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    How Designer Fruit Is Taking Over the Grocery Store

    en-usJuly 05, 2024

    Podcast Summary

    • Agricultural TechCompanies are revolutionizing agriculture by producing designer fruit, focusing on flavor, and using tech like AI to improve processes, with Oracle Cloud Infrastructure offering a one-stop solution for various business needs.

      Tech news impacts various industries, and in this case, it's revolutionizing agriculture. Companies are now focusing on producing designer fruit, which is specially bred and grown to be more flavorful for consumers. This trend, which has been ongoing for about a decade, is driven by the desire to provide consistently pleasurable eating experiences. The process involves selecting specific traits, primarily focusing on flavor. On the other hand, in the tech world, advancements in AI require significant processing speed, and Oracle Cloud Infrastructure (OCI) offers a solution by being a single platform for infrastructure, database, application development, and AI needs, enabling businesses to do more while spending less.

    • Flavorful produce breedingHistorically, produce buyers prioritized visual appeal, shelf life, and affordability over taste, leading to mass production of fruits and vegetables bred for those qualities. Now, growers use traditional cross-breeding methods to create new varieties with a focus on sweetness and texture in response to consumer demand.

      The current focus on finding flavor in fruits and vegetables at grocery stores is a relatively new development, as historically, produce buyers prioritized visual appeal, shelf life, and affordability. This led to the mass production of fruits and vegetables that were bred for these qualities, rather than for taste. However, with the rise of consumer demand for more flavorful options, growers are now turning to traditional cross-breeding methods to create new varieties that prioritize sweetness and texture. It's important to note that these new varieties are not created using genetic modification or lab-based approaches, but rather through the natural process of cross-breeding two different parents to create a new offspring. An example of this is Jumbo's Blueberries, a product that has been bred specifically for its delicious flavor and is sold by Family Tree Farms. Overall, the shift towards prioritizing flavor in fruits and vegetables is a positive development for consumers, as it allows for a more enjoyable eating experience.

    • Designer Fruits BreedingDesigner fruits like blueberries and Sumo citrus are the result of lengthy breeding processes involving constant cross-pollination to create desirable offspring with unique characteristics. They require special care and are often more valuable due to their unique traits and specific growing and handling requirements.

      Designer fruits, like the large and sweet blueberries and the softball-sized Sumo citrus, are the result of a lengthy breeding process that involves constantly cross-pollinating different parent plants to produce desirable offspring. These fruits often have unique characteristics, such as size, taste, and texture, that make them more valuable and require special care during cultivation and transportation. For example, the large blueberries are much bigger, sweeter, and crunchier than conventional blueberries, and are created through years of selective breeding and cloning. Sumo citrus, on the other hand, is a seedless, super sweet mandarin citrus fruit that is twice the price of a conventional orange due to its delicate nature and specific growing and handling requirements. The breeding process for these fruits can take up to a decade from start to finish, making them a long-term investment for farmers and consumers alike.

    • Designer Fruits, Cybersecurity AIFarmers invest in designer fruits with higher costs due to consumer demand and superior taste, while cybersecurity organizations must employ AI to protect against advanced threats

      Some farmers make a deliberate choice to grow designer fruits, despite the higher costs, due to their superior taste and consumer demand. This decision involves investing more in labor, resources, and care during harvesting, packing, and distribution. These fruits, such as grapes flown by air, require extra attention and yield less than conventional varieties. The farmer's calculation is that consumers will pay a premium for these fruits, allowing the farmer to maintain profitability with fewer sales. In the realm of cybersecurity, another significant takeaway is the increasing use of AI by cyber attackers. Organizations must now employ AI-powered solutions to protect themselves from these advanced threats. Zscaler's Zero Trust architecture with powerful AI engines, trained on 500 trillion daily signals, offers robust protection against ransomware and AI attacks. Regarding designer fruits, their higher cost is mainly due to the additional labor and resources required for their harvesting, packing, and distribution. The farmers' hope is that consumers will appreciate the superior taste and be willing to pay a premium for these fruits. This investment in quality and consumer satisfaction can lead to a more enjoyable and sustainable food future.

    • Flavorful Fruits and VegetablesConsumers are buying more flavorful fruits and vegetables, leading to a 31% overall increase in spending since 2018, with a 11% increase in volume.

      Despite the increasing costs of groceries, consumers are still buying more fruits and vegetables, particularly those with enhanced flavors. This trend is predominantly seen in fruit due to the shift towards snacking rather than cooking. While there are also higher flavor premium vegetables emerging, the focus on fruit is likely due to its popularity as a snack item. The influence of these flavorful fruits and vegetables has led to a 31% overall increase in consumer spending since 2018, with consumers buying 11% more fruits and vegetables by volume today compared to 2018. This trend is expected to continue in both fruit and vegetables as companies continue to innovate and consumers seek out delicious and convenient snacking options.

    • Designer produceThe rise of designer fruits and vegetables, bred for superior flavor, faces challenges in affordability and accessibility due to premium prices and climate change impacts on crop resilience.

      The rise of designer fruits and vegetables, carefully bred and cultivated for superior flavor, is a growing trend in the produce industry. However, their premium prices may limit their accessibility to everyone. As climate change increases volatility, breeders will need to balance consumer preferences with crop resilience, focusing on traits like drought and heat tolerance. While it's possible to create flavorful, hardy fruits and vegetables, affordability and accessibility remain challenges. The future of produce will require a delicate balance between consumer demand, economic considerations, and climate adaptation.

    • AI processing costsOracle Cloud Infrastructure (OCI) offers a cost-effective solution for businesses to handle AI processing needs by providing a single platform for infrastructure, databases, application development, and AI, enabling them to do more while spending less.

      AI technology is a game-changer, but its requirement for significant processing speed can lead to high costs. Oracle Cloud Infrastructure (OCI) is a solution that addresses this challenge by offering a single platform for infrastructure, databases, application development, and AI needs. This allows businesses to do more while spending less, as demonstrated by companies like Uber, 8x8, and Databricks Mosaic. Upgrading to OCI can help businesses overcome the expense of AI processing and unlock its full potential. To explore the capabilities of OCI further, take advantage of the free test drive available at oracle.com/Wall-Street or oracle.com/Wall-Street.

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