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    • Cultural Shift in Biographies and Perception of Visionary FiguresThere's a growing emphasis on the role of elite figures in shaping public opinion and a shift towards more discomfort with their behavior in the current cultural climate.

      Our cultural perspective towards biographies and the behavior of visionary figures has shifted significantly in the last decade. Cal Newport, in his Deep Questions podcast, discussed his initial impressions of the Elon Musk biography and compared it to Steve Jobs' biography. He noted that there is a growing emphasis on the role of elite cultural figures in shaping public opinion and making clear whether a figure is good or bad. Newport also mentioned the increasing balkanization of cultural allegiances and sense-making due to the internet. He found it interesting that there seems to be more discomfort with Musk's behavior compared to Jobs' in the current cultural climate. Newport also mentioned the difficulty of being Musk's PR agent or lawyer due to the need to shape his actions in a minimally damaging way. The podcast also mentioned an opportunity for a one-on-one conversation with Newport through an auction by Authors for Voices of Color.

    • Addressing the complex issue of exhaustion in the publishing industryThe publishing industry's lack of diversity and limited access to internships perpetuates a homogenous workforce, but providing opportunities for underrepresented college students through grants can enrich the industry's talent pool and combat exhaustion.

      The issue of exhaustion among knowledge workers is more complex than just having too much work. While it's true that a heavy workload can drain energy, there are other factors at play. For instance, the publishing industry's lack of diversity and limited access to internships can perpetuate a homogenous workforce. This charity, which raises funds for internship grants for underrepresented college students, aims to change that. By providing opportunities for a wider range of voices and perspectives, the publishing industry can benefit from a more enriched pool of talent. Additionally, during this podcast episode, the speaker discussed the misconception that exhaustion is solely caused by work volume, using the example of Maria Popova, who produces a large quantity of work yet doesn't report feeling tired. The speaker plans to share unexpected but targeted solutions to combat this endemic tiredness in the latter part of the deep dive.

    • Scheduling work matters for exhaustionLong, uninterrupted focus on one project at a time increases productivity and reduces exhaustion

      The volume of work alone does not determine exhaustion. Instead, it's how the work is scheduled that matters. People like Popova and Caro, who work long hours on one project at a time, are not exhausted despite their heavy workload. On the other hand, knowledge workers who constantly switch between tasks and projects end up feeling tired due to the overhead of managing multiple obligations and the frequent interruptions from digital communications. The key is to find a way to schedule work that allows for long, uninterrupted focus on one project at a time to increase productivity and reduce exhaustion.

    • The Negative Effects of Context SwitchingAvoiding context switching by focusing on one task at a time can improve focus, reduce mental fatigue, and increase overall productivity.

      Constantly shifting your attention between different tasks can negatively impact your productivity and cognitive capacity. This phenomenon, known as attention residue, can make it difficult to fully engage with a new task until the previous one has been cleared from your mind. Research suggests that time pressure while finishing a prior task can help disengage and improve performance on the next task. To avoid the negative effects of context switching, it's essential to seek and preserve sequentiality in your work as much as possible. Try to focus on one task at a time before moving on to the next, and consider setting clear deadlines to help facilitate the transition between tasks. By minimizing context switching, you can improve your focus, reduce mental fatigue, and increase overall productivity.

    • Minimize context switching and prioritize tasks with time blockingTo be more productive, minimize context switching and prioritize a few high-priority tasks using time blocking. For email management, consider 'single threading' your inbox to focus on related messages and draft responses offline before switching to the next context.

      To be more productive and focus better on your work, you should aim to minimize context switching and prioritize doing fewer things in a day. Time blocking can help you plan your day more effectively and give each task the undivided attention it needs. However, it's important to recognize that you may not be able to accomplish as many tasks as you initially think, and it's better to focus on a few high-priority items than to spread yourself too thin. One specific area where context switching can be particularly draining is in managing a crowded email inbox. To tackle this, try "single threading" your inbox by focusing on messages that all fall within the same cognitive context and summarizing your responses in a text file before switching to the next context. This can help reduce the mental friction of constantly switching between different tasks and allow you to be more efficient and effective in your work.

    • Minimize context shifting for better focus and efficiencyFocusing on one task or thread at a time can reduce mental exhaustion and increase productivity. Use tools to manage scheduling and minimize interruptions, and consider seeking professional help for racing thoughts or anxiety.

      Minimizing context shifting in your work can significantly reduce mental exhaustion. By focusing on one task or thread of emails at a time before moving on to the next, you can become more efficient and less drained. This approach is particularly important for knowledge workers, as the constant shifting between tasks and contexts can be productivity poison. Consider using tools like text files or calendars to help manage scheduling and meetings, and try to minimize interruptions as much as possible. Remember, it's not just about working fewer hours, but working smarter and reducing the mental load caused by excessive context shifting. Additionally, consider seeking help from a professional therapist if racing thoughts or anxiety are impacting your ability to enjoy life and focus on your work. Online platforms like BetterHelp can make therapy more accessible and convenient.

    • Save money with a high-quality razor and improve reading staminaInvesting in a premium razor and focusing on interesting books with minimal context shifts can save you money and improve your mental health.

      Investing in a high-quality razor like Henson Shaving's precision-milled aluminum razor can save you money in the long run by eliminating expensive subscription fees and disposable razors. Meanwhile, for mental exhaustion, improving reading stamina involves minimizing context shifts, such as checking your phone, and focusing on interesting books. Additionally, implementing interval training can help increase your reading capacity. For those looking to build a better relationship with their mind, BetterHelp offers a convenient and flexible online therapy service with licensed therapists, allowing you to switch therapists at any time for no additional charge. Remember, you can get 10% off your first month using the code "deep questions."

    • Improve Reading Capacity with Interval Training and a Good BookFind an exciting book and use interval training with a timer to increase reading stamina. Reduce screen time before bed to improve sleep quality.

      To improve your reading capacity, it's essential to find an exciting book and use interval training with a timer. Don't try to expand your reading skills with books that don't hold your interest. Instead, find a book you're eager to read and use a timer to focus on reading for specific intervals. This technique, called interval training, can help increase your stamina for concentrating on written content. Additionally, reducing screen time before bed can improve sleep quality. Avoid highly salient, distracting, and arousing content on apps that make money by keeping you engaged for longer periods. Stick to screensavers or books that don't rely on your engagement for revenue. By implementing these strategies, you can significantly enhance your capacity for focusing on written material and improve your overall productivity.

    • Impact of content and work on sleep qualityChoose less emotionally salient screens before bed and manage work effectively to improve sleep quality.

      The type of content you consume before bed and how well you manage your work during the day can significantly impact your sleep quality. Streaming services like Netflix don't particularly care if you binge-watch shows for hours on end or not, but the content you choose can affect your brain's ability to calm down and fall asleep. Additionally, having a lot of open tasks and projects in your head can make it difficult for your brain to relax and fall asleep. To improve your sleep, consider shifting to less emotionally salient screens before bed and implementing better organizational systems for managing your work during the day. This can help reduce stress and anxiety, making it easier for your brain to wind down and get a good night's rest.

    • Consider planning meaningful activities for non-work hoursPlanning enjoyable activities after work can help reduce stress and increase fulfillment, rather than just aiming for less work or no plan at all.

      While it may seem counterintuitive, reducing work hours or having no plan during downtime may not necessarily lead to relaxation and rejuvenation, especially for organized individuals. Instead, having a varied and rejuvenating plan can help make the most of non-work hours and provide a sense of accomplishment and pride. The key is to focus on the content of activities, not just the planning around them, as the actual demands and reasonableness of work are often the sources of stress. So, after shutting down work, consider sketching a plan for meaningful and interesting activities that bring joy and fulfillment beyond the realm of productivity.

    • Building Efficaciousness for Personal GrowthFocus on developing a sense of efficaciousness first for motivation, clarity, and a deeper understanding of values, then build upon it with discipline and craft for a more fulfilling life.

      Both discipline and efficaciousness are essential components of personal growth and leading a meaningful life. Discipline, often thought of as an identity or a false god, is actually a tool for building efficaciousness, the belief in one's ability to take action towards goals. Without a foundation of efficaciousness, efforts to determine values and build a life around them are likely to be derailed. Therefore, it's crucial to focus on developing a sense of efficaciousness first, which can lead to motivation, clarity, and a deeper understanding of what one truly values. This foundation can then be built upon with discipline, control, and craft to cultivate a deeper, more fulfilling life.

    • Capability comes before depth in the deep life stackTo live a deep and meaningful life, first focus on becoming capable by managing time, attention, and tools, then continue climbing the deep life stack to cultivate depth through identifying values, creating a legacy, and living a remarkable life.

      Becoming a deeply meaningful and purposeful person requires both capability and depth. Capability refers to having control over one's time, attention, and tools, while depth involves identifying values, creating a legacy, and living a remarkable life. However, attempting to cultivate depth before becoming capable can lead to self-accusation and dissipation. The case of Yalon, who was once a deep person but lost his way, illustrates this point. He had mastered the capable aspect of the deep life stack but neglected the deeper questions of purpose and legacy. As a result, he found himself addicted to video games and unable to focus on studying or planning ahead. To truly live a deep and meaningful life, one must first become capable and then continue climbing the deep life stack to cultivate depth.

    • Balancing Productivity and Depth for FulfillmentBalancing productivity and depth is crucial for a fulfilling life. Prioritize values, create rituals, and make sacrifices to bring ambitious projects to life while maintaining depth and meaning.

      Both productivity and depth are essential for a fulfilling life. Productivity without depth can lead to a sense of emptiness, while depth without productivity can make it difficult to bring ambitious projects to life. Stuart Reed's experience of writing a book while juggling a busy professional and personal life serves as a great example. The idea for his book had been percolating since 2017, but it wasn't until he received a book deal that he had to commit to turning in a certain number of words by a deadline. Despite the challenges, he managed to make progress by prioritizing his values, creating rituals to remind himself of their importance, and finding ways to sacrifice time and attention for his project. By combining productivity and depth, Reed was able to bring his book to life and find fulfillment in the process.

    • Focusing on Writing a BookTo write a book, set aside dedicated time each day and create a distraction-free environment. Protect this time by setting boundaries and maintaining a consistent routine, even if progress is slow.

      Writing a large, intellectually demanding book requires dedicated focus and a well-planned routine. The speaker shares his experience of taking a book leave and moving to Paris to focus solely on writing, but finding that the time wasn't enough to complete the manuscript. He then had to return to his day job and compress the writing process into his mornings. Protecting this time required setting boundaries, such as waking up earlier and not checking email until later in the day, and creating a distraction-free environment. This consistent writing routine, even if only a few words were written each day, helped the speaker make progress on the project.

    • Writing daily, even during hardships, leads to progressConsistent writing habits, even during difficult times, can lead to significant progress over time

      Consistent writing habits, even if it's just an hour a day, can lead to significant progress over time. The author wrote 300 to 700 words daily and made use of techniques like leaving work half-finished and using TKs to maintain momentum. However, the writing process became more complicated when the author's daughter was born with a rare genetic disorder, causing a halt in productivity. The family went through a difficult period of acceptance and coping, but eventually found the willpower to get back on track. Writing, even during challenging times, was a way to keep moving forward.

    • Embracing variability and allowing for non-productivityEmbrace unexpected challenges, maintain consistency in routine, and focus on small, consistent efforts for long-term productivity.

      Embracing variability and allowing for periods of non-productivity in the face of life's unexpected challenges is a crucial aspect of slow productivity. While it may seem counterintensive to put important projects on hold, doing so can ultimately lead to greater success in the long term. Additionally, having a consistent morning routine can help maintain productivity even with added responsibilities, such as raising a family. By focusing on small, consistent efforts each day, even in the midst of chaos, individuals can continue to make progress towards their goals.

    • Minimizing context switching improves productivityInvesting resources to minimize context switching reduces the negative impact of a new project on your schedule, allowing for more efficient and effective work.

      Investing time and money in minimizing context switching can significantly reduce the negative impact of a new project on your schedule. The author, for instance, spent resources on research assistance to focus on writing, which was the most important task. Context shifting, rather than the raw hours required, is the major factor determining the difficulty of adding a new project to a professional schedule. By minimizing context switching, the author was able to work on the project largely in single continuous context, reducing its overall impact on their work schedule. Additionally, having a child and becoming more efficient at work helped the author manage their time effectively and balance their work and personal life.

    • Believing in your ability to make progress and committing to focused workBelieve in your capacity to work on projects despite a busy schedule, commit to 90 minutes of focused work daily, and overcome self-imposed limitations.

      Work is more complex than it seems, and with the right mindset and prioritization, it's possible to make significant progress on important projects despite a busy schedule. Stewart, who wrote a book while holding down a full-time job, shares his experience. He admits that he once believed he couldn't get up early, but found that this was just a self-imposed limitation. Additionally, committing to a project and being accountable for its completion can be a powerful motivator. Stewart suggests protecting 90 minutes a day for focused work, as the long-term benefits can be substantial. Now that his book is published, Stewart is considering writing another one. His advice to those looking to make progress on their projects is to believe in their ability to do so and to make a consistent commitment to working on them every day.

    • Rhone Commuter Collection: Professional Clothing for Busy ProfessionalsThe Rhone Commuter Collection offers wrinkle-resistant, flexible, and odor-resistant clothing for professionals who need to look good on the go. Shopify is a powerful commerce platform that enables businesses to sell online and reach a global audience.

      The Rhone Commuter Collection offers comfortable, flexible, and wrinkle-resistant clothing for professionals on the go. The collection, which includes pants, dress shirts, and polos, is made with four-way stretch fabric for breathability and flexibility. It also features gold fusion anti-odor technology and is machine washable and dryer safe. With its wrinkle release feature, you can wear the same outfit from morning to night without worrying about ironing. The Commuter Collection is ideal for those who have busy schedules and need to look professional at all times. Shopify, on the other hand, is a powerful commerce platform that enables businesses to sell online and in-person. It offers a seamless checkout process and converts browsers into buyers with its user-friendly interface. With Shopify, businesses can reach a global audience and handle large volumes of orders. If you're planning to sell products online, Shopify is a great choice.

    • Embracing a unique approach to productivityLauren Groff, a successful writer, works on multiple projects simultaneously, writes entire first drafts longhand, and follows a strict schedule to efficiently filter for literary magic, resulting in numerous National Book Award finalists.

      Successful writer Lauren Groff, known for her literary fiction, embraces a unique approach to productivity. To maintain her impressive publishing pace, she works on multiple projects simultaneously, keeping each in distinct areas of her office. When starting a new book, she writes the entire first draft longhand and never looks back, trusting that the ideas that resonate will surface during subsequent drafts. Her method allows her to efficiently filter for literary magic, focusing on the "lightning bolts" of characterization and plot. Groff's strict schedule, including dedicated writing hours and a clear separation between creative and business tasks, further contributes to her productivity. By embracing this slow productivity method, she has produced three National Book Award finalists and continues to create captivating works.

    • The power of focusing on what matters and working steadilyConsistent effort and focus on important tasks during dedicated work hours can lead to impressive productivity results over time.

      Productive writing careers don't require long hours or constant productivity. Instead, writers like Lauren and Jessie demonstrate the power of focusing on what matters and working steadily for a reasonable amount of time each day. Lauren, who takes five years to write a book, interleaves projects and ensures she doesn't confuse cognitive context by working in different spaces. She emphasizes the importance of not wasting time on unimportant tasks and trusting that consistent effort will lead to impressive results over time. Jessie, on the other hand, lives in New Hampshire during the summer and writes for four hours every morning. Her active lifestyle and time spent outdoors contribute to her productivity. Both writers demonstrate that slow productivity, with a focus on the right activities during dedicated work hours, can lead to impressive careers. If only there was a book on this topic, it would be a valuable resource for those seeking to optimize their own productivity. Until then, remember to stay focused, work steadily, and trust that time and aggregation will lead to impressive results.

    Recent Episodes from Deep Questions with Cal Newport

    Ep. 302: Re-Enchanting Work

    Ep. 302: Re-Enchanting Work

    We talk a lot on this show about how to organize and execute your work, but not enough about where to do it. In this episode, Cal explores the theory and practice of “adventure working,” in which you escape to novel and inspiring locations to tackle your most demanding and interesting cognitive efforts. He then answers reader questions about habits and rituals, before ending with a critical look at a famous football club’s distressing embrace of pseudo-productivity.

    Below are the questions covered in today's episode (with their timestamps). Get your questions answered by Cal! Here’s the link: bit.ly/3U3sTvo

    Video from today’s episode: youtube.com/calnewportmedia

    Deep Dive: Re-Enchanting Work [5:39]

    - What are Cal’s health habits? [31:12]
    - What’s the difference between discipline and rituals? [34:08]
    - How does Cal read so much? [37:37]
    - What are Cal’s writing-related rituals? [40:44]
    - Should I go slow in my job hunting? [45:05]
    - CALL: Working at a natural pace as a teacher [49:47]
    - CALL:  How to navigate the “pull system” [54:31]

    CASE STUDY: Organizing files in a household [1:00:57]

    CAL REACTS: Manchester’s United’s Pseudo-Productivity [1:11:13] 

    Links:

     

    Thanks to our Sponsors: 


    Thanks to Jesse Miller for production, Jay Kerstens for the intro music, Kieron Rees for slow productivity music, and Mark Miles for mastering.

    Ep. 301: Reclaiming Time and Focus (w/ Jordan Harbinger)

    Ep. 301: Reclaiming Time and Focus (w/ Jordan Harbinger)

    In this episode, the proverbial tables are turned, with Cal being interviewed by Jordan Harbinger about time, focus, and the quest for a slower notion of productivity. (This interview originally aired as episode 975 Jordan's can’t-miss podcast, The Jordan Harbinger Show).

    Below are the questions covered in today's episode (with their timestamps). Get your questions answered by Cal! Here’s the link: bit.ly/3U3sTvo

    Video from today’s episode:  youtube.com/calnewportmedia

    - INTERVIEW: Cal being interviewed by Jordan Harbinger [1:54]

    Links:
    Buy Cal’s latest book, “Slow Productivity” at www.calnewport.com/slow
    Get a signed copy of Cal’s “Slow Productivity” at https://peoplesbooktakoma.com/event/cal-newport/ 

    Thanks to our Sponsors:

    mintmobile.com/deep
    grammarly.com/podcast
    landroverusa.com/defender
    rhone.com/cal

    Thanks to Jesse Miller for production, Jay Kerstens for the intro music, Kieron Rees for slow productivity music, and Mark Miles for mastering.

    Ep. 300: Hidden Technology Traps

    Ep. 300: Hidden Technology Traps

    There has been a lot of attention paid recently to the impact of technology like social media on the mental health of young people. But this is not the only technology trap lurking for this generation. In this episode, Cal talks about three subtle but significant ways in which our current technology culture is setting up young people for professional failure in the years ahead. He then provides some advice for resisting this fate. In addition to this discussion, he answers questions from the audience and reacts to one of the coolest examples of slow craft that he’s encountered in a long while.

    Below are the questions covered in today's episode (with their timestamps). Get your questions answered by Cal! Here’s the link: bit.ly/3U3sTvo

    Video from today’s episode:  youtube.com/calnewportmedia

    Deep Dive: The Burnout Society [7:53]

    - How can I stop distraction relapses? [35:18]
    - How can I reduce my social media addiction without abandoning these technologies? [39:37]
    - How can I schedule deep work with a scattered class schedule? [44:29]
    - How should I reintroduce video games after a successful digital declutter? [47:14]
    - How do I apply Slow Productivity later in life? [51:04]
    - CALL: How to formulate a deep life when you’re young [54:41]   

    CASE STUDY: Tweaking the time block planner [1:06:44] 

    CAL REACTS: A Slow Reconstruction of an Ancient City [1:11:00]

    Links:


    Thanks to our Sponsors: 


    Thanks to Jesse Miller for production, Jay Kerstens for the intro music, Kieron Rees for slow productivity music, and Mark Miles for mastering.

    Ep. 299: Our Love/Hate Relationship with Personal Productivity

    Ep. 299: Our Love/Hate Relationship with Personal Productivity

    Cal has been writing professionally about issues related to personal productivity for two decades. In today’s episode, he provides a short history of what he’s observed during this period about out constantly shifting relationship with this topic, from the quiet optimism of the 1990s, to the techno-mania of the early 2000s, to the whiplash shift from anti-distraction to anti-work sentiments in the 2010s. He ends with a summary of where we are today and what he currently thinks matters in thinking about getting things done. During the Q&A session, Cal is joined by special guest host Scott Young (whose new book is GET BETTER AT ANYTHING) to help answer your questions. We conclude with a list of the books Cal read in April.

    Below are the questions covered in today's episode (with their timestamps). Get your questions answered by Cal! Here’s the link: bit.ly/3U3sTvo

    Video from today’s episode:  youtube.com/calnewportmedia

    Deep Dive: The 20-year history with personal productivity [4:20]

    - How does Cal organize his files as a technical researcher? [1:04:55]
    - How slow is too slow? [1:18:48]
    - Does “Monk Mode” actually work? [1:27:25]
    - How do I adapt my organizational systems to do more complicated work? [1:36:07]
    - What are the most underrated habits for living a great life? [1:49:46]

    CASE STUDY: Unconventional slow productivity [1:55:56]

    FINAL SEGMENT: The 5 Books Cal Read in April 2024 [2:04:51]

    Links:
    Buy Cal’s latest book, “Slow Productivity” at calnewport.com/slow
    Get a signed copy of Cal’s “Slow Productivity” at peoplesbooktakoma.com/event/cal-newport/ 
    Cal’s monthly book directory: bramses.notion.site/059db2641def4a88988b4d2cee4657ba?v=448bf8afad0740d18f6b109b4bd40d51
    moehrbetter.com/gtd-advanced-workflow-diagram.html

    Books Discussed in Deep Dive:

    7 Habits of Highly Effective People
    How To Become CEO
    Getting Things Done
    The Four Hour Work Week
    Essentialism
    How To Do Nothing

    April Books:

    An Empire of Their Own by Neal Gabler
    Co-intelligence by Ethan Mollick
    Dragons of Eden by Carl Sagan
    The Perfect Mile by Neal Bascomb
    To Heal a Fractured World by Jonathan Sacks

    Thanks to our Sponsors:

    This show is brought to you by BetterHelp. Give online therapy a try at betterhelp.com/deepquestions
    notion.com/cal
    zocdoc.com/deep
    shopify.com/deep

    Thanks to Jesse Miller for production, Jay Kerstens for the intro music, Kieron Rees for slow productivity music, and Mark Miles for mastering.

    Ep. 298: Rethinking Attention

    Ep. 298: Rethinking Attention

    We think of information as something neutral; a spotlight that helps illuminate the reality of the outside world. Accordingly, more information is better than less. In this episode, Cal pushes back on this model, arguing that the form in which information arrives can strongly impact the understanding we extract. We must therefore be more intentional about what and how we pay attention. He then answers reader questions and surveys some unusual but entertaining stories about slowness.

    Below are the questions covered in today's episode (with their timestamps). Get your questions answered by Cal! Here’s the link: bit.ly/3U3sTvo

    Video from today’s episode:  youtube.com/calnewportmedia

    Deep Dive: Rethinking attention [4:08]

    - What books should I read to help me develop a deep life? [34:35]
    - Does writing by hand have benefits for your brain? [38:40]
    - Should I get a brain scan to prove I have a low IQ? [43:46]
    - Should I use ChatGPT for book recommendations? [47:39]
    - How can I avoid wasting your gap year? [49:40]
    - CALL: Is “Slow Productivity” related to “The Burnout Society” by Buying-Chui Han? [55:32]

    CASE STUDY: Utilizing the phone foyer method [1:01:58]  

    FINAL SEGMENT: Slow news [1:10:58]

    Links:


    Thanks to our Sponsors: 


    Thanks to Jesse Miller for production, Jay Kerstens for the intro music, Kieron Rees for slow productivity music, and Mark Miles for mastering.

    Ep. 297: The Deep Life Hardware

    Ep. 297: The Deep Life Hardware

    Why do you struggle with your grand attempts to escape distraction and aimlessness to make your life deeper? In this episode, Cal draws on an unexpected metaphor – Charles Babbage, Ada Lovelace, and the Analytical Engine – to help identify the subtle obstacle on your path to increase depth. With this new understanding in hand, he then details a specific gameplan to get around it. Later, he takes questions from the audience and reacts to the new AI Pin, a tool intended to render smartphones obsolete.

    Below are the questions covered in today's episode (with their timestamps). Get your questions answered by Cal! Here’s the link: bit.ly/3U3sTvo

    Video from today’s episode:  youtube.com/calnewportmedia

    Deep Dive: The Deep Life Hardware [4:09]

    - Does personal productivity make us anxious? [34:04]
    - How can I build skills without getting in the way of my existing work? [42:11]
    - How can I build a deeper life after years of neglect? [46:00]
    - How is Sam Sulek’s stripped down YouTube channel doing so well? [52:12]
    - How can I convince my husband that I’m not a time management snob? [1:02:38]
    - CALL: Obsessing over quality [1:06:04]

    CASE STUDY: Shifting a mindset to do more deep work [1:11:04] 

    CAL REACTS: Is the Al Pin the End of Smartphones? [1:17:46]

    Links:


    Thanks to our Sponsors: 


    Thanks to Jesse Miller for production, Jay Kerstens for the intro music, Kieron Rees for slow productivity music, and Mark Miles for mastering.

    Ep. 296: Jane Austen’s To-Do List (LIVE)

    Ep. 296: Jane Austen’s To-Do List (LIVE)

    In the first ever live episode of Deep Questions, recorded at People’s Book in Takoma Park, MD, Cal extracts a modern productivity lesson from the tale of Jane Austen’s frustrated ambitions, before taking questions from the audience.

    Below are the questions covered in today's episode (with their timestamps). Get your questions answered by Cal! Here’s the link: bit.ly/3U3sTvo

    Video from today’s episode:  youtube.com/calnewportmedia

    Deep Dive: Jane Austen’s To-Do List [3:22]

    — Is Cal building his YouTube channel with social media tactics? [27:36]
    — How can I do less in such a busy world? [31:53]
    — How do I escape the flow state? [37:01]
    — How can someone become a star while obsessing over craft? [40:52]
    — How can I apply Slow Productivity to unrelated projects? [46:40]
    — How does Cal develop his writing frameworks? [50:20]
    — How can I apply Slow Productivity principles to a team? [52:48]
    — How can I avoid the Zoom apocalypse? [57:48]
    — Is there a conflict between working at a natural pace and obsessing over quality? [1:07:16]
    — How can a personal trainer build a wellness solution company? [1:09:46]
    — How can our team not get delayed with technical problems? [1:13:00]
    — How can a young lawyer manage peer relationships with teams? [1:16:38]         


    Links:

    — Buy Cal’s latest book, “Slow Productivity” at calnewport.com/slow
    — Use this link to preorder a signed copy of “Slow Productivity”: peoplesbooktakoma.com/preorder-slow-productivity/
    — Cal’s Monthly Books directory: bramses.notion.site/059db2641def4a88988b4d2cee4657ba?v=448bf8afad0740d18f6b109b4bd40d51


    Thanks to our Sponsors:

    blinkist.com/deep
    drinklmnt.com/deep
    expressvpn.com/deep
    cozyearth.com  (Use promo code “Cal”)


    Thanks to Jesse Miller for production, Jay Kerstens for the intro music, Kieron Rees for slow productivity music, and Mark Miles for mastering.

    Ep. 295: Artists Revolt Against Social Media

    Ep. 295: Artists Revolt Against Social Media

    In this episode Cal takes a closer look at a growing trend of artists quitting social media and instead reverting to old-fashioned websites. Are these acts of principled sacrifice or a sustainable way to be creative online? Cal argues for the latter, showing how the internet without social media curation algorithms can be a place of rich discovery and audience building. He then takes questions on similar topics and ends by playing a few rounds of “deep or crazy” during the final segment.

    Below are the questions covered in today's episode (with their timestamps). Get your questions answered by Cal! Here’s the link: bit.ly/3U3sTvo

    Video from today’s episode:  youtube.com/calnewportmedia

    Deep Dive: A Quiet Revolt Against Social Media [7:37]

    - Is my deep living too extreme? [45:06]
    - LinkedIn is getting toxic. Should I quit that too? [47:39]
    - Where do online articles fit into the life of a digital minimalist? [51:09]
    - Did Cal design the specifications for the hardcover copy of “Slow Productivity”? [54:04]
    - How do I not feel overwhelmed by online content after a Digital Declutter? [58:07]
    - CALL: Obsessing over quality [1:01:08]

    CASE STUDY: Applying lessons from “Digital Minimalism” [1:06:37]

    CAL REACTS: Deep or Crazy? [1:13:54]

    Links:


    Thanks to our Sponsors: 


    Thanks to Jesse Miller for production, Jay Kerstens for the intro music, Kieron Rees for slow productivity music, and Mark Miles for mastering.

    Ep. 294: A Tactical Assault on Busyness

    Ep. 294: A Tactical Assault on Busyness

    One of the biggest problems afflicting knowledge workers in the digital age is frantic busyness; days filled with emails, chats, and meetings, without much to show for all the effort. In today’s episode, Cal dives into one of the most-discussed ideas from his new book, Slow Productivity, which offers a simple, tactical assault on this state of persistent busyness. He then answers listener questions about similar issues and lists the book he read in March.

    Below are the questions covered in today's episode (with their timestamps). Get your questions answered by Cal! Here’s the link: bit.ly/3U3sTvo

    Video from today’s episode:  hyoutube.com/calnewportmedia

    Deep Dive: A Tactical Assault on Busyness [3:47]

    - How can I stop chasing the “perfect” productivity system? [34:51]
    - How do I avoid losing my day to distraction? [39:08] 
    - How do I help my partner escape meeting quickstand? [42:31]
    - How do we design the perfect client/task/scheduling system? [48:59]
    - Can Apple Vision Pro help deep work? [54:46]

    The 5 Books Cal Read in March 2024 [1:06:43]

    A Short History of England (Simon Jenkins)
    Into the Impossible (Brian Keating)
    The Amen Effect (Sharon Brous)
    Sink the Bismark! (CS Forester)
    Hidden Potential (Adam Grant)

    Links:
    Buy Cal’s latest book, “Slow Productivity” at calnewport.com/slow
    newyorker.com/science/annals-of-artificial-intelligence/can-an-ai-make-plans
    Thanks to our Sponsors:

    This episode is sponsored by BetterHelp. Give online therapy a try at betterhelp.com/deepquestions
    expressvpn.com/deep
    zocdoc.com/deep
    notion.com/cal

    Thanks to Jesse Miller for production, Jay Kerstens for the intro music, Kieron Rees for slow productivity music, and Mark Miles for mastering.

    Ep. 293: Can A.I. Empty My Inbox?

    Ep. 293: Can A.I. Empty My Inbox?

    Imagine a world in which AI could handle your email inbox on your behalf. No more checking for new messages every five minutes. No more worries that people need you. No more exhausting cognitive context shifts. In this episode, Cal explores how close cutting-edge AI models are to achieving this goal, including using ChatGPT to help him answer some real email. He then dives into his latest article for The New Yorker, which explains the key technical obstacle to fully automated email and how it might be solved. This is followed by reader questions and a look at something interesting.

    Below are the questions covered in today's episode (with their timestamps). Get your questions answered by Cal! Here’s the link:
    bit.ly/3U3sTvo

    Video from today’s episode:  youtube.com/calnewportmedia

    Deep Dive: Can A.I. Empty My Inbox? [4:33]
    - Should I continue to study programming if AI will eventually replace software jobs? [44:40]
    - Is it bad to use ChatGPT to assist with your writing? [49:22]
    - How do I reclaim my workspace for Deep Work? [55:24]
    - How do I decide what to do on my scheduled mini-breaks at work? [1:00:11]
    - CALL: Heidegger’s view on technology [1:02:48]
    - CALL: Seasonality with a partner and kids [1:09:11]

    CASE STUDY: A Silicon Valley Chief of Staff balancing work and ego [1:20:07]

    Something Interesting: General Grant’s Slow Productivity [1:30:08]

    Links:
    Buy Cal’s latest book, “Slow Productivity”at calnewport.com/slow

    newyorker.com/science/annals-of-artificial-intelligence/can-an-ai-make-plans


    Thanks to our Sponsors: 


    Thanks to Jesse Miller for production, Jay Kerstens for the intro music, Kieron Rees for slow productivity music, and Mark Miles for mastering.

    Related Episodes

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    In this episode of Deep Questions I answer reader questions about my daily routine, restarting a deep work practice, and embracing digital minimalism during a pandemic, among other topics.

    To submit your own questions, sign up for my mailing list at calnewport.com. You can submit audio questions at https://www.speakpipe.com/CalNewport

    Please consider subscribing (which helps iTunes rankings) and leaving a review or rating (which helps new listeners decide to try the show).

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    Here’s the full list of topics tackled in today’s episode along with the timestamps:

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    * My daily routine. [3:56]
    * Ensuring employees are working deeply at home [9:09]
    * Keeping a to-do list constantly open. [12:18]
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    * Strategies for transitioning to a deep life. [1:12:48]

    Thanks to listener Jay Kerstens for the intro music.

    86. Choose your weapon to boost creative output

    86. Choose your weapon to boost creative output

    It's easier than ever for creators to get their work noticed. But, it's harder than ever to actually get that work done.

    Think about it this way: You're writing a novel. You use Twitter and Facebook and write on your blog, and your work gets noticed. But, you have to put all of those distractions aside, and get to writing. If you don't, your novel will never become real.

    In this week's episode, I'll show you how to pick the right creative tool for the right creative thinking. Do your best work, without letting distractions knock you off-track.

    This article originally appeared on Medium

    Join Love Your Work Elite

    Some levels of Love Your Work Elite now include a Masterclass video recording with Noah Kagan. I interview Noah about the formula he used to add tens of thousands of leads to his email list. Sign up at lywelite.com.

     

     

    Sponsors
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    Show Notes: http://kadavy.net/blog/posts/choose-your-weapon-podcast/

     

    How to Use Music to Increase Your Productivity

    How to Use Music to Increase Your Productivity

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