Logo
    Search

    Podcast Summary

    • Trademark Dispute between Fabiola Penaque and Coca-ColaAn indigenous woman fought back against Coca-Cola's attempt to enforce their trademark over the word 'coca', highlighting the complexities of intellectual property rights and the potential impact on cultural traditions and small businesses.

      Even the biggest corporations can face challenges from small businesses and individuals when it comes to trademark disputes. In this story, an indigenous woman in Colombia named Fabiola Penaque found herself in a dispute with none other than Coca-Cola over the use of the word "coca" in her beer product. For Fabiola, who is a descendant of a 1000-year-old tradition of using the coca leaf, the cease and desist letter from Coca-Cola was infuriating. But instead of giving in, Fabiola chose to fight back. This is a common story where corporations, especially those with significant market power, try to enforce their trademarks against smaller entities or even appropriate names that have cultural significance. What makes this story fascinating is how Fabiola navigated the situation, standing up against a corporate giant like Coca-Cola, which is synonymous with transnational capitalism. This incident highlights the complexities of intellectual property rights and the potential impact on cultural traditions and small businesses. It also underscores the importance of advocacy and standing up for what one believes in, even when facing a formidable opponent.

    • The Coca Leaf: A Cultural Significance and Controversial StimulantDespite its cultural significance and natural benefits, the coca leaf faces challenges due to its association with cocaine. Fabiola Pinaque, a NASA member, started a business to preserve its traditional use, growing it to about 20 employees.

      The coca leaf, a significant element of the NASA people's culture in Colombia, has an ambiguous status due to its association with cocaine production. For thousands of years, the raw coca leaf has helped Andean people with altitude sickness, suppressed hunger, provided calcium, and given moderate energy boosts. However, global efforts to eradicate cocaine have brought stigma to the coca leaf, leading many to abandon its traditional use. Fabiola Pinaque, a NASA member, saw this as a threat to her culture and started a business, Coca NASA, to sell coca products like tea. Despite legal challenges, she grew the company to about 20 employees and made it well-known in Colombia. It's important to note that the raw coca leaf is mild and not psychoactive like cocaine, making it a relatively safe and natural stimulant. However, its association with illicit drugs continues to pose challenges for those who wish to promote and preserve its traditional use.

    • Trademark dispute between Fabiola and Coca ColaTrademarks can limit use of culturally significant words, leading to conflicts between companies and communities. Understanding cultural significance is crucial.

      Trademark disputes can lead to complex cultural clashes, as seen in the case between Fabiola and Coca Cola. Trademarks help ensure consumer clarity by granting exclusive rights to brands, but they can also limit the use of words and symbols with deep cultural significance. In this instance, the term "coca" holds different meanings for Coca Cola and indigenous communities in Colombia, where the coca leaf is sacred. The Colombian Supreme Court ruled in 2012 that "coca" is a generic term and can be used by anyone in the market. However, Fabiola could potentially use other arguments in her defense, such as Colombia's constitution granting indigenous territories the right to make their own laws and the requirement for new trademarks from indigenous cultures to have their communities' permission. This case highlights the importance of understanding the cultural significance of trademarks and the potential for conflicts between companies and communities.

    • Coconasa vs Coca Cola: PR BattleWhen engaging in legal disputes, consider the potential impact on public perception as negative PR could outweigh any potential legal victory.

      Even when faced with a legal challenge from a multinational corporation like Coca Cola, a smaller business like Coconasa was able to use the power of public relations to their advantage. When Coca Cola issued a cease and desist letter over the use of the word "Coca" in Coconasa's name, Fabiola and her team responded with a letter of their own, threatening to ban Coca Cola from indigenous territories if they persisted. Although Coca Cola did not respond, the media coverage of the situation portrayed Coca Cola as attacking the indigenous population in Colombia, resulting in negative publicity for the corporation. This incident highlights the importance of considering the potential impact on public perception when engaging in legal disputes, as the negative PR could outweigh any potential legal victory. Fabiola remains defiant and determined to continue operating her business, despite the ongoing stalemate.

    • Collaboration and Effective Communication in Podcast ProductionA successful podcast requires a team effort with clear communication and defined roles, resulting in high-quality content and effective sponsor messages.

      Effective communication and collaboration are essential for producing high-quality content. In this episode, a team of individuals with different roles and responsibilities came together to create an engaging podcast. Britney Cronin produced the episode, Melia Agudelo translated the content, Sierra Juarez fact-checked, and Kate Concannon served as the editor. Their collective efforts resulted in a polished final product. Additionally, the episode featured sponsor messages from Mint Mobile and Capital One. Mint Mobile offered a deal for unlimited wireless plans for $15 a month, while Capital One promoted its customized financial services for businesses. The episode was made possible by the team's collaboration and the support of these sponsors. It serves as a reminder that effective communication and partnerships are crucial for achieving success in any endeavor. Furthermore, Capital One emphasized its ability to provide tailored financial solutions for businesses, while Mint Mobile offered an affordable wireless plan for consumers. Both messages were integrated seamlessly into the episode, demonstrating the importance of sponsor messages that resonate with the audience. In conclusion, this episode highlights the power of collaboration and effective communication in producing high-quality content, as well as the importance of sponsor messages that add value for the audience.

    Recent Episodes from The Indicator from Planet Money

    How much do presidents ACTUALLY influence the economy?

    How much do presidents ACTUALLY influence the economy?
    Voters have a bleak outlook on the economy right now, and many are pointing the finger at President Biden. At the same time, many voters have a rosy view of the economy when Donald Trump was president. But how much credit or blame should a president get for the economy? And how do partisan politics play into our perception of the economy's performance?

    Related episodes:
    Common economic myths, debunked (Apple / Spotify)
    Not too hot, not too cold: A 'Goldilocks' jobs report (Apple / Spotify)

    For sponsor-free episodes of The Indicator from Planet Money, subscribe to Planet Money+ via Apple Podcasts or at plus.npr.org.

    Music by
    Drop Electric. Find us: TikTok, Instagram, Facebook, Newsletter.

    Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoices

    NPR Privacy Policy

    What military brats tell us about social mobility

    What military brats tell us about social mobility
    Children of U.S. military families, a.k.a. brats, are known for their adaptability when relocating to new neighborhoods and schools every few years. This migratory population became the basis for brand new research on how the neighborhood you grew up in affects your economic success later in life. Today on the show, how a place influences your financial destiny.

    Related episodes:
    Chasing the American Dream at Outback Steakhouse (Apple / Spotify)
    The secret to upward mobility: Friends

    For sponsor-free episodes of The Indicator from Planet Money, subscribe to Planet Money+ via Apple Podcasts or at plus.npr.org.

    Music by
    Drop Electric. Find us: TikTok, Instagram, Facebook, Newsletter.


    Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoices

    NPR Privacy Policy


    The young trolls of Wall Street are growing up

    The young trolls of Wall Street are growing up
    Back in 2021, the meme stock frenzy was at its peak: Roaring Kitty AKA Keith Gill, and young day traders gleefully upended financial markets. Roaring Kitty disappeared for a bit before returning just a couple months ago.

    His disciples that followed him into the markets, however, never left. That's according to Nathaniel Popper in his new book, The Trolls of Wall Street: How the Outcasts and Insurgents are Hacking the Markets.

    Today on the show, why Nathaniel believes these day traders are here to stay and where they're putting their money now.

    Related Episodes:
    GameStop and the Short Squeeze
    The tower of Nvidia

    For sponsor-free episodes of The Indicator from Planet Money, subscribe to Planet Money+ via Apple Podcasts or at plus.npr.org.

    Music by
    Drop Electric. Find us: TikTok, Instagram, Facebook, Newsletter.

    Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoices

    NPR Privacy Policy

    One of the hottest jobs in AI right now: 'types-question guy'

    One of the hottest jobs in AI right now: 'types-question guy'
    U.S. job growth cooled this month. But one job is hot to the touch: AI prompt engineer. The role can command a six figure salary, but ... what is it? Today, we speak to an AI prompt engineer to figure out what they actually do and how long the job could remain hot.

    Related:
    AI creates, transforms and destroys ... jobs (Apple / Spotify)
    If AI is so good, why are there still so many jobs for translators?
    Applying for a job? Make sure your resume is AI-Friendly (Apple / Spotify)

    For sponsor-free episodes of The Indicator from Planet Money, subscribe to Planet Money+ via Apple Podcasts or at plus.npr.org.

    Music by
    Drop Electric. Find us: TikTok, Instagram, Facebook, Newsletter.

    Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoices

    NPR Privacy Policy

    The game theory that led to nuclear standoffs

    The game theory that led to nuclear standoffs
    Last week, Vladimir Putin vowed to make new nuclear weapons and consider placing them close to NATO countries. Meanwhile, here in the US, the government boosted its nuclear weapon spending by 18% between 2022 and 2023.

    The world is closer to nuclear war than it's been in at least forty years.

    Today on the show: The game theory of nuclear war. When can mathematical models help us, and when can they lead us astray ... even to the brink of destruction?

    Guest Kelly Clancy's book is Playing With Reality: How Games Have Shaped Our World.

    Related Episodes:
    How to get Russia to pay Ukraine
    Congressional game theory

    For sponsor-free episodes of The Indicator from Planet Money, subscribe to Planet Money+ via Apple Podcasts or at plus.npr.org.

    Music by
    Drop Electric. Find us: TikTok, Instagram, Facebook, Newsletter.

    Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoices

    NPR Privacy Policy

    The economic implications of Europe's jolt right

    The economic implications of Europe's jolt right
    Europe is expecting a wave of victories from far-right candidates in upcoming national elections. Voters are showing they're worried about income inequality, immigration and the effects of participating in a global economy. Today, we take a look at what the swing to the right means for Europe's economy and the European stance on globalization.

    Related Episodes:
    Can Europe fund its defense ambitions (Apple / Spotify)
    Why the EU is investigating China's wind turbines (Apple / Spotify)
    How vikings launched globalization 1.0

    For sponsor-free episodes of The Indicator from Planet Money, subscribe to Planet Money+ via Apple Podcasts or at plus.npr.org.

    Music by Drop Electric. Find us: TikTok, Instagram, Facebook, Newsletter.


    Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoices

    NPR Privacy Policy

    How the end of Roe is reshaping the medical workforce

    How the end of Roe is reshaping the medical workforce
    It's been two years since the U.S. Supreme Court overturned the right to an abortion, triggering a parade of restrictions and bans in conservative-led states. Today on the show, how the medical labor force is changing post-Roe and why graduating medical students, from OB-GYNs to pediatricians, are avoiding training in states with abortion bans.

    Related listening:
    What's the cure for America's doctor shortage?
    KFF: Medical Residents Are Increasingly Avoiding Abortion Ban States


    For sponsor-free episodes of The Indicator from Planet Money, subscribe to Planet Money+ via Apple Podcasts or at plus.npr.org.

    Music by
    Drop Electric. Find us: TikTok, Instagram, Facebook, Newsletter.

    Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoices

    NPR Privacy Policy

    Indicators of the Week: Debate Edition

    Indicators of the Week: Debate Edition
    Indicators of the Week is BACK! This week we're doing something just a little bit different. You see, it's the same 'ol Indicators of the Week you're used to, but as a nod to last night's presidential debate, this time, it's debate style.

    On today's episode, your candidates argue over who has the best Indicator of the Week: the links discovered between health care prices and layoffs, stress-tested banks, and ... cow burps?

    Related Episodes:
    Time to make banks more stressed?
    The Cows Are Taking All The Land

    For sponsor-free episodes of The Indicator from Planet Money, subscribe to Planet Money+ via Apple Podcasts or at plus.npr.org.

    Music by
    Drop Electric. Find us: TikTok, Instagram, Facebook, Newsletter.

    Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoices

    NPR Privacy Policy

    Do polluters pay, or do they get paid?

    Do polluters pay, or do they get paid?
    For years, rich nations have sent money to lower-income countries to help deal with the impacts of climate change. But it turns out, these wealthy nations are finding creative ways to funnel some of that financing back into their own economies. Today, we look at how the climate crisis is reviving a debate over how money should flow from rich to less-rich nations.

    Related episodes:
    A countdown to climate action (Apple / Spotify)
    Gambling, literally, on climate change (Apple / Spotify)
    Blue bonds: A market solution to the climate crisis? (Apple / Spotify)
    Why a debt tsunami is coming for the global economy (Apple / Spotify)

    For sponsor-free episodes of The Indicator from Planet Money, subscribe to Planet Money+ via Apple Podcasts or at plus.npr.org.

    Music by Drop Electric. Find us: TikTok, Instagram, Facebook, Newsletter.



    Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoices

    NPR Privacy Policy

    What's going to happen to the Trump tax cuts?

    What's going to happen to the Trump tax cuts?
    The last major overhaul of the tax code was in 2017, when Republicans passed the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act. Much of that is set to expire next year, and that means a big debate over tax policy is looming.

    Voters this fall won't just be voting for a president—they'll essentially decide who pays for the government and how much for years to come.

    Today on the show, we explain the battle lines forming in this tax code throwdown.

    Related Episodes:
    The Good, The Bad and The Tax Cuts
    Happy Birthday, Tax Cuts!

    For sponsor-free episodes of The Indicator from Planet Money, subscribe to Planet Money+ via Apple Podcasts or at plus.npr.org. Music by Drop Electric. Find us: TikTok, Instagram, Facebook, Newsletter.

    Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoices

    NPR Privacy Policy

    Related Episodes

    87. Do I Need a Patent, Trademark, or Copyright?—Devin Miller, Founder/CEO, Miller IP Law

    87. Do I Need a Patent, Trademark, or Copyright?—Devin Miller, Founder/CEO, Miller IP Law

    How do you know if your business needs a patent, a trademark, or a copyright? Or maybe you’ve just wondered what the differences between patents, trademarks, and copyrights happen to be and why they are important. If you have found yourself asking these questions before then this episode is for you. 

    ABOUT OUR GUEST:

    Our guest today, is Devin Miller. He is the Founder, Managing Partner, and CEO of Miller IP Law, a business that helps start-ups and small businesses with their patents and trademarks. Devin's previous clients include Amazon, Intel, Redhat, and Ford and he has previously been featured on other podcasts including Bigger Pockets Podcast and Wealth Junkies. 

    **Subscribe to our NEWEST Podcast called: Franchise Your Business. CLICK HERE.

    LINKS FROM THE EPISODE:


    ABOUT BIG SKY FRANCHISE TEAM:
    This episode is powered by Big Sky Franchise Team. If you are ready to talk about franchising your business you can schedule your free, no-obligation, franchise consultation online at: https://bigskyfranchiseteam.com/ or by calling Big Sky Franchise Team at: 855-824-4759. 


    The Busy Creator 36, Intellectual Property & Legal Issues for Creative Pros with Attorney & Educator Kelley Keller

    The Busy Creator 36, Intellectual Property & Legal Issues for Creative Pros with Attorney & Educator Kelley Keller

    The Busy Creator 36 w/guest Kelley Keller

     

    Kelley Keller (@KelleyKeller) is an Intellectual Property Attorney & Education, and founder of The Keller Law Firm. She’s also the creator of Innovation to Profits, an online educational resource for anyone with creative, valuable ideas.

    This legal-focused conversation discusses the types of IP, how portfolios must be handled, competition in the age of the Internet, Fair Use, and other legal matters important for creative pros in business.

     

    Show Notes & Links

    Tools

    Techniques

    • Be proactive with new contracts and agreements; get an attorney to review 
    • Set up Google Alerts for brands/trademarks
    • Hire a junior staffer to search for your brand online

    Get The Episode

    Subscribe in iTunes

    Subscribe to The Busy Creator Podcast on iTunes