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    • Latitude Media Rebrands and Expands CoverageLatitude Media, formerly Postscript Media, is rebranding and expanding its coverage to include advanced grid tech, AI, carbon removal, long duration storage, and more. They will launch a new B2B news site and host the Transition AI New York conference on October 19th.

      Postscript Media, the company behind the Carbon Copy and Catalyst podcasts in collaboration with Canary Media, is rebranding as Latitude Media and expanding its coverage to include business and tech trends in advanced grid tech, artificial intelligence, carbon removal, long duration storage, and more. This will include a new B2B news site and the Transition AI New York conference on October 19th, which will feature experts from top companies discussing AI strategies for utilities, renewables, and storage developers. Additionally, the energy transition, inflation reduction, and tech innovation will be the focus of Canary Live Bay Area on October 3rd. Interconnection, specifically for new electricity generators looking to connect to the grid, is becoming a significant barrier to the energy transition, making the work of Latitude Media and events like Transition AI New York increasingly important.

    • Streamlining interconnection for clean energy in the USThe current interconnection process for adding clean energy to the grid in the US is inefficient and costly, leading to a backlog of over 2,000 GW of projects waiting to connect, primarily from solar and storage sources. ERCOT's process could be implemented to streamline interconnection and facilitate a smoother transition to a clean energy future.

      The interconnection process for adding clean energy to the grid in the United States is facing significant challenges and needs regulatory reform. This issue is crucial because as electrification expands and more renewable energy sources are added, the grid is expected to carry double or even triple its current load. The interconnection process, which involves applying for the right to connect to the grid and undergoing extensive studies, is currently similar to the process for expanding highways in the 1950s. This approach is inefficient and costly, leading to a backlog of over 2,000 gigawatts of projects waiting to connect, with 80% of this growth coming from solar and storage projects. Tyler Norris, a former solar developer and current academic, suggests implementing the process used in ERCOT, the Texas electricity market, to streamline interconnection and enable a smoother transition to a clean energy future.

    • FERC Order 2023 addresses power grid interconnection challengesFERC Order 2023 introduces cluster study queue management to group projects together for combined studies, potentially reducing delays and backlogs in interconnecting renewable energy and storage to the power grid.

      The interconnection process for adding renewable energy and storage to the power grid is facing significant challenges due to increased demand and longer timelines. Traditionally, interconnection studies have been conducted project by project, leading to delays and backlogs. FERC Order 2023 aims to address this issue by implementing cluster study queue management, which groups projects together for combined studies, allowing for faster identification of necessary upgrades and potential cost sharing among projects. The order also includes other reforms, such as reducing speculative projects and speeding up the process by imposing penalties for missed deadlines. However, the full impact of this order remains to be seen.

    • FERC order to improve interconnection process for new energy sourcesWhile FERC's order includes reforms, its impact on significantly speeding up the interconnection process or reducing costs may be limited. Empirical evidence for cluster based queues is lacking, and further reforms are necessary.

      The recent FERC order aimed at improving the interconnection process for new energy sources into the power grid is a meaningful step, but it may not be enough to significantly speed up the process or reduce costs. The order includes reforms to the proportional impact method, improved information access, and the evaluation of alternative transmission technologies. However, the main hypothesis is that transitioning from a serial based queue to a cluster based queue will lead to faster interconnection. While there are reasons to suspect this could be beneficial, empirical evidence is lacking. The order's impacts may be more muted than hoped, and further reforms are necessary. Texas, which operates its own grid and has achieved remarkable success in interconnecting new wind energy, could serve as a model for the rest of the country. However, more fundamental issues with the interconnection process in most of the US need to be addressed for meaningful progress.

    • Texas' Rapid Renewable Energy Growth: Efficient Interconnection ProcessERCOT's efficient interconnection process allows for quick and cost-effective integration of renewable energy sources, enabling Texas' rapid growth in renewable energy.

      Texas has rapidly surpassed other states in the US for utility-scale solar installation, adding around 10 gigawatts in just three years. This growth can't be solely attributed to Texas' size; ERCOT, the Texas grid operator, has an efficient interconnection process that allows for quick and cost-effective integration of renewable energy sources. ERCOT doesn't rely on the interconnection process to identify and pay for grid upgrades, instead managing grid constraints through generator curtailment with market dispatch. This approach enables faster and cheaper interconnection while also pursuing grid upgrades through a separate transmission planning process. The market structure in ERCOT also enables clear measurement of congestion costs, ensuring lower-cost, available electricity reaches the load. This efficient interconnection process has been a significant factor in Texas' rapid growth in renewable energy.

    • ERCOT's market-driven approach to transmission upgradesERCOT's free market approach to grid upgrades allows for quicker interconnections but comes with the risk of curtailment, impacting a generator's revenue.

      ERCOT, the Texas power grid operator, uses market data to identify where transmission system upgrades are needed, and generators are welcome to interconnect without extensive studies, but they bear the risk of curtailment. ERCOT provides an assessment of necessary upgrades, but generators are not required to address them as part of their interconnection process. This free market approach allows for quicker interconnections but comes with the risk of curtailment, which can impact a generator's revenue. While some generators may be experiencing more curtailment than anticipated, others may be experiencing less. This system, while having limitations, can serve as a potential model for other jurisdictions.

    • Interconnecting generators in Texas vs. the rest of the countryTexas' energy-only market structure allows for faster interconnection, while other regions have a more complex process with a capacity market and resource adequacy framework to ensure higher reliability through System Impact Studies.

      The process for interconnecting generators in Texas through ERCOT is faster and more straightforward compared to the rest of the country due to its energy-only market structure. However, outside of Texas, there is an additional capacity market and resource adequacy framework in place, which results in a more bureaucratic and slower interconnection process. The primary purpose of this more complex process is to ensure higher reliability by assessing generators' deliverability under extreme contingencies through System Impact Studies (SIS). The SIS analyzes power flow and identifies potential network upgrades required due to overloads. Despite the apparent differences, it's essential to acknowledge that both mechanisms have their merits and are designed to maintain grid reliability in their respective ways. The evidence suggests that neither approach is inherently less reliable than the other, and the choice between them depends on the specific electricity market design and its goals.

    • Complexity of interconnection process in US due to resource adequacy market frameworkThe US interconnection process outside ERCOT is inefficient due to long, bureaucratic, and costly capacity market studies, but transmission providers can adopt an energy-only approach to interconnection while addressing adequacy and reliability through separate planning processes.

      The resource adequacy market framework, which includes capacity markets, outside of ERCOT in the US makes it more challenging to implement Texas' interconnection process due to its complex and time-consuming system impact studies. This approach can lead to inefficiencies that are temporal, bureaucratic, and economic in nature. Temporally, it takes a long time to complete these studies and make decisions on interconnection. Bureaucratically, it requires significant resources and reliance on a limited number of transmission planners and engineers. Economically, it would be more cost-effective for ratepayers if upgrades were pursued via a separate proactive process. However, it is possible for transmission providers outside ERCOT to adopt an energy-only approach to interconnection while addressing congestion, resource adequacy, and reliability through separate transmission planning processes. It will require creativity and careful consideration of the details in implementing this approach outside ERCOT.

    • Efficient Interconnection Process for Power Grids: 2-Step Study ApproachProcessing energy-only and capacity resources separately in a 2-step study process can reduce costs, streamline the interconnection process, and minimize reliability risks. Energy-only resources are turned off in the second step, and relaxing impact thresholds and improving proactive planning enhance efficiency.

      When managing the interconnection process for power grids, it's more efficient to process energy-only resources and capacity resources in separate studies rather than one combined study. This approach, known as a 2-step study process, can help reduce costs, streamline the process, and minimize reliability risks. The first step involves processing energy-only resources, and if they proceed, the second step includes capacity resources. In the second step, energy-only resources are turned off because they don't receive capacity and don't contribute to overloads. Additionally, relaxing the impact threshold for upgrading energy-only resources and improving proactive transmission planning can further enhance the efficiency of the interconnection process.

    • Considering the long-term benefits of renewable energy transmission planningRenewable energy transmission planning should be a cost-benefit analysis, not just a cost analysis, considering factors like increased grid reliability, reduced carbon emissions, and potential economic growth in rural areas.

      When it comes to renewable energy transmission planning, it's important to consider the benefits, not just the costs. Tyler Norris, a PhD candidate at Duke University's Nicholas School of the Environment and a former VP of development at Cypress Creek Renewables, emphasized this point during a conversation on Catalyst. He explained that while cost analysis is crucial, a proactive approach to transmission planning that considers the long-term benefits of renewable energy projects is essential. This includes factors like increased grid reliability, reduced carbon emissions, and the potential for economic growth in rural areas. As Norris put it, "it should be a cost-benefit analysis, not just a cost analysis." This is an important reminder as the renewable energy industry continues to grow and evolve. In the meantime, Norris suggested that we should have a future conversation on this topic. Until then, be sure to check out canarymedia.com for more information on today's topics. Catalyst is a co-production of Postscript Media and Canary Media, and is supported by Prelude Ventures, a venture capital firm that partners with entrepreneurs to address climate change across various sectors. This episode was produced by Daniel Waldorf, mixed by Roy Campanella and Sean Marquan, and features a theme song by Sean Marquan. I'm Shail Khan, and this is Catalyst.

    Recent Episodes from Catalyst with Shayle Kann

    Can chip efficiency slow AI's energy demand?

    Can chip efficiency slow AI's energy demand?
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    The reshoring of American solar trackers [partner content]

    The reshoring of American solar trackers [partner content]
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    Decarbonizing the high seas

    Decarbonizing the high seas
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    Going deep on next-gen geothermal

    Going deep on next-gen geothermal
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    Demystifying the Chinese EV market

    Demystifying the Chinese EV market
    New electric vehicles — including both battery electric and plug-in hybrid vehicles — make up nearly half of new car sales in China. Compared to slowing EV sales in Europe and the U.S. the Chinese market is booming.  So what’s going on? In this episode, Shayle talks to TP Huang, who writes a Substack about EVs, clean energy, and other tech focused on China. (Editor's note: TP Huang is a pseudonym, used for family reasons.) Shayle and TP cover topics like: How EVs became extremely cost competitive with internal combustion engines in China where EV prices dip as low as $10,000 USD Chinese consumer preferences for vehicles packed with features ranging from voice commands to fridges The ubiquity and interoperability of fast charging, plus battery swapping The rapid pace of electrification in heavy-duty trucking  Chinese exports to Europe, Southeast Asia, and elsewhere (although not the U.S.) Recommended Resources: TP Huang: What's going in the Chinese automotive market CNN: A brutal elimination round is reshaping the world’s biggest market for electric cars Bloomberg: Why Europe Is Raising Tariffs on China’s Cheap EVs Make sure to listen to our new podcast, Political Climate – an insider’s view on the most pressing policy questions in energy and climate. Tune in every other Friday for the latest takes from hosts Julia Pyper, Emily Domenech, and Brandon Hurlbut. Available on Apple, Spotify, or wherever you get your podcasts. Be sure to also check out Living Planet, a weekly show from Deutsche Welle that brings you the stories, facts, and debates on the key environmental issues affecting our planet. Tune in to Living Planet every Friday on Apple, Spotify, or wherever you get your podcasts.

    Under the hood of data center power demand

    Under the hood of data center power demand
    Driven by the AI boom, data centers’ energy demand could account for 9% of U.S. power generation by 2030, according to the Electric Power Research Institute. That's more than double current usage. So how do we meet that demand? And what impacts will it have on the grid and decarbonization? In this episode, Shayle talks to Brian Janous, former vice president of energy at Microsoft and current co-founder of Cloverleaf Infrastructure. Brian talks through the options for meeting data center demand, including shaping computational loads to avoid system peaks and deploying grid-enhancing technologies. He and Shayle also cover topics like: Why AI-driven demand will be big, even with “zombie requests” in the interconnection queue How hyperscalers are “coming to grips” with the reality that they may not hit decarbonization targets as quickly as planned Why Brian thinks efficiency improvement alone “isn’t going to save us” from rising load growth Why Brian argues that taking data centers off-grid is not a solution  Options for shaping data center load, such as load shifting, microgrids, and behind-the-meter generation How hyperscalers could speed up interconnection by shaping computational loads Recommended Resources: Electric Power Research Institute: Powering Intelligence: Analyzing Artificial Intelligence and Data Center Energy Consumption The Carbon Copy: New demand is straining the grid. Here’s how to tackle it. Federal Regulatory Energy Commission: Report | 2024 Summer Energy Market and Electric Reliability Assessment Make sure to listen to our new podcast, Political Climate – an insider’s view on the most pressing policy questions in energy and climate. Tune in every other Friday for the latest takes from hosts Julia Pyper, Emily Domenech, and Brandon Hurlbut. Available on Apple, Spotify, or wherever you get your podcasts. Be sure to also check out Living Planet, a weekly show from Deutsche Welle that brings you the stories, facts, and debates on the key environmental issues affecting our planet. Tune in to Living Planet every Friday on Apple, Spotify, or wherever you get your podcasts.

    Drew Baglino on Tesla’s Master Plan

    Drew Baglino on Tesla’s Master Plan
    Tesla’s Master Plan Part 3 lays out the company’s model for a decarbonized economy — and makes the case for why it's economically viable. It outlines a vision for extensive electrification and a reliance on wind and solar power.  In this episode, Shayle talks to one of the executives behind the plan, Drew Baglino, who was senior vice president for powertrain and energy at Tesla until April when he resigned. In his 18 years at Tesla he worked on batteries, cars, and even Tesla’s lithium refinery. Shayle and Drew cover topics like: Why Drew isn't sure that AI-driven load growth “is going to be as dramatic as people think” Drew’s optimism about the U.S.’ ability to build out enough transmission for decarbonization How to deal with the high rates of curtailment and what to do with that excess power Meeting the material requirements of decarbonization and Drew’s experience with permitting Tesla facilities  Recommended Resources: Tesla: Master Plan Part 3 CNBC: Tesla execs Drew Baglino and Rohan Patel depart as company announces steep layoffs The Carbon Copy: AI's main constraint: Energy, not chips Catalyst: Understanding the transmission bottleneck Utility rates could make or break the energy transition – so how do we do it right? On June 13, Latitude Media and GridX are hosting a Frontier Forum to examine the importance of good rate design and the consequences of getting it wrong. Register here. And make sure to listen to our new podcast, Political Climate – an insider’s view on the most pressing policy questions in energy and climate. Tune in every other Friday for the latest takes from hosts Julia Pyper, Emily Domenech, and Brandon Hurlbut. Available on Apple, Spotify, or wherever you get your podcasts.

    Heavy duty decarbonization

    Heavy duty decarbonization
    Batteries are making their way into more passenger cars and commercial vehicles than ever before, but the limits of electrification mean that we’ll likely need alternative fuels to decarbonize heavy transport like ships, planes, and trucks.  So what are those fuels and what modes of transport do they suit best? In this episode, Shayle talks to his colleague Andy Lubershane, partner and head of research at Energy Impact Partners. They talk through the limits of electrification and the alternatives for decarbonizing trucks, ships, and planes, drawing on Andy’s recent blog post, “How will we move the big, heavy things?”. They cover topics like: The main limitations of batteries: density and infrastructure Volumetric and gravimetric density, and why they matter for different types of vehicles How fossil fuels would beat out even a theoretical “uber-battery” multiple times denser than current batteries Why upgrading “always-on” grid infrastructure can be lengthy, expensive, and disruptive  The alternatives to electrification: biofuels, hydrogen, and e-fuels The advantages and limitations of each for different modes of transport Recommended Resources: Port of Long Beach: Our Zero Emissions Future Enterprise Mobility: Electrifying Airport Ecosystems by 2050 Could Require Nearly Five Times the Electric Power Currently Used Catalyst: Understanding SAF buyers Utility rates could make or break the energy transition – so how do we do it right? On June 13th, Latitude Media and GridX are hosting a Frontier Forum to examine the imperative of good rate design, and the consequences of getting it wrong. Register here. And make sure to listen to our new podcast, Political Climate – an insider’s view on the most pressing policy questions in energy and climate. Tune in every other Friday for the latest takes from hosts Julia Pyper, Emily Domenech, and Brandon Hurlbut. Available on Apple, Spotify, or wherever you get your podcasts.

    With Great Power: Why dynamic rates are gaining momentum

    With Great Power: Why dynamic rates are gaining momentum
    This week, we’re featuring a crossover episode of With Great Power, a show produced by Latitude Studios in partnership with GridX. Subscribe on Apple, Spotify, or wherever you get podcasts. Ahmad Faruqui has been researching electricity pricing since the mid 1970’s, when the cost of a kilowatt-hour was flat. But in the 80’s and 90’s, he started working on dynamic pricing – pioneering the concept of time-of-use rates. The big breakthrough for time-of-use rates came during the fallout from the California energy crisis. Later, thanks to the rollout of smart meters, more power providers started experimenting with dynamic rates. Now, new technology is making time-of-use rate design more transparent. This week, Ahmad talks with Brad about why dynamic pricing is gaining momentum among electric utilities – and what makes for good rate design.  On June 13th, Latitude Media and GridX will host a Frontier Forum to examine the imperative of good rate design – and the consequences of getting it wrong. Register at the link in the show notes, or go to latitudemdia.com/events. See you there!

    Could VPPs save rooftop solar?

    Could VPPs save rooftop solar?
    The U.S. rooftop solar market has tanked. Residential applications in California, the largest market in the country, plunged 82% from May through November 2023 compared to the same period in 2022. Contractors are going bankrupt. The big culprits are high interest rates and California’s subsidy cuts. But there are some bright spots. Battery attachment rates in California have surged. So what will it take to revive the U.S. rooftop solar market? In this episode, Shayle talks to Jigar Shah, director of the Loans Programs Office at the U.S. Department of Energy. Jigar argues that the rooftop solar industry should reinvent itself, relying on batteries and virtual power plants (VPPs). He also argues that regulations should focus on system-level dispatchability.  Shayle and Jigar cover topics like: The pros and cons of California’s latest regulations, new energy metering or NEM 3.0 Learning from the mistakes of California’s Self-Generation Incentive Program (S-GIP) The role of VPPs and rooftop solar in meeting accelerating load growth Incentivizing system-level dispatchability  How VPPs complicate the sales pitch for rooftop solar How VPPs could help utilities increase the utilization of infrastructure How to make VPPs more reliable Recommended Resources: U.S. Department of Energy: Virtual Power Plants Commercial Liftoff Latitude Media: Defining the rules of DER aggregation Latitude Media: Unpacking the software layer of VPP deployment CalMatters: What’s happened since California cut home solar payments? Demand has plunged 80%  The Wall Street Journal: The Home-Solar Boom Gets a ‘Gut Punch’ Catalyst is supported by Origami Solar. Join Latitude Media’s Stephen Lacey and Origami’s CEO Gregg Patterson for a live Frontier Forum on May 30th at 1 pm Eastern to discuss Origami’s new research on how recycled steel can help reinvigorate the U.S. solar industry. Register for free on Latitude’s events page.

    Related Episodes

    Understanding the transmission bottleneck

    Understanding the transmission bottleneck
    The U.S. power grid is clogged, and it’s holding back the energy transition.  Solar and wind farms are waiting four or more years to connect to the grid. Rising congestion costs are driving up retail electricity prices while hurting generator revenues. And the process of approving projects for interconnection is so complicated and expensive that it’s forcing developers to abandon the projects they were planning to build.  We need much more transmission capacity and a better process for connecting projects. And we need it now more than ever. Demand for power will skyrocket as we connect EVs, heat pumps and other new loads to the grid. But Rob Gramlich, our guest today, comes with good news: We did it before. We can do it again.  Rob is the founder and president of Grid Strategies. In this episode, Shayle and Rob talk through the three major challenges of transmission – congestion, interconnection, and buildout. And Rob explains how we’ve built out transmission in the past with efforts like ERCOT’s Competitive Renewable Energy Zones (CREZ) and MISO’s Multi-Value Projects (MVPs). They also cover topics like: The history of transmission in the U.S. The three P’s of transmission challenges: planning, permitting, and paying How congestion costs might shoot up over the next few years as grid capacity lags behind generation, causing new generation to slow and retail electricity prices to go up Reforming the slow, complex, and expensive approval process for interconnection at the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Where local opposition fits into transmission’s larger problems Recommended Resources: Grid Strategies: Transmission Congestion Costs in the U.S. RTOs Grid Strategies: Fewer New Miles: The U.S. Transmission Grid in the 2010s Catalyst is a co-production of Post Script Media and Canary Media. Support for Catalyst comes from Climate Positive, a podcast by HASI, that features candid conversations with the leaders, innovators, and changemakers who are at the forefront of the transition to a sustainable economy. Listen and subscribe wherever you get your podcasts. Catalyst is supported by Scale Microgrids, the distributed energy company dedicated to transforming the way modern energy infrastructure is designed, constructed, and financed. Distributed generation can be complex. Scale makes it easy. Learn more: scalemicrogrids.com.

    Turning Texas Green (And Blue Too?)

    Turning Texas Green (And Blue Too?)

    Texas, home of the U.S. oil and gas industry, has become a clean energy superpower. The state already leads the nation in wind-power generation and solar is booming. Last year, Texas generated more electricity from renewable energy sources than from coal.

    Now, as the coronavirus pandemic delivers a blow to the state’s struggling oil and gas industry, wind and solar production remain on a trajectory for continued record growth.

    The rise of renewable energy isn’t the only notable change taking place in Texas, the state’s politics appear to be shifting too. Democratic Presidential Candidate Joe Biden is polling very close to President Trump, who swept the state in 2016. 

    How did Texas become a clean energy leader? What are the politics behind this rise? And what are the politics in Texas likely to be more broadly going forward? Could a growing green economy turn this red state blue?

    Political Climate speaks to Pat Wood, former head of the Texas Public Utility Commission named by Governor George W. Bush and former chairman of the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission, where he led FERC’s responses to the 2000-2001 California energy crisis and the 2003 Northeastern power blackout. Wood compares the Texas and California energy systems and weighs in on the Golden State's recent blackouts.

    Finally, co-hosts Brandon Hurlbut and Shane Skelton make a new election bet.

    Recommended reading: 


    Political Climate is produced in partnership with the USC Schwarzenegger Institute. Listen and subscribe on Apple PodcastsSpotifyStitcherGoogle Play or wherever you get podcasts!

    This episode is brought to you with support from Lyft. Lyft is leading the transition to zero emissions vehicles with a commitment to achieve 100% electric vehicles on the Lyft platform by 2030. Learn more at lyftimpact.com/electric.

    How to Strip Carbon From the Atmosphere

    How to Strip Carbon From the Atmosphere

    Leading climate models point to a sobering reality: Even if the world’s economy reaches net zero emissions by midcentury, we will still have too much CO2 in the atmosphere. And so if we have to not just emit less, but remove greenhouse gases from the atmosphere, how do we do it?

    Today we dive into carbon dioxide removal, or CDR. It’s an increasingly diverse and vibrant technology landscape, with some fundamental business model questions yet to be answered.

    To take stock of this space, we spoke to Sarah Sclarsic, a carbon removal researcher at MIT with business acumen to boot: She co-founded the mobility company Getaround. She’s now an investor and on the boards of two SPACs (one of which took XL Fleet public).

    We survey the existing technologies, ranging from the old school, like planting trees, to the novel, like direct air capture. And then we take a dive into some theoretical bioengineering approaches. 

    Sarah argues that we already use powerful biotech tools for medicine and food. She shares her research on the potential to apply these biotech approaches to CDR, laying out what these technologies might look like, such as bioengineering microbes to assist with enhanced rock weathering or cultivating fields and fields of carbon-locking cassava.

    The Interchange is brought to you by the Yale Program in Financing and Deploying Clean Energy. Through this online program, Yale University is training working professionals in clean energy policy, finance, and technology, accelerating the deployment of clean energy worldwide, and mitigating climate change. To connect with Yale expertise, grow your professional network, and deepen your impact, apply before March 14, 2021.

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    Natural gas whiplash

    Natural gas whiplash
    The natural gas market has been through a wild ride, especially in Europe. The pandemic first pushed the prices way down. Then a resurgent economy and an unusually long European winter sent them back up to record heights. And by September of last year, Russia had dramatically cut natural gas flows to Europe, further squeezing supply. The high prices were especially painful for the continent, which relies heavily on the fuel for home heating, industry and power plants. But high prices also catalyzed efforts to shift to lower carbon technologies like renewables, hydrogen and heat pumps. Then fast forward to this past December, and now gas prices have plummeted again. What’s going on? What’s causing these rapid swings and what might happen next? In this episode, Shayle talks to Anne-Sophie Corbeau, research scholar at Columbia University’s SIPA Center on Global Energy Policy where she studies natural gas and hydrogen. Her article, “Putin’s energy gambit fizzles as warm winter saves Europe” recently ran in Bloomberg. They discuss how we got here, covering topics like: The range of factors at play, such as LNG cargos, a European drought, and unusual weather patterns Whether Europe might resume large-scale natural gas imports from Russia Why China’s zero covid policy and an unusually warm winter amounted to a lucky break for Europe What topics should we cover on the show? Send us an email or voice memo to catalyst@postscripaudio.com. Catalyst is a co-production of Post Script Media and Canary Media. Catalyst is supported by Antenna Group. For 25 years, Antenna has partnered with leading clean-economy innovators to build their brands and accelerate business growth. If you're a startup, investor, enterprise, or innovation ecosystem that's creating positive change, Antenna is ready to power your impact. Visit antennagroup.com to learn more.

    Solar Freakin' Roadways: How Technological Optimism Undermines Sustainability

    Solar Freakin' Roadways: How Technological Optimism Undermines Sustainability

    We’re GOING to make the transition to renewable sources of energy. There is no scenario outside the dark mind of Dick Cheney where we continue to use depleting and polluting fossil fuels over the long run to power society. So how exactly are we going to make the transition? In this episode, Jason, Rob, and Asher talk about some of the magical “solutions” that are being peddled out on the streets of Crazy Town (solar roadways, anyone?!?) and why we’re so quick to jump at technological fixes that ignore math, physics, and ecology. For episode notes and more information, please visit our website.

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