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    How Important Are Biden And Trump's Ages? We Asked Older Voters.

    en-usSeptember 24, 2023

    Podcast Summary

    • Historic 2024 Election: Oldest Leading Candidates Raise Concerns About Long-Term FitnessThe 2024 presidential election is historic due to the advanced ages of the leading candidates, raising concerns about their ability to handle the demands of the office long-term, resonating with older voters.

      The upcoming 2024 presidential election is historic due to the advanced ages of the two leading candidates, President Joe Biden and former President Donald Trump. Both men would be well into their 80s if reelected, raising concerns about their ability to handle the demands of the office long-term. This issue resonates with older voters as well, with a recent CBS poll indicating that only 34% of voters believe Biden could finish a second term. The age factor has taken on added significance given Biden's recent falls and Trump's ongoing legal issues. The conversation also touched on the energy levels of older adults, as 88-year-old David Reklis shared his own experiences. Despite his continued workouts, Reklis acknowledged that energy levels decline with age, adding to the discussion about the physical demands of the presidency.

    • Unexpected challenge at Vintage Center For Active AdultsOlder adults are an active and diverse demographic that should not be underestimated or overlooked in political discussions

      Age is an issue in the upcoming presidential election, with many voters expressing concerns about the age of the two likely nominees. To gain a deeper understanding, NPR spoke with experts and older voters in Western Pennsylvania, a key battleground state. During their reporting, they encountered an unexpected challenge at the Vintage Center For Active Adults in Pittsburgh – they had to join a line dancing class before they could interview the participants. Despite their initial apprehension, the NPR team participated and learned that older adults, like 70-year-old Neddy Hennig, remain active and engaged in various activities, including line dancing five times a week and learning new skills to challenge their brains. This experience served as a reminder that older adults are an essential and diverse demographic that should not be underestimated or overlooked in political discussions.

    • Age vs Ability: The Debate Among VotersDespite concerns about President Biden's age, some voters believe that ability to do the job is what truly matters, while others prioritize youth. Society's perception of aging can lead to misconceptions, and it's essential to focus on candidates' abilities rather than their age.

      While some individuals, like Henning and Len Zappler, have concerns about President Joe Biden's age, others, like the panelists in the Greater Pittsburgh area, believe that age is just a number and that Biden's ability to do the job is what truly matters. Henning, despite her preference for a younger leader, supports Biden and dismisses concerns about his age. On the other hand, Len Zappler, who is close to Biden's age, expresses worry about his ability to lead. However, Len is also an example of Biden's advisers' point that voters often change their minds when considering the race as a whole. Even a Republican voter like Len, who has voted for Trump in the past, might consider voting for Biden. The panelists in the Greater Pittsburgh area, who represent different political backgrounds, all agree that society often discards things, including people, as they age, leading to misconceptions about what it means to grow older. They emphasize the importance of focusing on a candidate's ability to do the job rather than their age.

    • Considering Age and Health in Political CandidatesWhile youthful energy and quick thinking can be assets, older politicians bring valuable experience and wisdom. However, concerns about physical abilities and memory lapses should be addressed in older candidates.

      While older politicians like Joe Biden and Donald Trump have their unique strengths and weaknesses when it comes to their age and health, there are valid concerns from different perspectives. Rosalie emphasizes the importance of having younger candidates due to her personal experience with processing information more slowly and the dangers of the world. However, she also acknowledges the wisdom of age. When assessing the candidates, Rosalie expresses concerns about Biden's physical abilities, such as his stiff walk and occasional memory lapses. In contrast, she views Trump as a "street fighter" who fared well during his presidency, but acknowledges the negative impact of personal attacks. Overall, the discussion highlights the importance of considering various factors when evaluating political candidates, including their age, health, and leadership abilities.

    • The age and advisers of candidates matterConsider the wisdom and experience of advisers, personal values, and political performance when making voting decisions.

      While there are significant political issues at hand during this election, the age of the candidates and the teams they bring to the table are also important considerations. The wisdom and experience of advisers can greatly impact the effectiveness of a president. Personal values, such as the stance on human life and adherence to beliefs, also play a role in voting decisions. The group expressed differing opinions on the current presidency, with some expressing approval of President Biden's performance and others expressing dissatisfaction with President Trump's character. Ultimately, voters must weigh the various factors and make informed decisions based on their values and priorities.

    • Senior voters prefer stability and offer advice to presidentsSenior voters value authentic leadership and express a preference for stability in government. Biden's administration received favorable remarks, while Trump was urged to tell the truth and Biden to work on his walk.

      The senior voters interviewed in this NPR segment expressed a preference for stability and order in government, with Biden's administration receiving favorable remarks compared to Trump's. The interviewees also offered unsolicited advice to both presidents, with Trump being urged to tell the truth and Biden to work on camouflaging his walk. The conversation underscores the importance of authentic leadership and the impact of political instability on public perception. Additionally, the podcast "Consider This" from NPR is supported by the Kresge Foundation, which aims to expand equity and opportunity in cities across America, and by Washington Wise, an original podcast from Charles Schwab that discusses Washington policies and their potential impact on investors' portfolios.

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