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    Antiracism Center Under Fire & Immigrant Population | 9.23.23

    enSeptember 23, 2023

    Podcast Summary

    • Boston University's Antiracist Center Under Investigation for Mismanagement and Staff ExploitationBoston University's Center for Antiracist Research, led by Ibram X. Kendi, is under investigation for financial mismanagement and staff layoffs. Meanwhile, Chicago's mayor is tackling food equity issues by opening city-run grocery stores in crime-prone areas.

      Boston University's Center for Antiracist Research, led by author and activist Ibram X. Kendi, is under investigation for financial mismanagement and staff exploitation. The center was established in 2020 specifically to recruit Kendi, who gained prominence after George Floyd's death and is known for his work on critical race theory. Half of the center's staff has been laid off, and the university is conducting an inquiry into the matter. Meanwhile, Chicago's mayor is addressing food equity issues in crime-ridden areas by opening city-run grocery stores after private chains left. The immigrant population in the US continues to grow, with the largest increases seen in certain groups. This news comes as Ibram X. Kendi's center faces allegations of mismanagement and exploitation, casting a shadow over the academic pursuit of antiracist research.

    • Boston University's Center for Antiracist Research Faces CriticismThe Boston University Center for Antiracist Research, led by Ibram X. Kendi, has faced criticism for lack of original research output, mismanagement of funds, and alleged employment violence and trauma. External critics also question Kendi's focus on personal projects during his tenure.

      The Boston University (BU) Center for Antiracist Research, launched with much fanfare and led by Ibram X. Kendi, has faced heavy criticism for its lack of original research output and mismanagement of substantial donations from major companies and grant makers. Former faculty members have openly criticized the center, with some alleging employment violence and trauma. External critics also point to Kendi's focus on personal projects, like a graphic novel, podcast, and TV series, during his tenure at the center. Despite these concerns, Kendi has responded by acknowledging missteps but also emphasizing the challenges faced by leaders of color and women leaders, who are often held to different standards and have their authority questioned or undermined. The university has yet to provide an accounting for the center's funds.

    • Investigations into mismanagement at Boston University Center for Antiracist ResearchOngoing probes into alleged mismanagement at BU's Center for Antiracist Research, with mayor Brandon Johnson advocating for a city-owned grocery store to promote food equity and address food insecurity in Chicago.

      There are ongoing investigations into allegations of mismanagement at the Boston University Center for Antiracist Research, with the university welcoming the inquiry while expressing support for the center and its director, Ibram X. Kendi. Kendi himself has acknowledged the challenges faced by nonprofits in response to tightening grant funds, with several left-wing organizations undergoing layoffs recently. Meanwhile, Chicago's Democratic mayor, Brandon Johnson, is pushing for a city-owned grocery store to promote food equity and address the exit of corporate grocery stores, particularly affecting Black and Latino residents who are disproportionately food insecure. These issues highlight the complexities of addressing systemic issues through government intervention and the potential impact on various communities.

    • Addressing Chicago's Food Deserts: A Complex IssueTo tackle Chicago's food deserts, a comprehensive approach is needed to address both poverty and crime, as well as the financial viability of grocery stores in underserved areas.

      The issue of food deserts in Chicago, where residents lack access to healthy food options due to distance or poverty, is complex and multifaceted. While advocates argue for government intervention, corporate grocery stores like Walmart and Whole Foods are leaving the city due to financial losses and crime. The cost of funding new grocery stores would be significant, and the city is already struggling financially. Despite this, the mayor's chief of policy claims the project won't use taxpayer dollars, and funding may be available at the national and state levels. However, the issue of crime and profitability remains a major challenge. The closure of four Walmart stores in Chicago's south and west side neighborhoods, which have lost tens of millions of dollars over the past 17 years, underscores the urgency of finding a solution. Ultimately, addressing food deserts in Chicago will require a comprehensive approach that tackles both the systemic issues of poverty and crime, as well as the financial viability of grocery stores in these areas.

    • City's plan for publicly-funded grocery store in food desert sparks controversyOpponents argue against gov't funded grocery store due to concerns over efficiency, transparency, impact on private enterprise, and city's history of corruption and large deficit. US immigrant population reached a new record high of 46 million, or 14%, driven by legal immigration and refugee programs.

      The city's plan to establish a publicly-funded grocery store in a food desert area is not without controversy. While the mayor's office claims the store will be funded by state and national taxpayer money, opponents argue it's akin to Soviet-style central planning and question the government's ability to efficiently manage tax dollars given the city's history of corruption and large deficit. They also raise concerns about the potential impact on private enterprise and the lack of transparency regarding pricing and efficiency. Meanwhile, the US immigrant population reached a new record high last year, with over 46 million immigrants, or 14% of the total population, according to new census estimates. This increase was driven by a resurgence of legal immigration and refugee programs after pandemic-related pauses.

    • 2 million illegal migrants entered US since BidenSince Biden's presidency, over 2 million illegal immigrants have entered the US, with significant increases in immigrants from countries like Venezuela, Brazil, Colombia, Honduras, Africa, Asia, and Afghanistan. Florida saw the largest increase last year, with 200,000 settling there, leading to demographic shifts in various states and cities.

      Since Biden took office, over 2,000,000 illegal migrants have entered the US interior. Historically, Mexico has been the largest source of immigrants, but there's been a shift with more people coming from Venezuela, Brazil, Colombia, Honduras, Africa, Asia, and even Afghanistan. Florida saw the biggest increase in new immigrants last year, with 200,000 settling there. Other states and cities, like Georgia, Maryland, New Jersey, Iowa, New York City, and Chicago, are also experiencing significant influxes of new immigrants. The immigrant population share in America is growing, leading to a major demographic shift with downstream effects. This trend is particularly noticeable in cities like New York City and Chicago, which are dealing with migrant crises and are considering changes to their shelter laws.

    • Supporting the mission of Morning WireListeners can subscribe, rate highly, and share the podcast to expand reach and amplify the message, bringing more balance to the national discourse

      Morning Wire is dedicated to adding balance to the national conversation. To support this mission and enjoy the show, listeners are encouraged to subscribe, rate us highly, and share the podcast with others. This collective action will help expand our reach and amplify our message. By doing so, we can work together to bring more balance and nuance to the national discourse. So, if you find value in our discussions and appreciate our unique perspective, please consider taking these steps to help spread the word. Together, we can make a difference and bring more balance to the table. That's Morning Wire.

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