Autonomous and electric vehicle design and production in China (which is the world's largest car market), and the government's push for China to become a global leader in both
    • The current state of anti-trust in China and why investors and operators on the ground in China are optimistic about recent developments

    Links:

    Spotify CEO Daniel Ek

    Spotify CEO Daniel Ek

    We sit down with Spotify CEO Daniel Ek live in Stockholm at Spotify’s amazing HQ studio (check out the video version of this episode — which plays natively on Spotify!). This was an incredibly special and timely conversation: for those who haven’t been paying attention over the past few years, after revolutionizing music Spotify has now ALSO completely transformed our own industry in podcasting. Starting from way behind with ~zero market share in 2018, Spotify has now aggregated the listener market and amazingly surpassed Apple as the world’s largest podcast platform — including close to home with the Acquired audience, where it has 60%+ market share among you all!


    We discuss the origins of this “second act” strategy with Daniel, the vision to move from a music company to an audio company, and what’s coming next with Spotify’s entry into Audiobooks. And of course we relive some key moments from the Acquired canon that Daniel was involved in, including his pivotal conversations with Taylor Swift and her team convincing her to come back to streaming following the release of 1984. Tune in!

    ACQ2 Show:

    Links

    Sponsors:
    Pilot: https://bit.ly/acquiredpilot24
    Statsig: https://bit.ly/acquiredstatsig24
    Crusoe: https://bit.ly/acquiredcrusoe

    Note: Acquired hosts and guests may hold assets discussed in this episode. This podcast is not investment advice, and is intended for informational and entertainment purposes only. You should do your own research and make your own independent decisions when considering any financial transactions.

    Nvidia Part I: The GPU Company (1993-2006)

    Nvidia Part I: The GPU Company (1993-2006)

    He wears signature leather jackets. He can bench press more than you. He makes cars that drive themselves. He’s cheated death — both corporate and personal — too many times to count, and he runs the 8th most valuable company in the world. Nope, he's not Elon Musk, he’s Jensen Huang — the most badass CEO in semiconductor history. Today we tell the first chapter of his and Nvidia’s incredible story. You’ll want to buckle up for this one! 

    Sponsors:
    Pilot: https://bit.ly/acquiredpilot24
    Statsig: https://bit.ly/acquiredstatsig24
    Crusoe: https://bit.ly/acquiredcrusoe


    This episode has video! You can watch it on YouTube

    PSA: if you want more Acquired, you can follow our newly public LP Show feed here in the podcast player of your choice (including Spotify!).


    Links:

    Carve Outs:

    ‍Note: Acquired hosts and guests may hold assets discussed in this episode. This podcast is not investment advice, and is intended for informational and entertainment purposes only. You should do your own research and make your own independent decisions when considering any financial transactions.

    Stratechery (with Ben Thompson)

    Stratechery (with Ben Thompson)

    Ben Thompson joins Acquired to discuss the business of Stratechery itself and celebrate 10 years (!) of the internet’s best strategy analysis destination. Even beyond Stratechery’s enormous impact itself on business and tech over the years, Ben’s work inspired a whole generation of business content creators — this show very much included — and it was super special for us to give the Acquired treatment to one of our own heroes. We cover the full history of Ben pioneering the subscription internet media business model (indeed SubStack’s seed round pitch was “Stratechery-in-a-box”), and how + why he’s evolved the business since and is now doubling down both on podcasting and a broader vision of the Stratechery Plus bundle… including for the first time content not made by Ben himself! Tune in and enjoy. 

    If you want more Acquired, you can follow our public LP Show feed here in the podcast player of your choice (including Spotify!). 

    Sponsors:
    Pilot: https://bit.ly/acquiredpilot24
    Statsig: https://bit.ly/acquiredstatsig24
    Crusoe: https://bit.ly/acquiredcrusoe


    Links:

    ‍Note: Acquired hosts and guests may hold assets discussed in this episode. This podcast is not investment advice, and is intended for informational and entertainment purposes only. You should do your own research and make your own independent decisions when considering any financial transactions.