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    Fighting the Korean War

    enSeptember 16, 2023

    Podcast Summary

    • Win up to $2,000 daily with FanDuel Casino's Reward MachineFanDuel Casino offers a free-to-play game with potential winnings of up to $2,000 in daily bonuses. Players receive three chances to spin the reward machine reels every day and can win instantly, collect symbols for weekly prizes, or collect trophies for the grand prize.

      FanDuel Casino offers a daily free-to-play game called Reward Machine, which gives players a chance to win up to $2,000 in casino bonuses. With over 50 million dollars given away already, this game provides an opportunity for significant winnings without any purchase necessary. Players receive three chances to spin the reward machine reels every day, and there are three ways to win: by matching any three symbols for an instant win, collecting symbols for a chance to win weekly prizes, or collecting three trophies for the grand prize. Despite the substantial rewards, privacy concerns have arisen in the news regarding a democratic candidate in Virginia, Susanna Gibson, who creates and sells sex videos with her husband on a Dutch website. The question remains whether her support will be affected by this revelation. Meanwhile, on the Victor Davis Hanson Show, they discuss the Korean War and various news stories, including the controversy surrounding Gibson's adult content business.

    • Understanding historical context and data in evaluating social issuesTom Sowell's book highlights income and test score disparities, warns against all-powerful government, raises concerns about Kamala Harris and Joe Biden's handling of scrutiny

      During the podcast, the importance of understanding historical context and data in evaluating social issues was emphasized. Tom Sowell's new book on social justice fallacies was discussed, with a focus on his findings about income and test score disparities between different racial and economic groups. The speakers warned against the dangers of an all-powerful government aiming for equality, citing historical examples of failed authoritarian regimes. Additionally, concerns were raised about the potential presidency of Kamala Harris and the challenges of removing her from the ticket in the current political climate. Joe Biden's handling of questions about his son Hunter's business dealings was also analyzed, with the speakers noting his use of various defenses and the effectiveness of each one. Overall, the discussion underscored the significance of accurate information and critical thinking in navigating complex social and political issues.

    • Biden Administration Hiding Information on Hunter BidenThe speaker accuses the Biden administration of hiding info on Hunter Biden's business dealings and potential corruption, suggesting they won't appoint a special prosecutor and use Hunter's indictment as a distraction.

      The speaker believes the Biden administration is trying to hide information related to Hunter Biden's business dealings and potential corruption, and they are using various defenses to justify it. They suggest that Joe Biden would not appoint a special prosecutor like Robert Mueller, and that Hunter's indictment on a gun charge is an excuse. They also criticize the media for its perceived corruption and lack of reputation, and suggest that Kamala Harris is a less desirable alternative to Biden. If all else fails, the speaker implies that Biden may use the defense that he was unaware of his son's actions due to his son's alleged cocaine use and out-of-control behavior. The speaker seems to be making these arguments in defense of the Trump administration or in opposition to the Biden administration.

    • Biden family's efforts to hide Hunter's questionable activitiesThe Biden family brought Hunter into the White House to hide potential criminal liabilities and control damaging information, despite negative optics.

      The Biden family's attempts to keep Hunter Biden's questionable activities and potential criminal liabilities hidden have led them to bring him into the White House, despite the risks and potential negative optics. This decision may have been driven by Hunter's desire for attention and rehabilitation, as well as his ability to control damaging information and potentially bring illegal substances into the White House. The family's efforts to downplay Hunter's actions and deflect blame have also led them to label those who speak out as liars, but the mounting evidence and public scrutiny may eventually force them into accepting the reality of the situation. Ultimately, Hunter's behavior and the family's handling of it have created a complex and troubling dynamic that raises serious ethical and moral questions.

    • Politics: Encouraging Controversial Actions Until ConsequencesPolitical figures, like Trump, can benefit from controversial actions until facing consequences, such as losing elections or legal investigations. Loyalty and unpredictability are key factors in politics.

      Political figures, including those mentioned in the discussion like the unnamed individual involved in a scandal and Donald Trump, can encourage and benefit from controversial actions until they face consequences, such as losing an election or facing legal investigations. The conversation also touched upon Megyn Kelly's interview with Trump, where she challenged him on various topics, and Trump's belief in his ability to beat Biden in the polls despite close results. The discussion also highlighted the importance of loyalty in politics and Trump's fixation on potential opponents like Ron DeSantis. Additionally, the speakers acknowledged the potential for unexpected actions by political figures and the difficulty in predicting their outcomes.

    • The unexpected consequences of underestimating legal risksNo one, not even former presidents, is immune from legal consequences. Prepare for potential risks by having skilled lawyers and facing fair and unbiased judges.

      The extraordinary became the ordinary during the investigation into former President Trump's handling of documents. People, including Trump himself, underestimated the potential consequences, assuming that the incidents would not lead to prosecution. However, the unexpected happened, and Trump was indicted. The key lesson is that no one, regardless of their position or power, is immune from legal consequences. The legal proceedings against Trump serve as a reminder that it's crucial to anticipate potential risks and prepare for them effectively. This involves having a team of skilled lawyers and being prepared to face a fair and unbiased judge in various courtrooms. While some politicians, like Trump, may have relied on media coverage in the past, it's uncertain if they can sustain a campaign that way in the future. Republicans like Ron DeSantis, Nikki Haley, Mike Pence, and Chris Christie, however, are seen as potential candidates who could withstand tough questioning and scrutiny.

    • The 2020 Democratic primaries left some unimpressed, leading to Joe Biden as the most viable alternative.The Soviet Union's involvement in the Korean War led to China's entry, dividing Korea and arming the Chinese communists with anti-American sentiment.

      The political landscape during the 2020 Democratic primaries was not impressive to some, leaving Joe Biden as the most viable alternative to a field of less appealing candidates. Regarding the Korean War, a key factor in America's victory was the strategic mistake of inviting the Soviet Union to help defend against North Korea, which led to the Chinese entering the war and aiding the North Koreans despite their ongoing civil war. This decision resulted in the division of Korea and the arming of the Chinese communists, who used anti-American sentiment to their advantage.

    • The Korean War and the Precarious Position of the USDuring the Korean War, the US faced a desperate situation due to its disarmed state and the spread of communism. MacArthur's daring Inchon assault turned the tide, highlighting the importance of military strength and strategic planning.

      During the Korean War, the United States found itself in a precarious position due to its disarmed state and the spread of communism around the world. With the Soviets obtaining the atomic bomb and the US facing the possibility of being overrun in Asia, North Korea, under the influence of China and the Soviet Union, invaded South Korea in 1950. The North Koreans quickly gained control of most of the peninsula, leaving the US and its allies in a desperate situation. Douglas MacArthur's daring amphibious assault at Inchon, however, turned the tide of the war and is now considered one of the most brilliant military moves in American history. This event demonstrated the importance of maintaining military strength and strategic planning in the face of global political and military challenges.

    • MacArthur's Risky Decision to Invade North KoreaMacArthur's decision to invade North Korea led to heavy losses and a long retreat, but Ridgeway's focus on fortified lines, air power, and supply advantages turned the tide and led to victory

      During the Korean War, General Douglas MacArthur made a risky decision to invade North Korea despite the challenges of advancing in colder weather, longer supply lines, and getting closer to China. This decision led to the Battle of the Yalu River, where the Chinese entered the war and inflicted heavy losses on the US forces, resulting in the longest retreat in US military history. The new commander, Matthew Ridgeway, took over and turned the tide by focusing on fortified lines, superior air power, and supply advantages. Ridgeway's leadership led to the recapture of Seoul and the eventual victory in the war. However, the initial misstep at the Yalu River cost the US dearly in terms of resources and lives.

    • The Decision to Halt Advance in Korean WarDuring the Korean War, MacArthur came close to pushing communist forces back beyond 38th parallel but halted advance due to concerns over supply lines and nuclear factor. Debate continues on whether U.S. should have continued push or stabilized.

      During the Korean War, General Douglas MacArthur's forces came close to pushing the communist forces back beyond the 38th parallel, but the decision was made to halt the advance and instead focus on stabilizing the war. This decision was made due to concerns about supply lines and the potential nuclear factor. The northern part of Korea, where the war had started, was the most industrialized and sophisticated region, making it a valuable prize. MacArthur was later relieved of his command and replaced by General Matthew Ridgway. While MacArthur was vocal in his criticism of the decision, he did not go against orders and call the Chinese or Soviets to warn them of impending attacks. The war continued for two more years, resulting in significant destruction of infrastructure and loss of life. The debate continues on whether the U.S. should have continued the push north and potentially risked a larger conflict with China and Russia, or if the decision to stabilize was the correct one. The Korean War also demonstrated the effectiveness of American air supremacy and the devastating impact of air strikes on enemy forces.

    • Lessons learned from General Mark Clark and General Matthew RidgwayDisarming after a war and abandoning military bases can lead to devastating consequences, including loss of lives and equipment, and the proliferation of weapons in the international terrorist market. Emphasizing ground forces and minimizing reliance on airpower can help mitigate these risks.

      Disarming after a war and giving up on a seemingly lost conflict can have devastating consequences. This lesson was learned from General Mark Clark's experience in the aftermath of World War 2, when the strategic stocks were emptied, leading to the loss of millions of dollars in equipment and supplies. Another lesson comes from General Matthew Ridgway's handling of the Korean War, where he emphasized that losing a war is worse than fighting a bad one. The U.S. reliance on firepower and airpower, as well as air supremacy, has been a significant factor in minimizing U.S. losses in wars. However, the abandonment of military bases and equipment, as seen in Afghanistan, can lead to disastrous consequences, including the loss of lives and the proliferation of weapons in the international terrorist market.

    • The balance between offense and defense shifts during warDuring wars, there's a constant shift in the balance between offense and defense, with innovations in weapons and tactics leading to a cycle of response and counter-response.

      During times of war, the balance between offense and defense shifts constantly. In the case of the Korean War, the United States had several advantages, including better weapons like the M1 and M14, superior artillery, and air superiority. However, they also faced challenges, such as the use of shrapnel and the need for better protective clothing. The history of warfare shows a cycle of response and counter-response, with innovations in defense and offense. Today, we are in a period of offensive warfare with drones and advanced weapons, but the defense is trying to catch up. In the agricultural sector, there are also challenges, as Victor Davis Hanson's Ultra series on his website, The Blade of Perseus, reveals. The series delves into the lives of workers on his ranch, revealing stories of liars, thieves, alcoholics, brawlers, and the sex-obsessed. Hanson acknowledges the controversial nature of the series but emphasizes the importance of sharing these stories to provide a more complete picture of rural life.

    • Unique labor force challenges in agricultureAgriculture relies on a diverse, unreliable labor force with unique challenges, requiring farmers to build relationships while managing potential behavioral issues.

      Agriculture work requires a unique type of labor force, often made up of individuals who are willing to work long hours, prefer physical labor, and are not qualified or unable to work in other industries. Farmers often form close relationships with their workers due to the intimacy of working side by side. However, these relationships can sometimes lead to challenges, such as workers overstepping boundaries or engaging in undesirable behaviors. The speaker shares personal experiences of working with diverse laborers, including Native Americans, Hispanics, and Portuguese, as well as individuals from the Oklahoma diaspora. While some of these workers were valuable contributors to the farm, others presented challenges that ultimately led to their departure. Overall, the agricultural industry relies on a labor force that is unreliable, diverse, and often faces unique challenges.

    • The decline of moral authority and control in agingAs people age, their moral authority and ability to maintain control can be challenged. Strong moral values and respect from others are essential to navigating new situations and maintaining order.

      As people age, they face new challenges and the world around them changes, which can test their moral authority and ability to maintain control. The speaker shared a story about their grandparents' ranch, where they experienced the decline of their grandfather's moral authority and the emergence of chaos and lawlessness. The grandfather, who once commanded respect and obedience, was no match for the cultural revolution of the 1960s and the new cast of characters that came with it. Drugs, fornication, and violence became prevalent, and the grandfather, who was not physically strong, was unable to maintain order. Contrastingly, the speaker's other grandfather, who was not as physically imposing, had a strong moral authority that everyone recognized and respected. He was able to resolve disputes among neighbors and adjudicate conflicts over resources. The story serves as a reminder that moral authority and the ability to maintain control can be tested as people age and face new challenges.

    • Farming and Travel: Past vs. PresentFarming evolved from hiring uneducated laborers to adapting to globalization, while travel transformed from an optimistic experience to a raw survival one. Adaptation and realism are essential in both aspects of life.

      Farming and travel have undergone significant transformations over the years. The speaker shared his personal experience of managing a farm and dealing with laborers, highlighting the contrast between the past and the present. In the past, farmers had to hire uneducated laborers who could endure the harsh conditions of farming. However, times changed, and farmers had to adapt to globalization by either getting bigger or getting out. Simultaneously, the speaker also shared his observations on modern travel, which he described as a raw survival experience rather than a civilized one. He contrasted his earlier optimistic attitude towards travel with his current realistic perspective, acknowledging the challenges and inconveniences that come with it. Furthermore, the speaker mentioned his admiration for an author who wrote about travel in the modern day, finding solace in the author's raw and unfiltered description of the travel experience. Overall, the speaker's reflections on farming and travel underscore the importance of adapting to changing times and maintaining a realistic perspective on life's challenges.

    • Modern Airline Industry: Chaotic and UnpredictableThe modern airline industry is plagued by numerous inconveniences and disruptions due to an increase in travelers, low prices, airline incompetence, 'woke' hiring practices, distractions from cell phones and large carry-on bags, and reliance on computers and airlines' greed to maximize passenger numbers.

      The airline industry has become dysfunctional in recent times, leading to numerous inconveniences and disruptions for travelers. Factors contributing to this include an increase in travelers, low prices, airline incompetence, and the impact of "woke" hiring practices. The lack of rules regarding attire and conduct, coupled with the distractions of cell phones and large carry-on bags, can cause significant delays and even prevent people from making connections. Additionally, the reliance on computers and the greed of airlines to maximize passenger numbers have further exacerbated the problem. The result is a chaotic and unpredictable travel experience, with incidents such as missing flight attendants, delayed or canceled flights, and maintenance issues commonplace. Overall, the modern airline industry presents numerous challenges for travelers, making for a senseless and often frustrating experience.

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    Satelittes

    Satelittes
    fiveofthebest.podomatic.com new episode 12 th march still traveling and having little trouble,  will try to add pics tomorrow     Satelittes           Satellites operate in extreme temperatures from −150 °C (−238 °F) to 150 °C (300 °F) and may be subject to radiation in space. Satellite components that can be exposed to radiation are shielded with aluminium and other radiation-resistant material     Communication satellites range from microsatellites weighing less than 1 kg (2.2 pounds) to large satellites weighing over 6,500 kg (14,000 pounds). Advances in miniaturization and digitalization have substantially increased the capacity of satellites over the years. Early Bird had just one transponder capable of sending just one TV channel. The Boeing 702 series of satellites, in contrast, can have more than 100 transponders, and with the use of digital compression technology each transponder can have up to 16 channels, providing more than 1,600 TV channels through one satellite.     A signal that is bounced off a GEO satellite takes approximately 0.22 second to travel at the speed of light from Earth to the satellite and back. This delay poses some problems for applications such as voice services and mobile telephony. Therefore, most mobile and voice services usually use LEO   Satellites face competition from other media such as fibre optics, cable, and other land-based delivery systems such as microwaves and even power lines. The main advantage of satellites is that they can distribute signals from one point to many locations. As such, satellite technology is ideal for “point-to-multipoint” communications such as broadcasting. Satellite communication does not require massive investments on the ground   The Intelsat spans theToday there are approximately 150 communication satellites in orbit with over 100 in geosynchronous orbit. globe, and domestic satellites such as the USSR's Molniya satellites. Western Union's Westar, and Canada's Anik - serve individual countries. The Intelsat V is the latest in its space-craft series, it can handle 12,000 telephone circuits and two color television transmission simultaneously.     Which of the following whirls around the Earth at 5 miles per second? Hubble Space Telescope. The Hubble Space Telescope is named after Edwin Hubble (1889-1953). Hubble's Law (also named after Edwin Hubble) is a theory that suggests that there is a constantly expanding universe.     Weather Satellites     The first weather satellite was launched on February 17, 1959. What was the name of this satellite? Vanguard 2. Vanguard 2 was designed to measure cloud cover, however, this satellite was poor in collecting data as a poor axis and rotation kept it from collecting meaningful information. TIROS-1 which was launched by NASA in 1960, was the first successful weather satellite and operated for 78 days.   THE MOON     The prevailing hypothesis today is that the Earth–Moon system formed as a result of agiant impact, where a Mars-sized body (named Theia) collided with the newly formed proto-Earth, blasting material into orbit around it that accreted to form the Moon.[20] This hypothesis perhaps best explains the evidence, although not perfectly.   The Moon is drifting away from the Earth:The Moon is moving approximately 3.8 cm away from our planet every year. It is estimated that it will continue to do so for around 50 billion years. By the time that happens, the Moon will be taking around 47 days to orbit the Earth instead of the current 27.3 days.   Evolution of moon  7 min http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TuHasBN-U1c 4 min good video http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aSV98i0jzro   STRANGE SATELLITES   Lapetus moon   Iapetus was discovered by Giovanni Domenico Cassini, an Italian–French astronomer, in October 1671  Cassini correctly surmised that Iapetus has a bright hemisphere and a dark hemisphere, and that it is tidally locked, always keeping the same face towards Saturn. This means that the bright hemisphere is visible from Earth when Iapetus is on the western side of Saturn, and that the dark hemisphere is visible when Iapetus is on the eastern side. The dark hemisphere was later named Cassini Regio in his honour.     A further mystery of Iapetus is the equatorial ridge that runs along the center of Cassini Regio, about 1,300 km long, 20 km wide, 13 km high. It was discovered when the Cassini spacecraft imaged Iapetus on December 31, 2004. Peaks in the ridge rise more than 20 km above the surrounding plains, making them some of the tallest mountains in the Solar System. The ridge forms a complex system including isolated peaks, segments of more than 200 km and sections with three near parallel ridges.[27           MIMAS Mimas is a moon of Saturn which was discovered in 1789 by William Herschel.[8] It is named after Mimas, a son of Gaia in Greek mythology, and is also designated Saturn I. With a diameter of 396 kilometres (246 mi) it is the twentieth-largest moon in the Solar System and is the smallest astronomical body that is known to be rounded in shape because of self-gravitation.     The surface area of Mimas is slightly less than the land area of Spain. The low density of Mimas, 1.15 g/cm³, indicates that it is composed mostly of water ice with only a small amount of rock.   TRITON Triton is unique among all large moons in the Solar System for its retrograde orbit around its planet (i.e., it orbits in a direction opposite to the planet's rotation). Most of the outer irregular moons of Jupiter and Saturn also have retrograde orbits, as do some ofUranus's outer moons. However, these moons are all much more distant from their primaries, and are small in comparison; the largest of them (Phoebe)[f] has only 8% of the diameter (and 0.03% of the mass) of Triton.       HUBBLE SPACE TELESCOPE       Launch: April 24, 1990 from space shuttle Discovery (STS-31) Deployment: April 25, 1990 Mission Duration: Up to 20 years Servicing Mission 1: December 1993 Servicing Mission 2: February 1997 Servicing Mission 3A: December 1999 Servicing Mission 3B: February 2002 Servicing Mission 4: May 2009 Size Length: 43.5 ft (13.2 m)Weight: 24,500 lb (11,110 kg) Maximum Diameter: 14 ft (4.2 m) Cost at Launch $1.5 billion Spaceflight Statistics Orbit: At an altitude of 307 nautical miles (569 km, or 353 miles), inclined 28.5 degrees to the equator (low-Earth orbit)Time to Complete One Orbit: 97 minutes Speed: 17,500 mph (28,000 kph) Optical Capabilities Hubble Can't Observe: The Sun or Mercury, which is too close to the Sun Sensitivity to Light: Ultraviolet through infrared (115—2500 nanometers) First Image: May 20, 1990: Star Cluster NGC 3532 Data Statistics Hubble transmits about 120 gigabytes of science data every week. That's equal to about 3,600 feet (1,097 meters) of books on a shelf. The rapidly growing collection of pictures and data is stored on magneto-optical         disks. Power Needs Energy Source: The Sun Mechanism: Two 25-foot solar panels Power usage: 2,800 watts Pointing Accuracy In order to take images of distant, faint objects, Hubble must be extremely steady and accurate. The telescope is able to lock onto a target without deviating more than 7/1000th of an arcsecond, or about the width of a human hair seen at a distance of 1 mile. Hubble's Mirrors Primary Mirror Diameter: 94.5 in (2.4 m) Primary Mirror Weight: 1,825 lb (828 kg) Secondary Mirror Diameter: 12 in (0.3 m) Secondary Mirror Weight: 27.4 lb (12.3 kg) Power Storage Batteries: 6 nickel-hydrogen (NiH) Storage Capacity: equal to 20 car batteries         International space station   It’s the most expensive object ever built At an estimated cost of $100bn dollars, the ISS is the most expensive single object ever built by mankind. Roughly half of the total price was contributed by the USA, the rest by other nations including Europe, Japan and Russia.   Tracy Caldwell in cupola module